Tag Archives: Duration

Photo Show – Phil Fisk captures Everyday People CircusFest 2012 at The Roundhouse London

© Phil Fisk

Phil Fisk’s Everyday People – a series of commissioned portraits of circus performers  – is on show in the foyer at The Roundhouse for the duration of the CircusFest (29 April). Fisk puts a spin on contemporary circus performers and portrays them in unusual, everyday settings, for example, the contortionist spilling out of a washing machine in a Brixton launderette.

© Phil Fisk

If you’re heading to the north London venue or passing by, drop in and take a look. The private view is tonight with a performance by Compagnie Rasoterra.

© Phil Fisk

For a behind-the-scenes look at the work, including a post on the hanging of the 80-inch prints in the foyer, visit Fisk’s blog.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Shows, Portraiture Tagged: circus performers, CircusFest, Everyday People, Phil Fisk, portraits, The Roundhouse

What Matters Now? Website Now Live! VISIT. SUBMIT. PARTICIPATE.

What Matters Now? is now online and open for use! We encourage you to use the project’s website to submit your ideas, see the schedule, and learn more about the hosts and participants. For the duration of the exhibition in progress, the website will be constantly updated to reflect the physical changes in the gallery space, along with nterviews, photographs and and texts from the wide variety of participants. Most importantly, your submissions will be posted daily for thought and discussion.

About What Matters Now?

Submit your ideas

See the schedule

Learn more about the Hosts and Participants

What Matters Now? Website Now Live! VISIT. SUBMIT. PARTICIPATE.

What Matters Now? is now online and open for use! We encourage you to use the project’s website to submit your ideas, see the schedule, and learn more about the hosts and participants. For the duration of the exhibition in progress, the website will be constantly updated to reflect the physical changes in the gallery space, along with nterviews, photographs and and texts from the wide variety of participants. Most importantly, your submissions will be posted daily for thought and discussion.

About What Matters Now?

Submit your ideas

See the schedule

Learn more about the Hosts and Participants

Rona Chang

© Rona Chang

Moving Forward, Standing Still
The cumulative effect of people on their environment motivates me to record an extended portrait of society in a simple and quiet manner. Photographs bridge local and global experience, the gulfs between present and past, self and world. In Moving Forward, Standing Still, each photograph depicts an arrangement of figures in the landscape, interacting as if on a stage for a marked occasion. As a photographer, I””ve become the audience to which these dynamic moments are revealed. – Rona Chang


Photographer, Filmmaker Tim Hetherington Interview

Very tragic to learn that British Photographer Tim Hetherington was killed ….

Well, war is — it is a very slippery thing to try and get out any truisms about war,” Hetherington said. “I mean, Tim O”Brien, the writer, you know, said the same thing. You know, war is hell, but it”s more than that. And rather than kind of lay down any kind of definitiveness, I just wanted to — to show the texture of it. And that meant not just photographing just the combat, but, as you say, the guys, their time off, when war is often very boring. And it”s boredom punctuated by sheer terror. And I wanted to capture all of that.

see the video interview here.


In Making a Portrait

© Henri Cartier-Bresson. Portrait de Camus, 1947

If, in making a portrait, you hope to grasp the interior silence of a willing victim, it”s very difficult, but you must somehow position the camera between his shirt and his skin. Whereas with pencil drawing, it is up to the artist to have an interior silence.

Henri Cartier Bresson


“École nationale de la chanson” by Benoit Paillé

Great series by Benoit Paillé. Take a look also to Under Night, very nice indeed.

© Benoit Paillé.

© Benoit Paillé.

© Benoit Paillé.