Tag Archives: Current Project

George Holroyd, Untitled

George Holroyd, Untitled

George Holroyd

Untitled,
Milan, Italy, 2012
Website – GeorgeHolroyd.com

George Holroyd was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. When he was a child, George's family relocated often, transporting him to a variety of cities and towns throughout the eastern half of the United States. From an early age, he developed a sense of being a visitor to these new places, rather than a resident. That feeling of transience stayed with him and he has traveled extensively throughout his adult life, including to Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. He now lives in Paris with his wife, Sarah. His current project, And I, presents a diaristic set of images, made in collaboration with the artist's most faithful companion, a progressive neurological disorder known as Essential Tremor.

Review Santa Fe: Jay Muhlin

Review Santa Fe participant Jay Muhlin is a Philadelphia photographer with a focus on artist books. His work explores themes of loss, intimacy, comfort, anxiety, and masculinity. What
results are multivalent narratives, visual threads that not only “define his subjects with empathy,
but also seek emotional truth.”

Jay received a BFA in Photography from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts  and recently completed his MFA in Transmedia/Art Photography at Syracuse University. His work has appeared in various editorial publications worldwide and he has recently completed residencies at the
Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester NY, The Millay Colony for the Arts in
Austerlitz, NY and at Contemporary Artists Center at Woodside in Troy NY.
Jay teaches courses at Syracuse University, Salem Community College and
was a visiting faculty member at Bennington College in 2011.

 His current project, a book titled Guilty Pleasures, looks at finding comfort during winter. The images speak through visual pun and metaphor. Muhlin often takes diaristic liberties and embraces serendipity, building images that refer to something other than what is named or described in the frame: something intangible such as longing, intimacy, and solitude. Strung together are lists of simple comforts and tactile groupings which all contrast with the harshness that winter serves. 

Relief is offered through humor as it transforms coping into a joy that makes moving forward more meaningful. When this work is exhibited Muhlin uses an installation format, creating a quasidomestic space. Images are hung salon style in gaudy white frames with numerous different dimensions. The artist’s couch is available for sitting and viewing his book dummy, draped with a quilt embroidered with a wintery image from the project. Greeting cards, newspapers, and balloons- all ephemera to be given away, distributed, disturbed, or forgotten.

Review Santa Fe: Jay Muhlin

Review Santa Fe participant Jay Muhlin is a Philadelphia photographer with a focus on artist books. His work explores themes of loss, intimacy, comfort, anxiety, and masculinity. What
results are multivalent narratives, visual threads that not only “define his subjects with empathy,
but also seek emotional truth.”

Jay received a BFA in Photography from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts  and recently completed his MFA in Transmedia/Art Photography at Syracuse University. His work has appeared in various editorial publications worldwide and he has recently completed residencies at the
Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester NY, The Millay Colony for the Arts in
Austerlitz, NY and at Contemporary Artists Center at Woodside in Troy NY.
Jay teaches courses at Syracuse University, Salem Community College and
was a visiting faculty member at Bennington College in 2011.

 His current project, a book titled Guilty Pleasures, looks at finding comfort during winter. The images speak through visual pun and metaphor. Muhlin often takes diaristic liberties and embraces serendipity, building images that refer to something other than what is named or described in the frame: something intangible such as longing, intimacy, and solitude. Strung together are lists of simple comforts and tactile groupings which all contrast with the harshness that winter serves. 

Relief is offered through humor as it transforms coping into a joy that makes moving forward more meaningful. When this work is exhibited Muhlin uses an installation format, creating a quasidomestic space. Images are hung salon style in gaudy white frames with numerous different dimensions. The artist’s couch is available for sitting and viewing his book dummy, draped with a quilt embroidered with a wintery image from the project. Greeting cards, newspapers, and balloons- all ephemera to be given away, distributed, disturbed, or forgotten.

Dave Jordano, Hakeem’s Room

Dave Jordano, Hakeem’s Room

Dave Jordano

Hakeem’s Room,
Detroit, 2012
From the Detroit – Unbroken Down series
Website – DaveJordano.com

Dave Jordano received a BFA in photography from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit in 1974. In 2009 a major exhibition of his work on African American storefront churches was held at the Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL accompanied by his book, Articles of Faith, published by the Center for American Places at Columbia College. Jordano has exhibited nationally and internationally and his work is held in several museum, corporate, and private collections, most notably The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Detroit Institute of Arts. His current project, Detroit Unbroken Down, documents the cultural and societal identity of his hometown Detroit. Jordano is represented by the Clark Gallery in Lincoln, MA, Michael Mazzeo Gallery, New York, NY, and the Stieglitz 19 Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium.

Jonathan Blaustein, My deer head

Jonathan Blaustein, My deer head

Jonathan Blaustein

My deer head,
Taos, New Mexico, 2011-12
From the MINE series
Website – JonathanBlaustein.com

Jonathan Blaustein is an artist and writer based in the mountains of Northern New Mexico. He studied Economics and History at Duke University, before receiving an MFA in Photography from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn in 2004. He has exhibited his work widely in the United States, and his photographs reside in many important permanent collections, including the Library of Congress, the State of New Mexico, the Brooklyn Museum, MOPA, the UNM Art Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.His work focuses on the intersection of economic theory, globalization, commodification, and culture in the 21st Century. His last project, The Value of a Dollar, was published by the New York Times in 2010, and subsequently went viral on the Internet. Ultimately, the conceptual photographic project was seen by millions of people around the world, creating dialogue about the manner in which food represents deeper issues of wealth, class, power and health. His current project, MINE, debuted in Santa Fe in May of 2012, and was published online by the New York Times. Jonathan also writes about photography and culture for A Photo Editor, a blog for the global photography industry.

Mike Rebholz, Hardin Road (Montana 87)

Mike Rebholz, Hardin Road (Montana 87)

Mike Rebholz

Hardin Road (Montana 87),
Billings, Montana, 2006
From the American Beauty series
Website – MikeRebholz.com

Mike Rebholz (b.1954, Milwaukee Wisconsin). Is an architectural photographer living and working in Madison, Wisconsin. He studied at the Milwaukee Center for Photography and has taught at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. His photographic interests are vernacular architecture, the built landscape and portraiture that explores the confluence of shelter and American culture . His projects range from documentation of ice fishing in Wisconsin. the changing Midwest landscape and vernacular architecture as a reflection of idiosyncratic individuality. His solo exhibitions Speaking in the Vernacular and 10 Weeks: Ice Fishing in Wisconsin have exhibited at the Michael H. Lord Gallery in Palm Springs California and the work from 10 Weeks is represented in the Chicago Project at Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago Illinois. His current project American Beauty is a examination of the intersection of industrial scale agribusiness, energy production and existing American land culture and the resulting changes in the American way of life.

Neighborhood Blues: Kensington, Philadelphia

Philadelphia is well known as a city of neighborhoods. Walk a half-mile down the block and everything changes; the faces, the shops, the streets themselves are different. Photographer Jeffrey Stockbridge, who lives in the city, says that there is one neighborhood of which many Philadelphians are only vaguely aware: Kensington, in the city’s northeast, an area with high poverty and crime rates. Stockbridge has been photographing the denizens of Kensington and recording their stories since the winter of 2008, as part of a long-term project that he hopes to conclude this summer.

Stockbridge had been working on a project documenting the interiors of abandoned houses in Philadelphia when he first met the people who would become the subjects of the current project, the people who spend their days hanging out on Kensington Avenue. “I met some very interesting individuals that I had originally shied away from,” he says. “I just began going to the Avenue with my camera and photographs from my previous projects and introducing myself to people and talking to them about the avenue, and that’s when I started to get a sense of the environment.”

With both portraits and environmental photography, Stockbridge aims to capture the sense that a neighborhood like Kensington unites people, for better or worse, through the harsh realities of everyday life.

And Stockbridge says he has found that the people of Kensington are eager to share their stories. “The people I photograph are not trying to hide anything,” he says. “They know that everyone looking at them knows what they’re doing, whether they’re working as a prostitute or they’re selling drugs or they’re an addict.” And in the years he has been photographing them, Stockbridge has become much more comfortable on the Avenue—and the Avenue has become comfortable with him. People approach him when he shows up with a camera. “They usually ask me if I can take their picture too,” he says, “and say, ‘well, I got a story too.’”

One of the stories that “hits the nail on the head,” in Stockbridge’s words, is that of the two sisters “Tic-Tac and Tootsie,” pictured in the gallery above. The photographer says that the similarities and differences between the twins—the echoed hunches of their shoulders, the slight smile on only one face—highlight the contrasts inherent in life on the Avenue. The people in his photographs struggle and survive.

The project is the photographer’s first experience with pairing audio and visual recordings—both of which can be seen on the blog he maintains for the project—and he has also begun asking his subjects to write in a journal that he hopes to display alongside their photographs. He says that the collective history, as written and told by the residents of Kensington, is a necessary counterpart to his desire to use available light and chance meetings to communicate something about the human condition. Although the project now feels almost finished to Stockbridge, he says that it’s a topic that one could photograph forever—and that he may return, in a decade or so to see what has or hasn’t changed. “Every week there’s new people on the avenue,” he says.

And those people will, undoubtedly, have their own stories to tell, in their own voices. “I’m really just trying to show,” says Stockbridge. “I’m not trying to define. I’m just trying to say: ‘look.’”

Jeffrey Stockbridge is a Philadelphia-based photographer. See more of his work here.

The Silence of Others: Exploring Islamophobia Through Images

“Osama! Osama!”— yelled a pair of complete strangers, as photographer Bharat Choudhary walked to his apartment from the University of Missouri campus in 2009, where the photographer was pursuing a Master’s degree in photojournalism. Islamophobia is a personal issue for Choudhary, who is an Indian Hindu.

“I had a big beard at that time,” adds Choudhary, who used the incident as inspiration for his current project, which documents Muslim life in the United States and England. Titled The Silence of Others, the series captures similar situations and their effects on the project’s participants, as well as the lives of young Muslims and the communities to which they belong.

Choudhary traces the origins of the idea back to his time as a student in India, where he worked with CARE India in Ahmadabad in 2004. The organization provided rehabilitation to victims of ethnically charged violence, who lost limbs or were paralyzed in the 2002 riots in the Indian state of Gujarat. The images he saw there formed an experience that Choudhary says “will always be there with me.”

He began working on the project in the Midwest, where he documented stories in small towns across Missouri and Illinois, as well as larger cities like Chicago. Choudhary is continuing the second phase of the project in England, broadening the geographic reach of the body of work and expanding it as a platform to help Muslims and non-Muslims understand each other.

Though the growing body of work represents a variety of life stories—a Missouri couple’s efforts to establish the state’s first Mosque, a Caucasian woman’s conversion to Islam and the development of Muslim communities in Chicago, London and elsewhere—Choudhary says he has found similar themes of alienation and ostracism of his “Others” on both sides of the Atlantic. But it’s precisely the challenge of breaking through their silence that captivates Choudhary and pushes him to continue the project.

“It’s finding the right kind of people who would be willing to talk and be photographed—that is one thing that keeps me awake all night,” Choudhary says. “It’s been quite an interesting journey so far.”

Bharat Choudhary is a photographer based in London, England. The Silence of Others is currently supported by a grant from the Alexia Foundation for World Peace and Cultural Understanding. Select images are on display at ”Moving Walls 19,” an exhibition opening at the Soros Foundation in New York on Dec. 1.