Tag Archives: Decade

Andrew Meredith, Hong Kong Island

Andrew Meredith, Hong Kong Island

Andrew Meredith

Hong Kong Island,
China, 2012
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

Andrew Meredith, Oslo, Norway

Andrew Meredith, Oslo, Norway

Andrew Meredith

Oslo, Norway,
, 2010
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

Jen Davis featured in Abe’s Penny August 2012 Edition


“…Abe’s Penny is a lit mag paired down to the most essential elements: image and text. Each issue consists of one story divided into four parts and printed on postcards. ‘They are not photographs and they are not texts,’ The New Yorker says of Abe’s Penny‘s unique publishing style, ‘but a combination of both, tangible objects with a heft and significance of their own.’”

Abe’s Penny’s August 2012 edition features images from Jen Davis, whose decade spanning “Self Portraits” series was featured in reGeneration 2: Tomorrow’s Photographers Today, the second book in the esteemed series shining a spotlight on the next generation’s rising stars.

›› Shop Jen Davis’s limited-edition print Untitled No. 32, from the “Self Portraits” series
›› Buy reGeneration 2: Tomorrow’s Photographers Today

 

Maggie Steber’s ‘Rite of Passage’ and the Gift of Memory

It was almost a decade ago that photographer Maggie Steber realized that her mother, Madje Steber, was not going to get better. Although her mother had always lived independently, her dementia had gotten to the point where that would no longer be possible.

“I started photographing my mother as soon as I realized I was going to have to move her out of her home in Austin,” says Steber. “She would never let me photograph her before. When her defenses were down—and I’m sure some people will say that’s not right—I started photographing her.”

The project was originally intended as purely personal, a way for Steber to cope during her mother’s illness and a way for her to remember her mother in later days. There was also video, filmed as Madje Steber’s condition deteriorated, which would allow the photographer to remember how her mother moved and sounded. But along the way, says Steber, she realized that the project could be more than something she would dust off and look at when she wanted to remember. After a shorter project created for AARP and then a period of time away from the work after her mother’s death in 2009, Maggie Steber (in collaboration with MediaStorm) made a film, Rite of Passage, which will premiere June 11 at Galapagos Art Space in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Steber’s film involves photos and video taken at difficult moments and at beautiful ones—moments when Steber says her mother came out of herself and lost her shyness. Her mother’s reluctance to be photographed was, she thinks, a result of her youth and beauty passing; “it was so lovely to have these pictures where she was happy and beautiful again,” she says. The photographer hopes that those transcendent moments will teach viewers that illness comes in waves, that stages will pass and—perhaps most of all—that if you are willing to be a “warrior” on behalf of your loved one, they can have a positive end-of-life experience. Nobody told her how to navigate doctors and medications, and part of her goal is to help others with the research that accompanies a loved one’s death. “If you can stick with it,” she says, “there’s this rather remarkable gift at the end.”

Maggie Steber

Madje Steber naps with her favorite toy, a stuffed kitty, in her room at Midtown Manor, an assisted living facility, in Hollywood, FL. in 2007.

Part of that gift is knowing that you’ve done what you could. Steber says that she was aware from a young age that her mother, the single mother of a single child, would die one day and that she had a responsibility to be there for it. And she was: “I was able to hold my mother while she took her last breath,” she says.

The other part is meeting your parent all over again, with all the barriers down. Steber says that, as her mother lost touch with the past, they lost touch with the mother-daughter relationship. “They don’t recognize you anymore. They fall in love with somebody else. They think the caregiver is their daughter,” she explains. “That’s a little startling, it hurts a little bit, but I started to see her as Madje.” It’s difficult for children to see their parents as individuals separate from themselves, but Madje became a whole woman to Maggie, someone who told marvelous stories, someone who had been a scientist and would have wanted her last days to help ease medical confusion, someone who could have become a friend if they had started out as strangers. “I just fell in love with her,” says Steber. “I know I would have just really enjoyed knowing this woman.”

Steber’s photographs and videos were made in order to preserve just one woman’s memory of a mother, but she says she hopes that her decision to share will help other people decide to look for those gifts of memory. “It doesn’t come easily, but it’s worth it,” she says. “You have to live with that for the rest of your life and I just think if you can live with the happier memories, the discovery and seeing somebody blossom even as they’re disappearing right in front of you, you have that to hold onto. And maybe it is the best thing you’ll ever do.”

Maggie Steber’s Rite of Passage premieres June 11 at Galapagos Art Space, along with Phillip Toledano’s A Shadow Passes, another film from MediaStorm about the loss of a loved one. More information about the event is available here.

Andrew Meredith, Vardo, Norway

Andrew Meredith, Vardo, Norway

Andrew Meredith

Vardo, Norway,
, 2011
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

Announcing the 2011 Portfolio Prize Finalists

Copyright by artist, clockwise from top-left: Sarah Palmer, Louie Palu, Lisa Lindvay, Andrew McConnell, Thibault Brunet

Thanks to all the photographers who took part in our annual Aperture Portfolio Prize contest this past year. Judges have gone through the submissions and after much deliberation, we’re pleased to announce the five finalists:

Lisa Lindvay

Andrew McConnell

Sarah Palmer

Louie Palu

Thibault Brunet

For almost a decade now, our contest has helped to identify trends in contemporary photography and bring the work of innovative and emerging artists to a wider audience.  This year, first prize is $3000 and an exhibition at Aperture Foundation.

Check back with us in the coming weeks as we get ready to announce the winner via email newsletter and our website and showcase their work. Don’t forget to check out the winning images from years past here. And remember, it’s never too early to start thinking about submitting for next year’s prize.

 

 

Stephen Ferry Recipient of First Tim Hetherington Grant

On Tuesday, World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch awarded the inaugural Tim Hetherington Grant to Stephen Ferry, an American photojournalist, for his project “Violentology: A Manual of the Colombian Conflict.” Established in honor of Hetherington, a photojournalist and filmmaker who died this April while covering the war in Libya, the €20,000 grant is given to help a photographer complete an existing project that focuses on human rights issues.

“Violentology” was chosen among a field of 222 applicants from 56 countries. The project examines the history of the guerilla war in Colombia and encompasses a decade of Ferry’s images from the conflict-torn nation. As part of the grant—and in a fitting tribute to Hetherington’s multimedia platforms—Ferry’s project will be shown as an exhibition and book, with selected chapters available for free download as a PDF.

Stephen Ferry is a Colombia-based photojournalist whose work has received numerous honors from World Press and Magnum Foundation among others. See more of his work here and more about “Violentology” here.

Cover Stories

I had coffee with a photographer friend this morning who encouraged me to share my good news on LENSCRATCH. I try to steer away from using this platform to showcase my own work, but hey, how often does one see their image on the cover of PDN?

So, forgive me, but I’m pretty excited.

Almost a decade ago, I received my first magazine cover–on SHOTS Magazine. It was utterly exciting for me, as I was tethered to my life as a wife and mother and had few photographer friends, certainly none that I actually knew in the flesh. I had brief correspondences with (via snail mail) photographers I admired through SHOTS, but no real community, and no where to share my excitement. But it made me feel validated that someone (that would be Russell Joslin), recognized something in my work worth sharing–and that was huge in my small world.

One day, a few weeks after the SHOTS cover came out, I recieved a post card in the mail. The handwriting was that of someone old, and it said:

dear girl-
your photograph Hotel Fiorita moves my heart soft and silent.
“voici mon secret il es tres simple; on ne voit bien qu’avec le cœur. L’essentiel est invisible pour les yeux.”

signed c.l.

To translate:
“Here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.” (from The Little Prince)

That post card still hangs directly over my computer as a reminder to shoot with the heart, not the head. I have no idea who “c. l.” was or is, but if you are reading this post, thank you for taking the time to share that with me. And while I’m at it, thank you Russell Joslin, and the staff at PDN, in particular, Amber Terranova.