Tag Archives: edmund clark

Farewell 2011, hello 2012!

And so another year passes. We hope you have all had a happy, healthy holiday season and here’s to a prosperous 2012! As ever, thanks to everyone who has supported and worked with 1000 Wordsduring this past year. Here are some of our organisation’s highlights:

-the appointment of a board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark


-the announcement that our sister-site, the 1000 Words blog, was named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts’ Photography Blog of The Year Award


-two 1000 Words Workshops with Anders Petersen and Erik Kessels that took place in the beautifully evocative medina of Fez, Morocco


-1000 Words editors, Tim Clark and Michael Grieve’s
participation in a panel discussion on “galleries” for photography with Linda Berlin and Toni Cederteg, Library Man; and Kristin Bråten, Director, Gallery Riis in association with Objectiv in Oslo, Norway

-curation of a slideshow featuring Anna Linderstram, JH Engström and Viviane Sassen at Łódź International Festival of Photography, Poland


-three issues of 1000 Words Photography Magazine, based around themes of Aporia, Hidden and Thereness, released in February, May and October respectively


-sponsoring The Salon Photo Prize 2011, in which thirty-five early-career photographers were exhibited at Matt Roberts Arts on Vyner Street, East London with one exhibitor, EJ Major, winning the selectors’ prize supported by 1000 Words consisting of £1000 and a subsequent solo exhibition


-Tim Clark, Editor in Chief at 1000 Words, joining the Academy of Nominators for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize and also co-judging FreshFacedandWildEyed2011, the fourth annual competition for recent graduates organised by The Photographers’ Gallery, alongside Edmund Clark, Photographer; Louise Clements, Artistic Director, QUAD and Format International Photography Festival; and Brett Rogers, Director, The Photographers’ Gallery


Re runs: Edmund Clark

This post first ran in 2009…

The Houston Center for Photography recently opened an exhibition titled Prime Years. I was intrigued by this often under-exposed subject, as much of the work showcased in the fine art world spotlights a more youthful population. Curator Fernando Castor R. selected 13 photographers who are/were exploring the many aspects of aging. From the editorial to the personal, the work in Prime Years depicts centenarians, artists, relatives, and other individuals enjoying, enduring, and living their lives beyond the age of 60.

Edmund Clark is a well regarded British photographer with a reputation for “combining strong ideas with an ability to work in sensitive situations and with people on the margins of society.” He works as an editorial and a fine art photographer; his book, Still Killing Time, about long term incarceration, was a finalist at the NY Photo Awards and received an honorable mention at the IPA Awards. Edmund’s project, Centenarians, is featured at HCP.

Statement for Centenarians: These people were born before television was invented, before cars were mass marketed, before the Titanic was built, before the Russian Revolution or the First World War. They are all over 100 years old and the last of the pre-technological age. For some, Queen Victoria was still on the throne when they were born. A hundred years later the telegram marking their centenary came from her great, great granddaughter.






Another project, titled No Place to Go, takes a look at asylum seekers in Britain that flee persecution in one country only to experience discrimination in another.

Images from No Place to Go





Ochi Reyes

All images © Ochi Reyes

Last Saturday, I met up with my fellow judges and the participating photographers from this year’s Fresh Faced and Wild Eyed at The Photographers’ Gallery offices for the follow-up portfolio reviews and slideshow. Now in its fourth year, the competition celebrates the breadth and dynamism of photographic work produced by recent graduates from across the UK. Following an online application process, the 20 selected finalists were exhibited in an online gallery. To see the list of those photographers who were included, and their respective works click here. This year’s judges were Edmund Clark, photographer; Louise Clements, Artistic Director, QUAD and Format International Photography Festival; and Brett Rogers, Director, The Photographers’ Gallery and yours truly, (Editor-in Chief, 1000 Words Photography Magazine).

At some point during one session with a particular finalist, Ochi Reyes, a voice in my head started to channel the words “She’s got something special” for these indelible self-portraits hit me hard. Their dry humour and deadpan compositions and style remind us of better-known female practitioners from the past such as Jo Spence but also speak in the more contemporary photographic language of say Marina Abromovic or even Catherine Opie. Poignant and political, Reyes’ work examines the influence of the other on the self. She is interested in how our identities are culturally constructed, and her photography explores how conceptions of gender distinctions, love and desire are imposed on our bodies from outside. More often than not, the characters in her photographs are actors, and she questions how we become actors in our own bodies, playing out the roles already scripted and prepared for us. Her photographs question the nature of representation, often exploring the mise-en-abîme effect of using one sort of representation inside another. In her artist statement for the project Revelations, shown above, she writes:

“My own body and thoughts are the basis for a critical examination of society’s expectations to do with identity, surrounding issues of age, gender and family. All of the thoughts scratched onto my skin are related to not fitting in and the feeling of anxiety arising from this displacement. The surface of my body portrays how these thoughts, which come from outside, find their way not only into my psyche but also into my own body image.

My skin condition, dermographism, means that the surface of my body can be inscribed as if it were a slate. In the same way that early morning thoughts linger for a short while before they disappear, leaving a slight trace that remains throughout the day, my skin slowly goes back to normal over the course of the day and is ready the following morning to be re-inscribed. It is not only this malleability of the skin, that interests me, but also the idea that skin absorbs information from the outside world; it is the interface between the self and others, both separating us and becoming the physical link between our bodies.”


Ochi Reyes was born in Madrid in 1974. After studying at Murcia School of Art she moved to London and completed a degree at Westminster University in Photographic Arts in 2010. In 2005 her project Photographs of an Amorous Discourse was shortlisted in the category Descubrimientos in PhotoEspaña. She is currently studying for an MA in Photographic Studies at Westminster University. Definitely one to watch.

Rhubarb Rhubarb presents The Crossing

“Are you going to stay where you are, live in the past, or cross over into the new world offered to you through technology, tenacity and a mind-shift around money, dependency, what is possible and how it can be achieved?”

The Rhubarb team -Rhonda Wilson, Lorna-Mary Webb, Sebah Chaudry,  to name the ladies who organized the successful International Review for 10 years in Birmingham- are rethinking of different ways of bringing photographers an event that will benefit them considering the shifting terrain of the contemporary image world. 

With “The Crossing”, Rhubarb bring together a great line up of inspiring speakers for one day:

  •  London based agent David Birkitt will talk about new markets. His company DMB Media is managing the career of brillant contemporary photographers such as Simon Roberts, Morad Bouchakour, WassinkLundgren …
  •  Photographer Edmund Clark will talk how he has made his documentary practice into a fine art success. Ed Clark latest project  ”Guantanamo:If The Light Goes Out” as well a book published by Dewy Lewis Publishing has been exhibited  in galleries and institutions and acquired for museum collections
  • Christian Payne is freelance mobile media maker who also specialises in social media and photography: OurManInside.com
  • Michael Donald has been photographing men who have scrore a goal in Fifa World cup and co-directed and produced  ”I Scored a Goal in the FIFA World Cup Final”, a series of short films and a one hour documentary
  • Benjamin Chesterton & David White are Duckrabbit, a UK based production and training company. The talentuous duet produces photofilms and publishes the very opiniated and often hilarious duckrabbit blog. They will talk about the benefits of making work into a multimedia platform and how making stills into films could open up a whole new market.

“The Crossing”, a one-day artist development seminar takes place on 26th March at The Theatre , The Custard Factory, Gibb Street, Digbeth, Birmingham . B9 4AA. Admission is 20£ ( 23,50 €). Visit Rhubarb website for booking informations and programme.

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