Tag Archives: Emerging Artist

SW Regional SPE: Skott Chandler

Sharing photographers that I met at the SW Regional SPE Conference hosted by the Center of Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado….

I think most of us would like to think we lead interesting lives, but Colorado photographer, Skott Chandler provides the evidence that much of what we do is routine or banal. Skott gave a spirited presentation at SPE that spoke to his creative approaches to making images. The photographs featured today from his project, House Watch, are the result of self-created pinhole cameras secured to the ceilings of a whole host of living spaces.  The results reflect how people (and dogs) use space–those who are in focus or semi-focus are more stationary, those who disappear are only moving through the room.

Skott is a  photographic artist in Denver, Colorado where he teaches at the Art Institute of Colorado. He received his degree in Studio Art at Southern Utah University, and during that time he received a UGRASP (Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Program) grant for his surreal Photocubism series.
He then received his MFA from the Savannah College of Art and Design. Skott has exhibited work throughout the United States, as well as internationally in Bordeaux, France, Hong Kong, and Geneva, Switzerland. His work was selected for Klopmpching Gallery’s inaugural FRESH 2011 photography competition and he was recognized by Gallery 263 in Cambridge, MA, as one of the Top 30 Emerging Artist Under 30 for 2011.

 House Watch

Humans have many levels of connection with their personal spaces. Narratives within these domestic spaces differ depending on the inhabitants and their activities that may be mundane, ambiguous, hilarious, absurd, or unsettling. The space within a house affects the inhabitants, and the inhabitants affect the space–an oddly intriguing phenomenon that proves difficult to visualize. 

Creating a photographic representation of such an abstract emotional experience was my motivation. The photographs take the perspective of an omniscient voyeur investigating the dynamics of space within a home. Ceiling mounted pinhole cameras cast an unflinching gaze upon the inhabitants and rooms within the walls; not to judge, but to witness.

Caleb Cole

One of my favorite people and photographers is Caleb Cole.  His work touches on themes of identity, of not fitting in, of the search for self–and much of this exploration is done with humor and an off-filter sensibility. This quote from his bio will give you a idea: “Born in Indianapolis, Caleb is a former altar server, scout, and 4-H Grand Champion in Gift Wrapping. His mother instilled in him a love of garage sales and thrift stores, where he developed a fascination with the junk that people leave behind.”  My kind of guy, indeed.

I am featuring work from two of his new series, Odd One Out and Dolls, recently exhibited at Gallery Kayafas in Boston. Cole is a 2011 St. Botolph Club Foundation Emerging Artist Award winner, 2011 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellowship Finalist, 2011 Somerville Arts Council Fellowship awardee, 2010 Magenta Foundation Flash Forward Winner, 2009 Artadia Award winner, and a 2009 Photolucida Critical Mass finalist. He regularly exhibits nationally and was featured in Boston Magazine (HOME) as an emerging photographer who is “shaking up New England’s visual arts scene.”

The images in Odd One Out began as found photographs, purchased in antique stores and estate sales, of groups of people during special events, reunions, and family gatherings. The photographs are the spoils of a hunt, the proceeds of afternoons spent looking into the eyes of people I do not know and who may no longer be living. I select images of people who, unlike the rest of the smiling faces in the frame, bear looks of loneliness and longing that stop me in my tracks.

Removed from their original context and meanings, I then digitally alter these photographs to segregate the one from the many, isolating the person from their surroundings by a field of white. The shape of the crowd is maintained, hinting at details of the group of which the person is a part, but with which they do not feel at home. The negation of the group serves to emphasize the presence of the one, to make visible the person who feels invisible. In constructing these images, I tell the story of the outsider, the odd one, those who are alone in a crowd.

Dolls
Often thought of as toys for children, dolls are models of not only who those children are expected to become as future parents, but also of where they came from, of who they used to be as infants.  Children’s selection o certain dolls is about personal identification, a blank canvas onto which they can project their desires, and caring for the dolls becomes a process of understanding themselves–how is this doll like me or unlike me?  who am I and who will I become?

This is how I approach the selection and alteration of vintage and antique dolls. Through the use of paint, clay, thread, and hair, I remake the dolls in my image, distilling my likeness down to the secondary sex characteristics of a balding head and sideburns, leaving the bodies of the dolls naked and ambiguously gendered.  The process of transformation is a meditation on my body as it once was and will be, my gender and sexuality, how I relate to myself as I age, gain weight, and how I make sense of my mortality.  The dolls serve as external reference points for my own understanding of how my body fits in, how similar or dissimilar it is to those around me, as well as that which makes me recognizable as myself.

Europe Week: Sofie Knijff

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares a week of European photographers, today with Sofie Knijff. A huge thank you to Jacqueline for her insight and efforts.

Sofie Knijff graduated from the Fotoacademie Amsterdam in 2007 after a career in the world of theatre. She has won numerous awards such as the Netherlands Photo Academy Award, the Harry Penning’s Award and the FOTO 8 “People’s Choice” Award (UK). In 2011, she received a grant from the Sem Presser Fund and in 2012 from the Mondriaan Foundation. Nominated Emerging Artist by the Fotomuseum Winthertur in Switzerland, her work has since been widely exhibited in Europe and in the US.

Her series Translations will be published by Kehrer Verlag.

Sofie comments on the European photography scene:  Photography is recognized and rising as an art form among collectors and galleries. In the Netherlands, we also have Art foundations that support the development of Dutch photography and some internationally known photobook designers (Kummer & Hermann, SYB, Teun van der Heijden, Hans Gremmen).

The work presented is a selection of images from my series “Translations”. Over the past 3 years I have traveled through Mali, India ,South- Africa, Brazil and Greenland. Portraying children and their fantasy world. My aim was to isolate these children from their surroundings, and daily life, and focus their attention in order to reveal their own “dream character”.

 By using the same backdrop, I created a stage on which the dreams could come to life. The challenge was to build a subtle level concentration to capture the moment of transformation. At the same time, I took images of the empty spaces in which these children live; allowing to create a set of portraits where the inside and outside mirror and influence one another.

Jon Horvath, Untitled (from Wide Eyed)

Jon Horvath, Untitled (from Wide Eyed)

Jon Horvath

Untitled (from Wide Eyed),
Winslow, Arizona, 2012
From the Wide Eyed series
Website – JonHorvath.net

Jon Horvath is an artist and educator residing in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2008. His work has been exhibited nationally in galleries including: The Print Center (Philadelphia), Macy Gallery at Columbia University (New York), Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, and The Detroit Center for Contemporary Photography. His work is currently held in the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Haggerty Museum of Art, and is included in the Midwest Photographers Project at The Museum of Contemporary Photography. Horvath was a finalist for the The Greater Milwaukee Foundation's 2009 and 2010 Mary L. Nohl Emerging Artist Fellowship. In 2011, he was named a US Flash Forward winner by The Magenta Foundation. Horvath currently teaches at The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and The Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design.

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin

Displaced 1,
Nova Scotia, Canada, 2007
From the Displaced series
Website – LaurenHenkin.com

Born in Washington, D.C, Lauren Henkin grew up in Maryland and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in architecture from Washington University in St. Louis. She states, “My work focuses on answering the question, What will last? I work from the inside out, using internal narrative as the foundation in which to produce objects that reinterpret space, light and form found in the external.” Henkin is an educator, reviewer, writer, frequent speaker, photolucida advisory board member, author of numerous books, and active member in the photographic community. Her work is widely collected by private collectors as well as institutions such as Southeast Museum of Photography, Yale University and Dartmouth College. Her work has been published in numerous journals on photography and the book arts. She is a Px3 multi-category winner, Oregon Regional Arts & Culture Council grant winner, with other award nominations in both the Brink Emerging Artist and Contemporary Northwest Art Awards."

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin

Displaced 1,
Nova Scotia, Canada, 2007
From the Displaced series
Website – LaurenHenkin.com

Born in Washington, D.C, Lauren Henkin grew up in Maryland and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in architecture from Washington University in St. Louis. She states, “My work focuses on answering the question, What will last? I work from the inside out, using internal narrative as the foundation in which to produce objects that reinterpret space, light and form found in the external.” Henkin is an educator, reviewer, writer, frequent speaker, photolucida advisory board member, author of numerous books, and active member in the photographic community. Her work is widely collected by private collectors as well as institutions such as Southeast Museum of Photography, Yale University and Dartmouth College. Her work has been published in numerous journals on photography and the book arts. She is a Px3 multi-category winner, Oregon Regional Arts & Culture Council grant winner, with other award nominations in both the Brink Emerging Artist and Contemporary Northwest Art Awards."

Keiko Hiromi

I had the pleasure of meeting Keiko Hiromi in Boston at the Flash Forward Festival, and was intrigued by her series of drag queens.  Keiko is from Tokyo, but has called Boston home for a number of years.  She received a B.A. from Suffolk University and graduated from New
England School of Photography in 2005. Much of her work looks at artifice and heightened entertainment, from the dance floor, to the stage, and even to the pulpit.
Her work has been exhibited
nationally and internationally has received recognitions and awards,
including The Griffin Museum Emerging Photographer Award, Project Basho
Emerging Artist Award and “Best in Show” in The Photo Review. Keiko’s photographs are  in numerous private collections and have been favorably
reviewed by Kotaro Iizawa, one of Japan’s most prominent photography
critics. She was a finalist for the Pollux Award 2010, a Julia Margaret
Cameron Award portfolio finalist, and will be exhibiting work at the
2012 Les Rencontres d’Arles in France.  Her work is available through the Panopticon Gallery.

Keiko has been documenting the drag culture in Boston for a number of years.  I am featuring her color work and her series, Jacques Cabaret 2007, Drag Queens 2011 & Jacques in Color.

Jacques Cabaret is one of the oldest drag
queen venues in Boston, MA. I first went to Jacques Cabaret as a
customer with a friend in 2007.  During my first experience at a full
drag show, I recall having to sit uncomfortably with vodka in a plastic
cup at table, surrounded by obnoxious bachelorette parties and really
“tall women”. I felt completely out of place.  As soon as the show
commenced, the performers and their stage presence blew me away. I
became aware of their raw and uncut power.  There was no more
discomfort. Since that time I’ve had to return again and again to
document them.

I worked on Jacques Cabaret 2007 for three months.  During my shooting time, I was often referred to as a Ninja photographer.  I was afforded the opportunity to get to know the queens and people at Jacques Cabaret, not just as subjects but also as individuals. On my first day approaching these entertainers in 2007, I asked them if I could photograph them. Mizery looked me over from the top of my head to my shoes from her dressing room and said “sure, rule with me is no photos while I am changing down there” and winked.

Since then I have garnered that each had a story and history. I feel grateful to have shared in the intimate details of their lives, through photography and intrapersonal relationships.

Jojo, the cross dressing waiter was getting married to a long term girlfriend: Destiny, one of the drag performers, always took very little to get ready for the show, compared to others due to having had sex change operation.  Miss. Kris worked as a large size man’s cloth store as a day job.  When meeting Dahlia Black’s ex girl friend (remain her best friend after coming out), she smiled and said, “ if I was a straight boy, we would probably have been married with a couple kids by now.”

I returned to photograph “Drag Queen 2011” at Jacques Cabaret last March right after the disaster in Japan. I changed my stance as a photographer. Rather than seek to minimalize my own presence as in the past (like a “fly on the wall”), I consciously acknowledged it this time. In 2006 I was afraid of everything. I feared that by being there it would have change the group dynamics of the environment and I would have ruined my “documentary photographs”. I realize now that “I” have to be there to make a picture.  My involvement with these individuals allows an entirely new perspective. I look for color, contrast, shapes, and enjoy putting my Jacques’s experiences into photographs.

Photo News: Diemar/Noble Photography and Rhubarb-Rhubarb host The Gathering event tonight in London with a photo tombola

The Gathering, an event jointly organised by Diemar/Noble Photography and Rhubarb-Rhubarb, takes place tonight from 6-9pm at Diemar/Noble.

For one night only, images donated by participating photographers including Brian Griffin, Martin Parr, Emily-Jane Major, Michael Donald, Laura Pannack and Zed Nelson will be on show at the Diemar/Noble gallery space. Prints have been donated by image makers from the UK, USA, Spain, Italy, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Australia and Bangladesh.

Participants pick a numbered ticket from a tombola and receive the corresponding numbered print as well as a copy of the event catalogue. “This gives you the opportunity to own a print by a world famous or an emerging artist for an investment of just £50″. The event is a fundraiser not a private view.

Money raised from the event is to support the work of Rhubarb-Rhubarb as “it moves into a digital future”. Not exactly sure what this means, in terms of what the money raised is for, specifically – money to make a transition and get things online?

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Filed under: Photographers, Photography Auction Tagged: contemporary photography, Diemar/Noble Photography, london, photo auction, Rhubarb-Rhubarb, The Gathering