Tag Archives: Editorial Work

Unfiltered: Photographers React to Instagram’s New Terms

It was a holiday surprise that few anticipated, and even fewer appreciated, as Instagram changed its terms/conditions of service on Monday, Dec. 17. Before the announcement, 2012 had been a landmark year for the photo-sharing service: in April, the service was purchased by Facebook for $1 billion, seeing a proliferation of users. Publications like TIME, National Geographic and the New Yorker have integrated Instagram in their editorial work — TIME has twice featured Instagram photographs on our cover this year — once for our Wireless Issue and another to lead our print coverage of Hurricane Sandy.

Instagram’s strength lies in the application’s no-fuss, integrated and intuitive interface — camera software tied to your phone (and now your Facebook account) that allow users to visually document everything from important world events to their breakfast. But as photographers adopted Instagram for creative and even professional purposes, questions arose about ownership, property rights and profitability.

According to the changes, effective January 16, 2013, any photograph posted on Instagram’s service can be repackaged and sold by Instagram for advertising purposes without the user’s knowledge or consent.  In addition, by agreeing to the new terms, users are responsible for any legal claims that may result from the promotion or use of their images.

Long story short: Instagram can use your content to increase their revenue, and if a legal claim is brought against the company regarding how these images have been used, you (the user) might be responsible for the damages.

Adam McCauley

UPDATE (Tues, 5:25pm EST): Instagram has posted a statement responding to user feedback.

LightBox will be updating this post throughout the day as more photographers weigh in. What do you think? Let us know in the comments below.

Alexi Hobbs

Some photographers are born story tellers.  They make work that feels like a visit with an old friend, or a relative who is sharing memories of a life lived–a scrapbook of images that tell our stories.  Alexi Hobbs is one of those photographers. He has the gift of the narrative and brings us along on his insightful explorations of place and family.  His project, Hunters and Heirs, looks at family traditions and shared experiences that stem from a time of need, not want.

Alexi is a fine-art and editorial photographer from Montreal. He has shot editorial work for publications such as Time, Monocle, Dwell, enRoute and Afar. His prints have been fortunate enough to have graced the walls of galleries in Canada, the United States and even a museum in Russia. Most recently he has been selected as a winner of the Magenta Foundation’s 2012 Flash Forward Emerging Photographers competition.

Hunters and Heirs: In 1941, my grandfather, Antonio ‘Pit’ Allard deserted the army to avoid fighting in World War II. He spent four years in hiding on the Gaspesian peninsula and four winters isolated in the forest, working alone as a lumberjack, living off beans and lard. He broke the monotony by trapping hare and shooting partridges. This was a time when hunting was a means to a very vital end, not a weekend hobby. It was a way of life and a source of food.  

When the war ended, Pit settled down in the city, started a family and moved on. However, he never gave up hunting. It reminds him of who he is, where he comes from and why he is still here today.

My grandfather is known for his storytelling. His stories, based both in historical fact and myth, have become part of our family’s identity. They tell of time spent in the wild and many of them find their origin in these hunting trips. In October of 2009, I followed him into the woods, not only to document part of my family’s history, as a photographer, but also to become part of it by actively participating in what would undoubtedly be added to the library of folktales, recounted at the next family gathering. I went to document my family during this transition and to remember who we are, where we come from and ultimately, the reason we are all here. 

Review Santa Fe: Carolyn Drake

Over the next month, I will be sharing the work of photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  

Carolyn Drake ‘s project, Uyghur, documents Xinjiang, China in a variety of ways–by photographing objects as a way of visually journaling her thoughts and feelings, collaborating with the people she encountered in the province and asking them to reinterpret her photographs through drawing and text, and by showing us what was and what is.  This three tiered way of capturing place gives us a rich tapestry of a province in transition.

“When I was young, people were poor.  Now they are getting richer from jade and from the government  A lot of people are looking for jade on the Black Jade River and the White Jade River, looking for luck.  If they can’t find a good piece of jade, they can sell it for a lot of money.  The Chinese people love it.  Digging is a hard job.  It’s like gambling.  If you have luck you can find it, if you have no luck, you just dig.”

Carolyn received her BA in Media/Culture and American History from Brown University, and later studied photography at ICP and Ohio University. She now splits her time between self-driven documentary projects and the magazine editorial work from which she makes a living. Carolyn is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright fellowship, and the Lange Taylor Documentary Prize, among other awards, and is currently putting together her first book, Two Rivers. She is based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Uyghur:Xinjiang – China’s vast far western province – has changed drastically since I began photographing Uyghurs there in 2007. Traditionally living in agricultural villages and trading towns on the edges of the Taklimakan Desert, many Uyghurs have been forced off of their land and out of their courtyard homes into urban housing projects. They are displaced by millions of Han workers migrating west from the Chinese interior as government policy tightens its grip on this province which borders several newly independent, Islamic leaning countries.  

While Uyghurs continue to aspire to cultural and political autonomy, their language and way of life are transforming. Ive been drawn back over and over. The attraction comes partly from a sense that these changes ought to be viewed from more perspectives, especially ones that consider Uyghur interests. Its also a personal attraction to the desert landscape, communal culture, vivid streetlife, and hospitality I saw there. 

Feeling the limits of what could be expressed with my camera, I eventually began to look for meaning other ways. I learned about the significance of dreams in Islam and asked people to describe their own remembered dreams. I collected and photographed objects left in the dust of demolition. I carried a journal which I asked people to leave messages in.

And I made prints of my photos, asking people to draw their own pictures on top of them, and recording interviews with those who were willing to take the risk. The project has become a narrative collage of these disparate elements.

“This is a picture of my son.  Its the street I was born on. It is a beautiful street. My son drew his dream.  A person running after a thief.  My wife wanted to draw but she thinks she didn’t draw it well.”

“Twenty years ago it was very nice, there were a lot of springs, clean water, grasses, and a lot of trees.  I was always going swimming.  It was a very beautiful place.  But now it’s all buildings, and not much green.  There are so many people living here now, it’s like flies.”
” All of my brothers and sisters and my mother were at the village killing a camel together for the Kurban festival.  I was the butcher, taking off the meat. I work as a tour guide.  I miss home when I go to the other provinces.  Because I’m a Muslim.  Not a really good Muslim, but I’m a Muslim and I believe one day I will become a really good Muslim.  In other provinces you can’t find good Muslim good and people are strangers, they are speaking a different language and you can’t understand them.  I can understand Chinese, but it’s kind of tiring.  I get homesick very easily.”
“A man who regards himself as a Muslim should learn to ride a hourse, to shoot an arrow, and learn to swim.”
“I didn’t study at school because I love my mother. Life wasn’t good for her because my father left. We had six children in my family and I am the youngest so I had a lot of pressure on me.  I got some money every day and gave the money to her.  Then she spent the money for my brothers and sisters to study at school. The whole time, I was a shoe brusher in front of the mosque.  In front of the mosque, one small chair.  If anyone came, I’d brush their shoes.  Then I’d give the money to my mom.”

Photo News – 16th Bradford Fellowship Photography scheme calls for applicants for the first time

The Bradford Fellowship in Photography is the Museum’s longest standing cultural partnership…
In every case the scheme has contributed significantly to both the development of the Fellow’s practice and provided a unique opportunity for students in Bradford to interact with significant artists. We are proud of its legacy and excited to announce a call for the 16th Bradford Fellow.”
Greg Hobson, Curator of Photographs at the National Media Museum.

For the first time in its 27-year history the 16th Bradford Fellow in Photography scheme, which includes a £10,000 award, a major exhibition and the opportunity to work with higher education students, has been opened to applications.

AIM
To support mid-career photographers in their professional activity and works with the artist and the Fellowship partners to share knowledge and learning about the practice of photography. Specifically, “to enable a photographer/artist to explore their personal artistry and ideas to produce a new body of work”. Also, for the artist to work with students at Bradford College and University of Bradford to give an insight into the artist’s working practice and to encourage the development of the students’ own practice.

DEADLINE
3 September. Full details can be found at Bradford Fellowship in Photography.

WHO CAN APPLY
Applicants should be photographers or artists working with photography, be established in their field and have a history of exhibitions, publications, commercial and/or significant editorial work.

Applicants should have a track record of teaching at FE/HE levels and be fully committed to delivering the teaching aspect of the Fellowship in Bradford.

We welcome collaborative applications and proposed artworks created by individuals or groups of artists. Please note if a collaborative proposal is selected the fee for the project be equally divided between the artists taking part.

Applicants are required to be UK residents.

HOW TO APPLY
Submissions should be sent by post only. Include the following information in both digital (on CD) and printed formats. Project proposal (800 words max), technical requirements, project schedule, artist CV, artist statement and any supporting material (written documents). There is an application fee of £15 (cheques only) for each submission. Please make payable to ‘National Media Museum’.

ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP
The Bradford Fellowship – a partnership between the National Media Museum, University of Bradford and Bradford College – has previously been based on nominations. This year it’s an open call.

The Fellowship was established in 1985. There have been 15 previous recipients of the Fellowship, including Fay Godwin, Donovan Wylie, Neeta Madahar, Sarah Jones, Paul Graham and Nick Danziger.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Bursaries, Visual Artists Tagged: 16th Fellowship Photography, Bradford, Greg Hobson, National Media Museum, photography bursary

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong

Mom Applying Make-Up,
Clinton, Connecticut, 2011
From the Two Roofs series
Website – TonyLuong.com

Tony Luong was born in Connecticut in 1987. His family moved to the United States two years before he was born to escape the Vietnam war. He graduated with a BFA in photography from the New England Institute of Art in 2010. His work mainly revolves around his family's background and what it means to be a first generation citizen. His work has been exhibited throughout Boston and through several online publications. His editorial work has appeared in publications such as Hemispheres Magazine, Financial Times, London and Vibe Magazine, among others. He recently published a small book of photographs from his ongoing project Two Roofs. Tony lives in Cambridge, MA where he is a freelance editorial and fine art photographer.

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong

Mom Applying Make-Up,
Clinton, Connecticut, 2011
From the Two Roofs series
Website – TonyLuong.com

Tony Luong was born in Connecticut in 1987. His family moved to the United States two years before he was born to escape the Vietnam war. He graduated with a BFA in photography from the New England Institute of Art in 2010. His work mainly revolves around his family's background and what it means to be a first generation citizen. His work has been exhibited throughout Boston and through several online publications. His editorial work has appeared in publications such as Hemispheres Magazine, Financial Times, London and Vibe Magazine, among others. He recently published a small book of photographs from his ongoing project Two Roofs. Tony lives in Cambridge, MA where he is a freelance editorial and fine art photographer.

Minor Characters: Paolo Morales, Ana Lerma, and Emily Holzknecht

I thought I’d celebrate some terrific thesis portrait work that recently opened in Boston. Paolo Morales, Ana Lerma, and Emily Holzknecht all explore their own interior relationships as they search for a photographic relationship with strangers. Inconsequential characters take on leading roles in their exhibition, Minor Characters.

Minor Characters is a BFA thesis exhibition on view at the Art Institute of Boston Gallery at University Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Ana, Emily and Paolo are three portrait photographers in search of connections. Lerma’s photographs strangers on the streets of Boston and New York in search of a reflection of a photographic encounter. Holzknecht’s portraits of strangers as well as those close to her explore a relationship between the photographer and the photographed. Morales’ pictures of acquaintances physically interacting explore relationships of struggle and power. The exhibition is on view from March 20-24, 2012.

Paolo Morales is a photographer and BFA candidate at the Art Institute of Boston. He has exhibited work at the Detroit Center for Contemporary Photography, Kings Highway Library, C Street Gallery, Trevor Day School and Gallery 44, among others. His editorial work has appeared on the cover of College Magazine. In 2010, he curated a show entitled Select Gender at the Farmani Gallery in Brooklyn. He lives in New York and Boston.

Emily Holzknecht was born and raised in northern New Jersey and is currently a BFA candidate at The Art Institute of Boston. Her interest in humanity and narrative lead her to develop a strong interest in the photographic portrait and its power to simultaneously reveal and obfuscate. Her work has been exhibited at the Photographic Resource Center and Laconia Gallery in Boston.

Ana Lerma is a contemporary photographer. Raised in the suburbs of Las Vegas, NV she moved to Boston to pursue a photography degree at The Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University.

Photographer #435: Bharat Sikka

Bharat Sikka, 1973, India, is a documentary photographer who also concentrates on editorial and advertising work. He moved to New York to study at the Parsons School of Design where he earned a BFA in photography. His personal work concentrates on contemporary visions of India. His recent series Matter blends studio, street, landscape and portrait photography. Combined they form a portrait of the “new” India. It is Bharat’s vision of a fast changing country. His narrative editorial work often show females in film-like settings, photographed in a unique, documentary style. Amongst his numerous editorial clients are Vogue India, Another magazine, Time, ID and Wallpaper. His work has been exhibited throughout the world as the Rencontres d’Arles photography festival and the Helsinki Art Museum. He works and lives between India and Europe. The following images come from the series Matter, Salvador do Mundo and various Fiction portfolios.

Website: www.bharatsikka.com