Tag Archives: Edition Artist

Ewa Zebrowski: Finding Wyeth

Ewa Zebrowski‘s new book project takes a look at the quiet world of a master painter, revealing a sense of place, light, and New England sensibilities. Ewa’s wonderful limited edition artist’s book titled, Finding Wyeth, captures images of the Olson House located on the Cushing Peninsula in Maine, where for 30 years Andrew Wyeth created over 300 paintings, including his famous painting, Christina’s World.  The book comes in an edition of 20 and is available through Ewa: [email protected]


 I walked in, went upstairs, and suddenly I was startled.
There was another figure standing there.
It was me in a dusty mirror…
The reason I did it was that I wanted a portrait
of the dryness of the place,
that special sort of dryness of dead flies
that are left in a room that’s been closed for years.
                                                      Andrew Wyeth
                                           on painting The Revenant, 1949
The Olson House
 Andrew Wyeth spent a lot of
time 
some three  decades (1939-1968), at the Olson House (which belongs to the Farnsworth Art Museum)on the Cushing Peninsula in Maine, talking, sketching, painting, finding inspiration.


Alvaro and Christina Olson, the bother and sister who lived there, became his friends.  He used an upstairs room as his studio, where he painted over 300 paintings.  It was the view from a third story window that inspired his well known/iconic painting, Christina’s World.


I visited the empty house during the summer of 2010, a house filled with tangible emotion and light.  A house pregnant with stories and secrets.

       A bouquet of tangled wildflowers,
       tiny seashells in a bird’s
nest,
       empty glass canning jars,
peeling wallpaper
and silence,
the residue of so much emotion
in this old weathered wooden house
on a hill,
filled with light
and vanished dreams,
the black horse wandering lost,
the apples ripe on the ground.
                                                        
EMZ

Zoe Crosher Named LACMA Art Here and Now Artist

Since 1963, LACMA has supported local emerging artists, first with the Young Talent Award, then in 1986 with the Art Here and Now (AHAN) program. This year, one of the two recipients of the prestigious award is Aperture-featured photographer Zoe Crosher. Carefully selected by LACMA’s Modern and Contemporary Art Council (MCAC) as well as the museum’s Modern and Contemporary Art curators, nine unique images from Crosher’s The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois have now been acquired for LACMA’s permanent collection.

 

Zoe Crosher is an artist living in Los Angeles. Her work has been exhibited in Vancouver, Rotterdam, Los Angeles, and New York City, including a billboard project with LAXART (2010) and inclusion in the 2010 California Biennial. She has been working on Los Angeles-inspired, site-specific photographic projects since 2001. Her monograph Out the Window (LAX) examines space and transience around the Los Angeles airport, and a series of four monographs on her newest project, The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois, are forthcoming from Aperture Ideas. Crosher has just been announced as a 2011 recipient of LACMA’s prestigious Art Here and Now: Studio Forum (AHAN) program to support acquisitions by emerging Los Angeles-area artists. She holds a B.A. in Art & Politics from UC Santa Cruz, and an M.F.A. in Photography & Integrated Media from CalArts.

 

The project  The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois is also a print-on-demand limited-edition artist book. It is the first in a four-volume set by the artist, and part of Aperture Ideas: Writers and Artists on Photography, a series devoted to the finest critical and creative minds exploring key concepts in photography, including new technologies of production and dissemination.

 

Identical in structure, each volume offers an alternate perspective on the archive of Michelle duBois, an enigmatic collection of images bequeathed to the artist by the subject and compiler. In each subsequent volume, Crosher configures a new set of identities and meanings for this ephemeral archive of photographic detritus through a selection of unique sets of images, reinterpretations of photos seen in previous volumes, as well as new texts.

 

Zoe Crosher’s The Unraveling of Michelle duBois is a reconsidered archive culled from crates, boxes and albums consisting of endless flirtatious smiles, tourist shots, cheesecake mementos and suggestive poses in every film type and size. This limited-edition artist book includes a unique to the volume 8 x 10-inch signed and numbered print. The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois was featured in Aperture magazine, issue 198.

 

 

Asian Contemporary Art Week – Tomorrow: A Conversation with Jungjin Lee and Vicki Goldberg

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Aperture Foundation would like to thank everyone for coming out Thursday, March 24 for the opening reception of the exhibition presented in collaboration with sepiaEYE, Jungjin Lee: Wind

Tomorrow,  a book signing and conversation between the Jungjin Lee and Vicki Goldberg will take place at 2 pm at Aperture Gallery, coinciding with the ten-day annual festival Asian Contemporary Art Week (ACAW).

Wind, a solo exhibition by internationally acclaimed Korean photographer Jungjin Lee features twenty-six stunning panoramic landscapes. A limited-edition artist book, as well as the artist’s first trade book, co-published by Aperture and Sepia, accompany the exhibition. Beautiful in their composition and physical execution, Lee’s images present metaphors for an interior state of being and the forces that shape it. Lee’s landscapes are imbued with an elemental vastness, at once powerful and serene.

As in her earlier work, Lee’s printing technique utilizes a liquid photosensitive emulsion brushed on handmade Korean mulberry paper. The texture of the paper and the gestural marks of the brushstroke create a unique, painterly effect that further emphasizes the fusion of image and photographic intent. In the accompanying book’s text, photography critic Vicki Goldberg writes:

“In these photographs, subject is subservient to content. The subject may be a giant fog that eats a mountain and nibbles away the hills, or a cloud that has invaded a forest and advances steadily, softly, like a determined angel. The content is Jungjin Lee’s response to what she saw, shorthand notes from her spirit.”

Exhibition on view:

Thursday, March 24-Thursday, April 14, 2011

Click here to purchase Wind, the book of Jungjin Lee’s exhibition.

Click here for more information about the book signing and conversation between the artist and Vicki Goldberg