Tag Archives: Email

Displaced History and the Art of Collective Memory

Somewhere in Switzerland there’s a municipal archive, the collective memory of a town, with negatives and newspapers and postcards and photographs that tell the story of the area from 1880–1940. It’s the collective paper memory of the place, including a picture of four children who might not have grown into respected elders, a picture of a priest who may have performed important rituals in the town, a picture of a young woman whose face you might recognize—if the town’s memories are your own.

On the other hand, for photographer Nicolas Dhervillers, who spent only six months residing in Sion, the people in those images were more like characters in a play he would write. Acting the parts to which the photographer assigned them, they appear throughout a series called My Sentimental Archives which will be exhibited at Galérie Bacqueville in Lille, France through Nov. 20. In a meditation on appropriation, each photograph is a two-in-one. Dhervillers’ landscape photography from the area was subjected to a digital process adapted from the cinematic “day for night” technique, lending an eerie look to pictures taken in broad daylight; the archival figures are placed within those landscapes and washed with the unnatural digital light.

“It was very important to find a technique that gives an impression of being ‘outside time,’” Dhervillers told TIME in an email. “Thus, it’s not about a simple photograph but rather a photograph that mixes different mediums that I particularly like: theater for the positions and attitudes of the characters, movies for the light, photography for the idea of controlling the framework, painting for the final rendering.”

Each figure from the archives—small, dusty, black and white people—has been carefully restored by Dhervillers. And, in the process of restoration, the photographer says he felt that the images raised a spiritual question: can we create a present, a now, out of the scraps of the past? “The appropriation of the collective memory, of photographic memory, overlaps with the desire to question a picture in a larger sense,” he said. “This series takes us into a fictional space outside of time, through the photographic processing.”

Dhervillers has worked with appropriated figures before; his series Tourists uses images taken from the internet. But in this case, in the end, his questions about photographic appropriation took on another dimension: the archives from which Dhervillers took the figures did, in a way, become “his.” Even if he didn’t share the town’s history, he felt he knew its inhabitants well. “I spent a lot of time with these little characters,” he said. “I raised them, I colorized them, I gave them life.”

This interview has been translated from French.


Nicolas Dhervillers is a Paris-based photographer represented by School Gallery/Olivier Castaing in Paris.

Flash Forward Festival Boston 2012 Livestream

Flash Forward Festival Boston 2012 Livestream

Flash Forward Festival 2012

A collaboration with The Magenta Foundation

Hi All,

Touching base with a short dispatch from Flak Photo HQ…

Like a lot of you, I'm watching more photography-related videos online. (If you're interested, you can check out some of my recent favorites here on Vimeo.) I've also benefited from those forward-thinking organizations that have invested the time and resources to share their programs with the world using streaming video technology.

Photo education plays a key role in many of my projects so I was excited when The Magenta Foundation founder Maryann Camilleri asked me to join this year's Flash Forward Festival Programming Committee. That group is a passionate one and it was lots of fun working with them to bring this festival to life. We knew from the beginning that we wanted to broadcast this year's program online and now it's time — the festivities kick off Thursday, June 7 at 10 A.M. EDT.

Watch Flash Foward Festival Boston 2012 on the Flak Photo Stream »

I'm looking forward to sharing these programs with the online community and hope to produce more educational projects like this. If you are a photo/arts event coordinator interested in sharing your organization's video programming with a wider audience I'd love to here from you. Please feel free to contact me by email or Facebook at any time. Thank you!

Best,

Andy Adams
Editor • Producer • Publisher
FlakPhoto.com

Under Exposed: the Roaming Eye gives photography and multimedia work by Nikki Luna and Emil Kozak cyber time and space

© Nikki Luna, Leaf Cuttings

© Nikki Luna, Leaf Cuttings, the mother of one of the missing women opens a drawer

© Nikki Luna, Leaf Cuttings

 

Emil Kozak, Little White Plastic Bird

Emil Kozak, Big Black Nothing (2010-ongoing)

The Roaming Eye (tRE) comes across work in both physical and virtual spaces and will be presenting some of it under the heading Under Exposed. The aim is to support the less well-known, the small, and those who reach out to connect and share. There are many ways for photographers and visual artists to promote work; some have agents or galleries to do it for them, some have universities to push the work (and its reputation), some are brilliant DIY self-promoters. But then there are many, many others.

Those who are quieter; those who are still there – reading, looking and listening – who may push out occasionally, sometimes apologetically, often tentatively. Under Exposed is a space for these kind of photographers and visual artists – the ones who don’t overuse, or abuse, the social-media promotion machine, yet still feel that they have created something they want to share and to communicate. What have you got to lose? Certainly, you won’t lose face as cyberspace is the place to take risks.

So, Bring It On.

Get in Touch: If this sounds like you, or someone you know and want to support, then take a chance on the Roaming Eye and get in touch via email or the blog. Simply email some examples of work and/or a link. All work will be looked at and considered for inclusion. But remember, this is a curated blog so there is a filter system, but tRE likes to think its approach is open-minded and open-hearted. If you don’t agree, then why not comment. Web 2.0 was designed with dialogue in mind.

NIKKI LUNA
To kick off, tRE presents some images from Nikki Luna (whose website is, temporarily, in the process of being updated). Luna writes: “For the show, Shade my eyes and I can’t see you, (the title is from the lyrics of the Pink Floyd song Green is the Colour) my focus was to share the story of some women, who apart from being human-rights defenders, also chose to live and work with the poor, rural communities, teaching reading and writing. They were taken by military forces and were never seen again. Three of these women were killed by state security forces. The other two are still missing.

“These women are, first and foremost mothers, daughters, wives and sisters, and women to the people they have left behind. Not everyone may know, or understand, human-rights defenders, but we all know and have some close relationships with a woman in our lives. It’s sad that these women, all in their 20s, lost their lives and may be soon forgotten. The struggle to search and find them, the constant pushing for the truth, and the fact of injustice still goes on.”

For those who want to know more about the context, there’s an Amnesty International video documenting the story of the two women who are still missing. Note that the video The Escape of Raymond Manalo has subtitles and shows scenes of a graphic and disturbing nature.

“University of Philippines students Karen Empeno and Sherlyn Cadapan were among those who disappeared. Raymond Manalo, who was kidnapped by the Philippino army under the ex-General Jovito Palparan, was tortured but escaped and lived to tell the tale of his plight and of the other people he met in the camps. Among them were Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeno. He reports that he saw them naked and hanging upside down, while they had water poured on them, were hit and sexually violated”, writes Luna.

Luna will be showing work in a group show at the Equator Arts Project gallery at the Gillman Barracks in Singapore, as well as in two solo shows – firstly, at the Pablo Art Gallery in the Philippines from May 26 – June 23 where she has a video/photo projection and a soil/land installation and later in the year at the Manila Contemporary art gallery in September, date (tbc), where she will be creating a multimedia installation that includes stoneware.

EMIL KOZAK
On a different note, Emil Kozak who is from Denmark but lives in Spain, has two bodies of work Big Black Nothing (2010-ongoing) for which he walks until he “gets scared or can’t go any further, then takes a photo, and goes back” and Little White Plastic Bird – a project based on a true story.

Filed under: Photographers, Video Art, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Big Black Nothing, Denmark, Emil Kozak, Equator Arts Project, General Jovito Palparan, human rights, Karen Empeno, Leaf Cuttings, Little White Plastic Bird, Manila Contemporary, Nikki Luna, Philippines, Raymond Manalo, Sherlyn Cadapan, the Roaming Eye

One World Portfolio Review

If you live in the San Francisco area, or want to plan a trip there in March, the Photo Alliance are offering a Portfolio Review.

2012 OUR WORLD PORTFOLIO REVIEW

Featuring:
Our World Portfolio Review
A fantastic opportunity to show your photographs to
professionals who publish, exhibit, write and teach.
Get new ideas, make connections, and find opportunities to distribute, publish and exhibit your work.

FINAL SUBMISSIONS DUE DATE: Friday FEBRUARY 10th, 2012.
Must be RECEIVED by 5pm.

Please do send us an email letting us know you are applying however, so we can anticipate receiving your application. [email protected]

Our Mailing address:

PhotoAlliance
PO Box 29010
San Francisco, California
94129

If you are using Federal Express or UPS and need a STREET ADDRESS use this:

PhotoAlliance
616 Key Boulevard
Richmond, California
94805
415-425-5608

Entry Procedure and Requirements:

• Work:
All two-dimensional works, using any photographic process including digital and/or analog, are eligible for review.

• Registration:
Registration is a TWO-STEP process.
1- An initial review of portfolios submitted by CD with $40.00 non-refundable entry fee.
2- Sixty portfolios will be selected from these submissions for the weekend review. An additional $575.00 payment is then required for final participation if selected.

• Calendar:
Feb. 10th – CD Entry due
Feb 20th – photographers notified
March 9-11 – Portfolio Review in San Francisco

• Entry: JPEG images on CD only for application process.
Must be received by February 10th, 2012.
EARLY SUBMISSIONS ENCOURAGED.

See entry checklist on Entry Form.

Send all information to:
PhotoAlliance / Our World Portfolio Review
PO Box 29010
San Francisco, California 94129.

CD’s will be returned only if a self-addressed stamped
envelope of appropriate size and with appropriate postage is submitted with entry.

• Entry Fee and Procedure: A non-refundable entry fee of $40.00
for each 20 images.

• Digital Submission Requirements: Files should
be on a CD in JPEG format. Image size should be no larger than 2Mb or:
Horizontal – 8 inches
Vertical – 8 inches
Resolution 150 pixels/inch.
Files named as follows: Lastname_Firstname_imagenumber.jpg

Optional: submit an accompanying sheet with a list of name, title, date, medium, and dimension of each piece.

• Selection: A panel of jurors will be pre-screening all of the
entries. 60 photographers will be selected for the weekend
portfolio review. An additional fee of $575.00 is then required.

This will be the 6th annual event.

Partial list of reviewers- more to be added soon!

David Bayles, Artist, Educator, Author
Debra Bloomfield, Photographer & Educator
Linda Connor, Photographer & Educator, San Francisco Art Institute
Luis Delgado, Photographer, San Francisco
Janet Delaney, Photographer & Educator, San Francisco
Robert Dawson, Photographer & Educator, Stanford & San Jose State University
Taj Forer, Founding Editor, Daylight Magazine
Bruce Haley, Photographer, Carmel, Ca
Rebecca Horne, Photo Editor, The Wall Street Journal
Jason Houston, Picture Editor, Orion Magazine
Michael Itkoff, Founding Editor, Daylight Magazine
Ann M. Jastrab, Gallery Director RayKo Photo Center
Whitney Johnson, Picture Editor, The New Yorker
Anne Kelly, Associate Gallery Director, PhotoEye Gallery, Santa Fe, NM
Dennis Kiel, Chief Curator, The Light Factory Contemporary Museum of Photography and Film, Charlotte, NC
Stefan Kirkeby, Owner, Smith Anderson North Gallery
Aimee Le Duc, Gallery Manager, San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery
Christopher McCall, Director, Pilara Foundation, Pier 24, San Francisco
Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, Curator of Drawings, Prints, and Photographs, The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
Ted Orland, Artist, Educator, Author
Darcy Padilla, Photographer & Educator, San Francisco Art Institute
Kirsten Rian, Independent curator, writer, artist, Portland, OR
Thom Sempere, Director, PhotoAlliance
Rebecca Senf , Assistant Curator of Photography, The Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, AZ
Meg Shiffler, Director, San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery
Ada Takahashi, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco
Anne Veh, Art Consultant & Independent Curator
Lewis Watts, Associate Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz
Deborah Willis, photographer, curator, and educator, Chair, Department of Photography & Imaging,
Tisch School of the Arts, NY

Announcing the 2011 Portfolio Prize Finalists

Copyright by artist, clockwise from top-left: Sarah Palmer, Louie Palu, Lisa Lindvay, Andrew McConnell, Thibault Brunet

Thanks to all the photographers who took part in our annual Aperture Portfolio Prize contest this past year. Judges have gone through the submissions and after much deliberation, we’re pleased to announce the five finalists:

Lisa Lindvay

Andrew McConnell

Sarah Palmer

Louie Palu

Thibault Brunet

For almost a decade now, our contest has helped to identify trends in contemporary photography and bring the work of innovative and emerging artists to a wider audience.  This year, first prize is $3000 and an exhibition at Aperture Foundation.

Check back with us in the coming weeks as we get ready to announce the winner via email newsletter and our website and showcase their work. Don’t forget to check out the winning images from years past here. And remember, it’s never too early to start thinking about submitting for next year’s prize.

 

 

Human nature: a flood of last-minute entries for Awards

We’ve been receiving a flurry of anxious, worried messages via email from people who are uploading their photographs and multimedia for the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2011. They are worried because the upload system is unusually slow. Seems like our online system is experiencing a bit of overload, and that is creating unnecessary stress for a lot of talented people. Absolutely, the upload system is slower than usual today — especially for you multimedia artists with large files.

Sorry. But please don’t worry. handyman matters .

If you REGISTER and BEGIN you submission before 11:59 PM Pacific time today (September 17), you will be able to complete your submission for an additional 24 hours beyond the deadline, and your work will be included in the competition. BUT, you must register and begin the process before 11:59 PM Pacific time, to be able to continue beyond the deadline for the additional 24 hours.

Hope that helps. Don’t worry. Be happy. Visualize worldwide appreciation for your hard-earned work and art. portland or . 🙂

There are lots and lots of people out there who would LOVE to discover you and your work (including all of us at Lens Culture).

Submissions for Aphotostudent are Always Welcome

If you’re a photographer with a new body of work to show or if you’re a photography fan who has a new photo crush, you’re always welcome to submit it for posting on Aphotostudent. The majority of the posts on here for the past two years have showcased the work of world-renowned photographers. I’d like to devote more time to showcasing new work from emerging artists, but I need your help to do it.

Photo For The Week: Yamaguchi-san Peeling Chestnuts, 2008. James Luckett

Ways to reach me:

1: Feel free to email me at [email protected] but please write “aphotostudent submission” or something similar in the subject line so I don’t confuse it with the many requests for help I receive from Nigerian Royalty with millions of dollars stuck in limbo.

Please include a little bit about yourself and the body of work in the email. A bit of context always helps.

or

2: Head over to my Facebook page and post a comment on the most recent call for work.

Pretty simple!

Thank you in advance for any submissions you send. And, my apologies if I don’t reply to your submission right away. Sometimes emails stack up. It’s nothing personal.

I look forward to seeing lots of amazing work! – James Pomerantz

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The Point by Kirk Crippens and Michael Jang

Somewhere in the virtual world, I came across The Point, a new Blurb book that is the collaborative effort of Kirk Crippens and Michael Jang. I’m a big fan of both photographers, and I love the idea of working apart and together to create a significant project. Their statement and some of the book’s imagery follows, but as this is an on going project, there is surely more to come. Congrats to both photographers for a terrific project and book.

The Point is an ongoing collaborative project between Michael Jang and Kirk Crippens. Each spread in the book spans a decade, with one unlabeled photograph by each artist. The series began in 1999 when Jang, a native San Franciscan, became curious about the often-ignored Bayview/Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco. Sometimes referred to as The Point, this was the last remaining San Francisco neighborhood left untouched by developers. http://www.kirkcrippens.com/portfolio.html?folio=2011

In the process of taking pictures, Jang built trust with some of the residents and heard rumors of big changes on the horizon: the area was slated for massive redevelopment. He completed his work on the series in 2001, set aside the negatives, and per his usual practice, moved directly on to another project.

A decade later, Jang was making his way through his volumes of negatives when he discovered the Hunters Point work and began editing and printing it. During the same time he came across Kirk Crippens’ series on The Great Recession: The Dealership Wreck. He sent an email to Crippens that began, “I know you shoot change…” and he asked Crippens if he would consider continuing his Hunters Point series. It was an unusual proposition, but Jang had an intuition. So did Crippens, who began working in Hunters Point the next day.

He chose a church in the heart of the neighborhood and began attending services each week. The congregation immediately
welcomed him, making an effort to shake his hand and remember his name. Soon Crippens found himself describing the project to the pastor. Meetings were then coordinated with pillars of the community who invited him to photograph their homes and granted access to photograph some of the iconic rooms slated for redevelopment.

Although a core group of long-term residents remain, many changes have taken shape in and around the neighborhood since
1999, and the changes continue. Today, a vast wave of construction just north churns closer each day. The largest redevelopment site in San Francisco, the decommissioned Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, promises to convert 700 acres of The Point’s eastern waterfront into 10,000 residential units. Photography has also changed dramatically since 1999. When Jang completed his work in 2001 he was using film, processing with chemicals, editing on a light table, and printing at a color lab. By the time Crippens began working on the project he had the opportunity to make digital images, upload and edit on a computer, and print large format photographs in his home.

Still, much of the process Jang and Crippens employ in the creation of The Point remains the same. Relationships must be
formed, trust must be earned, and access must be granted.