Tag Archives: David Lachapelle

Interviews and Talks | October 2012

VII Photo’s International Director Nick Papadopoulos shared practical advice  for young photographers at a Canon talk in Perpignan… Canon Professional Network put the main points on their website… Includes good tips also from some of the VII members…Worth reading  by photographers young and old in my opinion…

Nick Papadopoulos (VII) : practical advice for young photographers (CPN)

Really good hour long talk Lynsey Addario gave at Side Gallery in Newcastle earlier this autumn…

Lynsey Addario (Side Gallery Vimeo) Lynsey Addario discussing her photographic practice and ‘Veiled Rebellion’ exhibiton at Side Gallery, which looks at the lives of women in Afghanistan. | 55mins

Prison Photography’s Pete Brook interviewed VII photographers who shot for the agency’s and NYC based advocacy group Think Outside The Cell’s collaborative project…

Ed Kashi   (Prison Photography)

Ron Haviv  (Prison Photography)

Ashley Gilbertson (Prison Photography)

Jessica Dimmock  (Prison Photography)

Stephanie Sinclair on NBC photoblog on her child brides project

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair (NBC)

Stephanie Sinclair (World Press Photo on Vimeo)

Ron Haviv (WBEZ on Soundcloud)

Joachim Ladefoged (Digital Pro Photo magazine)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Emaho Magazine)

Gary Knight and co talked about their Bosnia book in Perpignan… CPN shares the points on their site…

Gary Knight, Jon Jones, Tom Stoddart and Rémy Ourdan revisit Bosnia (CPN)

Peter Turnley (YouTube)

Pete Souza (MSNBC)

Teun Voeten interviewed about his book Narco Estado on the BBC World Service (Panos)

Terric talk by David Burnett at PhotoShelter’s recent Luminance event.

David Burnett (PhotoShelter)

Jeremy Bowen (Guardian)

Reuters photographers Jorge Silva and Carlos Garcia Rawlins on photographing Hugo Chavez (YouTube)

Donna Ferrato interview in burn magazine…

Conversation with Donna Ferrato (Burn)

Alessio Romenzi (LA Times Framework blog)

Katrin Koenning (Time Lightbox Tumblr)

Peter diCampo : Everyday Africa (NYT Lens)

Poulomi Basu (Theworld.org)

David LaChapelle (PDN)

Phaidon interviewed Peter van Agtmael relating to his W. Eugene Smith Grant awarded project Disco Night September 11…

Ten Questions for photographer Peter van Agtmael (Phaidon)

Mark Power : From Poland, With Love (themuse.com)

Steve McCurry video, on location in Ethiopia (Phaidon)

Bruce Gilden (ASX)

Jake Chessum (A Photo Editor)

Video interview with William Klein to coincide with his exhibition at Tate Modern in London…

William Klein (Youtube)

Daido Moriyama (Youtube)

Simon Baker, the Tate Modern’s Curator of  Photography and International Art on William Klein + Daido Moriyama: Double Feature (Lightbox)

Susan Bright (YouTube)

Good Simon Norfolk interview…I don’t always agree with what he says,  but I do like the fact he doesn’t mince any words…

Photo © Simon Norfolk. From the project “Burke + Norfolk”

Simon Norfolk (FK Magazine)

Joel Meyerowitz (Youtube)

A Conversation with Richard Misrach and Kate Orff : Petrochemical America (Aperture)

Alejandro Cartagena (A Photo Editor)

Interview with Jason Eskenazi on “Wonderland: A Fairytale of the Soviet Monolith” – A 10-Year Odyssey Around the Former Soviet Union (erickimphotography)

A Conversation with Danny Wilcox Frazier on Facing Change: Documenting America (Leica blog)

The National photo blog has been a great find…

AP photographer Manu Brabo talks about his time in Syria and covering conflicts (The National)

Daniel Etter : Witnessing Syria’s Descent Into War (Newsweek Photo Dept Tumblr)

A conversation with Neville Elder-Photographer and Film-maker (Broadbentius blog)

Ewen Spencer in Guardian’s ‘best shot’ series…

Photo © Ewen Spencer

Ewen Spencer’s best photograph: MCs at a UK garage rave (Guardian)

Ewen Spencer (BBC)

Dana Popa (Photo Parley blog)

Photo © Franco Pagetti

Franco Pagetti – From Fashion to the Frontline (Emaho Magazine)

Sebastian Rich : From war zones, photographer brings scars and searing images (NBC)

Teru Kuwayama (PhoNar)

Benjamin Chesterton (PhoNar)

Victor Cobo (Foam)

Niall McDiarmid (Document Scotland)

Maroeskja Lavigne (Word Magazine)

Martin Parr introducing us to his new book…

Martin Parr presents Life’s a Beach (Aperture Vimeo)

Photo Raw magazine’s video interview with Parr…

Martin Parr (Photo Raw)

Alec Soth (LayFlat.org)

Simon Roberts (YouTube)

Danfung Dennis (YouTube)

Brian Smith: Secrets of Great Portrait Photography (PhotoShelter webinar)

Brian Smith on How to Take Better Portraits (B&H blog)

I don’t consider myself a gearhead, but I do sometimes enjoy reading about what others have in their bags…

John Stanmeyer : What’s The Kit (Photographer’s blog)

From Photo Brigade…

In My Bags – by Robert Caplin (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Dominick Reuter (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Matt Eich (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Eric Thayer (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Keith Bedford (Photo Brigade)

David Bailey‘s India: the long click goodbye (Guardian)

Interview with Maciej Dakowicz on his “Cardiff After Dark” book Published by Thames & Hudson (erickimphotography)

Maciej Dakowicz (BBC)

Jim Mortram’s Small Town Inertia (BBC)

Tom Wood (BBC)

Tom Wood (Guardian)

Laia Abril on the Fabrica Artist Residency (PDN)

Mario Testino interview: the man who makes models super (Guardian)

Mikhail Baryshnikov (NYT Lens)

Icons of Tomorrow: Contemporary Fashion Photography

Susie Smoking 1998/2011, © Nick Knight

Exhibition on view through June 2, 2012.

Christophe Guye Galerie
Dufourstrassse 31
8008 Zurich, Switzerland
+41 44 252 01 11

Photographers such as Nick Knight, David LaChapelle, and Terry Richardson all straddle the fence between commercialism and fine art. The practice of fashion photography is highlighted with international stars at the Christophe Guye Galerie, where a group of artists known as the Icons of Tomorrow, embraces their subject matter using compelling conceptual ideas and provocative, colorful approaches.

The allure behind this type of photography is investigated by these nine renowned photographers that have shaped the genre, to see where it falls between art and commerce.

Featured artists: Miles Aldridge, Kate Bellm, Guy Bourdin, Ina Jang, Nick Knight, David LaChapelle, Walter Pfeiffer, Terry Richardson, and Albert Watson.

Nick Knight appeared in Aperture issue 197.

– Documentary Photography: Truth and Consequences

Photography, and especially documentary photography, has been used as a tool because it can tell the truth. Photographs present proof in a tangible form, which makes it easier for us to find what relevance and meaning the subject has to our own lives.

Being thrust into the digital era, however creates a host of ethical dilemmas for photographers, editors and the general public. A multitude of questions arise: who and what should be considered reliable sources? what should be digitally altered and how drastically? how responsible is the media to get and tell the truth? Consequently, I believe that both the documentary photography genre and the photojournalism industry should be held to stricter standards. These photos and stories are still supposed to represent reality, unlike advertising or fashion photos which are intended to sell a product.

It is only a guess, but when a photographer such as Ron Haviv is making a statement through one of his photos, it is a drastically different statement than someone such as David LaChapelle . The intent of the photograph may be the same (to be viewed by others) but in viewing, vastly different emotions are evoked. In fact, I think that the photographic process differs vastly for documentary photography and commercial photography. The environment in which the photographs themselves are taken is often posed for commercial photography. Documentary photography relies on something that is a bit more organic (in most cases). This does not mean that one is of more value, but that their purposes are varied. And as a result, for documentary photography, a moment of truth should be apparent from what emanates from inside the frame.

From a technical (and perhaps artistic) standpoint, getting the shot right without needing or utilizing digital tools shies away from taking the easy way out. Sometimes it is a matter of luck, but more often than not, it is a combination of elements such as precision and vision. Well renowned photojournalist Henri-Cartier Bresson told photo editors that he dictated which shots were not to be altered or even cropped. This attitude lends a certain authenticity, an honest reality.

Furthermore, one must take into account the varied perspectives involved in any type of photography: there is the photographer’s truth, the subject’s truth and the viewer’s truth. Each has the ability to derive varying truths and alternatively, the ability to manipulate the truth. Herein lie ethical standards that fall mostly on the shoulders of the photographer. How does she or he behave behind the lens? In front of the computer or editors? What professional responsibilities are expected of him or her?

Many of the questions and issues raised here are unanswerable, a gray area, or require on-going philosophical debates. But being inundated with images on a constant basis, it would be comforting to think that the photographs and projects that are produced of the ‘documentary photography’ order are presented in a way that is honest to what the photographer saw and what the subject was experiencing in that moment.

Perhaps it is naive or even unrealistic given technology’s advancements, but I believe that despite the celebrity obsessed, media-crazed world that we live in today, a sense of truth should remain intrinsic to documentary photography.

Do you agree?