Tag Archives: Elegance

Taking His Time: A Look Back at 50 Years of Joel Meyerowitz’s Photographs

The 1939 edition of Robert Frost’s Collected Poems contained an introductory essay that wasn’t in the first edition. In that article, entitled “The Figure a Poem Makes,” Frost wrote, “Like giants we are always hurling experience ahead of us to pave the future with against the day when we may want to strike a line of purpose across it for somewhere.”

Though he didn’t know it at the time, acclaimed photographer Joel Meyerowitz began hurling his own experiences ahead of him in 1962. While working as an art director at an advertising agency, Meyerowitz met photographer Robert Frank who was shooting a clothing brochure. Meyerowitz watched Frank move while he photographed, and he had an incredible epiphany. On the way back to the office, Meyerowitz walked the streets of New York for more than an hour. “I felt like I was reading the text of the street in a way that I never had before,” he says.

When he returned to the office, Meyerowitz told his boss, Harry Gordon, that he was quitting. He wanted to be a photographer. Gordon then asked him a crucial question: did he have a camera? The answer was no, so Gordon lent him a 35mm camera and Meyerowitz embarked on the great journey of his life.

Over the next 50 years Meyerowitz exhibited at the MoMA, received a Guggenheim Fellowship, published books and taught photography at Cooper Union. But there was always one place where you had a chance to run into him and become immortalized in his gargantuan body of work. Meyerowitz is, first and foremost, a street photographer. Though he has shot street scenes in France, Germany, Atlanta, Ohio and dozens of places in between, the chaotic streets of New York City make up his favorite studio. “Fifth Avenue is my boulevard,” he says. “No street in the world, and I’ve traveled a lot, has for me the kind of sexy, improvisatory collisions between elegance and lowness. You can see bike messengers and models, billionaires and hustlers, and it’s all out there every day.”

That first day with Robert Frank served as more than just a catalytic inspiration; it laid the foundation for how Meyerowitz would record street life. He bobs and weaves through the throngs of people, searching for that serendipitous moment that becomes a great photograph. “The way someone makes a gesture on the street or the way couples react to each other or the simultaneity of two things happening at the same time and the relationship between them,” are some of the elements he looks for. “It was the wonder of human nature and this incredible capacity for things to keep showing themselves to me,” he says.

Image: Joel Meyerowitz: Taking My Time (Phaidon Press, November 2012)

Phaidon Press

Joel Meyerowitz: Taking My Time (Phaidon Press. Limited Edition including signed print, November 2012)

When he is shooting on the street, there isn’t much time to contemplate each moment. “Photography takes place in a fraction of a second,” Meyerowitz says. “There isn’t a lot of time to think about things. You have to hone your instinct. You learn to hone that skill and timing so you’re in the right place at the right time.” Although he has made images that have moved audiences for decades, that has never been his true motivation. “I’m not out there to make another ‘great picture,’” he says. “I’m really out there to feel what it feels like to be alive and conscious in that moment. In a sense, the record of my photographs is a record of moments of consciousness and awareness that have come to me in my life.”

This year, the 50th anniversary of when he first took up the camera, Meyerowitz compiled hundreds of his favorite images for the two-volume collection, Joel Meyerowitz: Taking My Time (Phaidon Press). The project isn’t just a greatest hits collection. “It’s easy to make a book of your very best things and not necessarily have a narrative arc,” he says. “I wanted to stick strictly to the chronology as precisely as I could and show my own development.” The result is a visual biography of an artist who for half a century has snapped moments–fractions of seconds–and preserved them forever. Each tells a unique story that Meyerowitz has used to pave his life. Through the images of people and places and tiny moments in time, one can see a remarkable line of purpose he has created, one that runs fluidly across the experience of his life.

Joel Meyerowitz is a New York City-based photographer. Beginning Nov. 2, his work will be displayed in a two-part solo show at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York.

LightBox previously featured Meyerowitz’s photographs of the destruction and reconstruction at Ground Zero.

Desperate Cars by Sebastien Girard



The invention of automobiles and the invention of photography both promised a new engagement with the larger world. As gasoline powered engines and shutter driven cameras proliferated, the ‘far from home’ suddenly became visible. Photographers embraced autos and their presence has often become a breeding ground for meaning. From Lartigue’s early car pictures which feel futuristic and offer the promise of adventure to Robert Frank’s images of the car as rolling isolation booths. Cars have represented a multitude of themes from wealth and elegance to violence and rampant ecological destruction. One of my favorite titles from 2010, Sebastien Girard’s Desperate Cars takes a look at the autos around his suburban neighborhood in Toulouse, France.

There is little text at all in Desperate Cars, Girard opens with endpapers which plea ‘Save Their Souls’ – and follows with a concentration on the small damage and wear. Some have rolled in piss and shit; others have had their rear view mirrors smashed off; one has its bumper held on by bungee cords. It is all pretty minor – smashed windows and such – so one might ask ‘who cares?’

Other photographers have done major work on vehicles that have killed their passengers and have been twisted into shapes unrecognizable. My interest in Girard’s approach extends to what I see as one of photography’s flaws. There is a tendency to look to extremes and I find it a much more interesting problem to look at the subtle and make it hold your attention. I have in the past written about how I perceived Raphel Waldner’s work and I do find the descriptions seductive but this work seduces me in a much more nuanced way, for instance, Girard has chosen to describe his subject in the dark and from the same distance. Throughout Desperate Cars, the scale of the objects described are almost all similar. There is no medium shot or master shot etc – they are all close-ups. This unique strategy makes the book fell like you are revolving around the vehicles – navigating not so much a photograph, but navigating around an object. He sequenced these images with a flair for great pairings that complement the content and formal play as well.

As for the chips and bumps versus the great seven car pile-up fatality covered in crash-dust, this work is more about the wear of life rather than the moment of death. It is less common to die in a car crash than to have life simply chip away at you, like water does to stone overtime. These cars wear their damage like we wear our appendix scars.

Desperate Cars was self-published in an edition of 500. The quality is near perfect from the printing to the hand binding done by Van Waarden in the Netherlands. A signed and numbered limited edition with a print is also available. Sebastien Girard will be presenting his books and work at this year’s International Photobook Festival in Kassel Germany from June 1-5th at Documenta-Halle.

Desperate Cars by Sebastien Girard



The invention of automobiles and the invention of photography both promised a new engagement with the larger world. As gasoline powered engines and shutter driven cameras proliferated, the ‘far from home’ suddenly became visible. Photographers embraced autos and their presence has often become a breeding ground for meaning. From Lartigue’s early car pictures which feel futuristic and offer the promise of adventure to Robert Frank’s images of the car as rolling isolation booths. Cars have represented a multitude of themes from wealth and elegance to violence and rampant ecological destruction. One of my favorite titles from 2010, Sebastien Girard’s Desperate Cars takes a look at the autos around his suburban neighborhood in Toulouse, France.

There is little text at all in Desperate Cars, Girard opens with endpapers which plea ‘Save Their Souls’ – and follows with a concentration on the small damage and wear. Some have rolled in piss and shit; others have had their rear view mirrors smashed off; one has its bumper held on by bungee cords. It is all pretty minor – smashed windows and such – so one might ask ‘who cares?’

Other photographers have done major work on vehicles that have killed their passengers and have been twisted into shapes unrecognizable. My interest in Girard’s approach extends to what I see as one of photography’s flaws. There is a tendency to look to extremes and I find it a much more interesting problem to look at the subtle and make it hold your attention. I have in the past written about how I perceived Raphel Waldner’s work and I do find the descriptions seductive but this work seduces me in a much more nuanced way, for instance, Girard has chosen to describe his subject in the dark and from the same distance. Throughout Desperate Cars, the scale of the objects described are almost all similar. There is no medium shot or master shot etc – they are all close-ups. This unique strategy makes the book fell like you are revolving around the vehicles – navigating not so much a photograph, but navigating around an object. He sequenced these images with a flair for great pairings that complement the content and formal play as well.

As for the chips and bumps versus the great seven car pile-up fatality covered in crash-dust, this work is more about the wear of life rather than the moment of death. It is less common to die in a car crash than to have life simply chip away at you, like water does to stone overtime. These cars wear their damage like we wear our appendix scars.

Desperate Cars was self-published in an edition of 500. The quality is near perfect from the printing to the hand binding done by Van Waarden in the Netherlands. A signed and numbered limited edition with a print is also available. Sebastien Girard will be presenting his books and work at this year’s International Photobook Festival in Kassel Germany from June 1-5th at Documenta-Halle.

Stephen Shore – Dublin

Stephen Shore’s photographic work came to maturity and early recognition in the 1970s, a period when his native America was wearied by war and years of civil unrest. Its wit, elegance, and formal rigour made welcome order out of images that looked casual and arbitrary; echoing the methodology of contemporary photorealist painters, Shore’s approach was a cross between straight documentary and conceptual art. Uncommon Places, probably his best-known and most influential series of photographs, includes – among many others – images of a motel room, a pancake breakfast, a rainbow over a parking lot, and a billboard on a country highway showing a snow-capped mountain. Sometimes described as a sequence of deadpan shots of banal subjects, Uncommon Places is actually deeply rooted in the artist’s subjectivity. Ductless Mini Split . north dakota foundation repair . This is literally and figuratively true: the photographs are diaristic, but more importantly they also bear clear traces of his attitude to the world, which is surprisingly affectionate for one so determined to show no emotion whatsoever in his photographs. Custom Jewelry . Stephen Shore’s work has been shown all around the world in major galleries and museums. This exhibition at the Douglas Hyde Gallery Dublin, the first time Stephen Shore’s work has been shown in Ireland, was selected by the artist; it comprises photographs from various series and from every period in his career.

Sharon Harper

© Sharon Harper

There are many ways to photograph the sky at night, and most place it within the context of the landscape. This is a different view, the series One Month, Weather Permitting by Sharon Harper, snapshots of pieces of sky at night with long exposures so the starts become like lines on a blackboard. The surrealism and elegance of the images is very pleasing.

The other series Moon Studies and Star Scratches is even more creative and appealing to me. Not sure how the images are done, but probably it is a play of multiple exposures that create images that are credible and surreal. And beautiful, of course.

© Sharon Harper

© Sharon Harper


Adam Bartos

© Adam Bartos

Sorry for the gap in posting here the last week. It has been quite hectic for me these days. To compensate I share with you the excellent work of Adam Bartos. His work is exceptionally elegant, he has the keen ability to compose  the different elements of the image in ways that create the perfect perspective.  It is the elegance of visualization the quality that I love most of his images.

© Adam Bartos