Tag Archives: Elephant

Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 – Mark Chilvers solo show The Elephant until 28 October

Another quick post to point you to a solo show of work by London-based photojournalist Mark Chilvers. Aptly titled The Elephant – referring to Elephant and Castle, not the wild animal – Chilvers’ project centres on the residents and the housing estate in south east London.

©Mark Chilvers, Boy with the Orange Net, from the series The Elephant.
Showing at The Phoenix Gallery, Brighton until 28 October.

Chilvers adds: “The Heygate estate was completed in 1974 but has been already condemned before reaching its 40th birthday. The residents have been ‘decanted’ and new dreams have been promised to the future communities of what is now called The Elephant or South Central.” There’s even a blog Live from The Heygate set up by a former resident, but it has not been updated since 2011.

Filed under: Photography Shows Tagged: Mark Chilvers, south London, The Elephant

Tearsheet of The Day | Brent Stirton’s Blood Ivory in the National Geographic magazine

The latest National Geographic magazine issue, October 2012, has a cover story called Blood Ivory, written by Bryan Christy, an investigation linking religious art and ivory smuggling. The photographs are by the always brilliant Brent Stirton. The photo seen in the below spread is one of the most harrowing images of the series. You can view the entire edit online on the magazine’s website here.

pp. 34-35. National Geographic magazine, October 2012.
Photo © Brent Stirton
Caption on the spread: Bodies are what remain in Cameroon’s Biuba Ndjidah National Park after one of the largest mass elephant slaughters in decades. Armed with grenades and AK-47s, poachers killed more than 300.

Brent Stirton is a South African photographer based in New York and a regular contributor to National Geographic magazine. He is represented by Reportage by Getty Images. Stirton won a First Prize in the Nature Stories category in the 2012 World Press Photo for his Rhino Wars  series, which was also photographed for the National Geographic magazine.

TEAM Animals: Leopards and Chimps and Birds, Oh My!

Photographs of elephants deep in the Ugandan jungle, leopards in the Ecuadorian rain forests or jacquacus in a national park in Peru have never been seen like this before. Caught without the presence of a human photographer, animals were captured alone in their homes as part of an initiative by TEAM, the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network. Since 2007, TEAM has installed cameras in the middle of remote areas all over the world to collect data on local animals and climate with hopes of monitoring local trends in tropical biodiversity to provide early warnings about climate change.

The result is a series of candid black-and-white images that give a truly up-close look at animals in their natural habitats. The process begins with camera installation, itself a laborious task: fieldworkers go into the jungle or forest without trails, often walking for days to get to the desired location. After installing the camera in a predetermined location, the workers test its functionality and return 30 days later to retrieve the technology. Cameras take between 3,000 and 20,000 images at each installation site and record the time, date and moon phase, as well as the f-stop and exposure of the film, while workers later identify the species and group series.

TEAM hasn’t discovered any new species to date, but they have found animals previously unknown to a particular area. For example, in Costa Rica, the Central American Tapir was thought to be locally extinct from that site, but TEAM captured photos of the tapir with babies. Likewise, TEAM was able to confirm the presence of elephants in areas of Uganda thought to be without the mammal for years.

In the future, TEAM hopes to expand the number of sites from 17 to 40 locations. At a macro level, the organization disseminates information to global leaders and plays an active role in the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and the International Union for Conservation of Nature. On a local level, TEAM works with partners to develop products that help them manage their forests and parks, including changes in the abundance of species and overall animal communities. And only five years into the project, there’s no telling what information—and images—are yet to be discovered.

The Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring (TEAM) Network is a partnership between Conservation International, The Missouri Botanical Garden, The Smithsonian Institution and the Wildlife Conservation Society, and partially funded by these institutions and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. More information about TEAM can be found here.

Pictures of the Week, January 6 – January 13

From violence in Syria to the New Hampshire Republican primary and Uttar Pradesh’s giant stone elephant statues, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Photographer #271: David Chancellor

David Chancellor, 1961, UK, works and lives in South Africa. He studied at Kent Institute of Art and Design. His work, for which he travels extensively, can be best described as documentary reportage. His series Hunters, which will be released as a monograph in 2011, explores the relationship between man and animal. South Africa currently has the largest hunting industry. His series Elephant Story won a World Press Photo award in 2010. We see local villagers in Zimbabwe that fall upon the body of a dead elephant. Within two hours they reduce the large animal to bones. Besides his documentary work David also focuses on landscape and portrait photography and also photographed his wife and son. His photography is very clean, sharp and bright and takes us deep into the subject of human behaviour. Chancellor was named Nikon photographer of the year three times. The following images come from the series Hunters, Cotton and Elephant Story.


Website: www.davidchancellor.com

David Chancellor Joins INSTITUTE For Artist Management

Welcome to the IAM family David!

David Chancellor inherited his interest in photography from his father, and started taking photographs of the World around him from an early age. After an unfulfilling early career in banking, he studied photography at Kent Institute of Art and Design. He is currently based in Cape Town South Africa and travels extensively working on personal projects and commissions for a broad spectrum of clients, shooting documentary reportage and portraiture. His work is exhibited in major galleries and museums, and published Worldwide.

Named Nikon photographer of the year three times, he received a World Press Photo in 2010 for ‘Elephant Story’ from the series ‘Hunters’. A study of his wife and son was exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery London (2009), and the following year he won the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize (2010), at the National Portrait Gallery, with ‘Huntress with Buck’ from the series ‘Hunters’. In 2011 he was shortlisted for the Sony World Photography Organization Award.

David’s Website

David at INSTITUTE For Artist Management

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David Chancellor Joins INSTITUTE For Artist Management

Welcome to the IAM family David!

David Chancellor inherited his interest in photography from his father, and started taking photographs of the World around him from an early age. After an unfulfilling early career in banking, he studied photography at Kent Institute of Art and Design. He is currently based in Cape Town South Africa and travels extensively working on personal projects and commissions for a broad spectrum of clients, shooting documentary reportage and portraiture. His work is exhibited in major galleries and museums, and published Worldwide.

Named Nikon photographer of the year three times, he received a World Press Photo in 2010 for ‘Elephant Story’ from the series ‘Hunters’. A study of his wife and son was exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery London (2009), and the following year he won the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize (2010), at the National Portrait Gallery, with ‘Huntress with Buck’ from the series ‘Hunters’. In 2011 he was shortlisted for the Sony World Photography Organization Award.

David’s Website

David at INSTITUTE For Artist Management

Share/Save