Tag Archives: Curated

London Art Fair 2 for 1 ticket offer

London Art Fair is one of the UK’s premier destinations for modern British and contemporary art, bringing together 129 leading galleries from the UK and overseas.

Alongside the main fair, two curated sections focus on younger galleries, new work and contemporary photography; Art Projects and Photo50. Photo50 is an exhibition of contemporary photography featuring fifty works, curated this year by Nick Hackworth, Director of the excellent Paradise Row gallery. Entitled, A Cyclical Poem, it will bring together the work of a number of British photojournalists and documentary photographers from the 1970s to the present day including Brian Griffin, Paul Hill, Sirrka-Lisa Kontinen, Dorothy Bohm, Marketa Luscakova and Chris Steele-Perkins. The exhibition is an elliptical meditation on the idea of historical change, instances separated by eras, of congruence and difference; it considers what has changed and what has stayed the same.

The fair keeps its doors open late on Thursday 17 January, providing you with the opportunity to look at the work by over 1,000 artists whilst enjoying complimentary drinks, talks and performances.

1000 Words readers can purchase 2 for 1 advanced tickets for this evening; just enter code LAF467 when booking to activate your discount. Offer valid until midnight 31 December 2012. Book here!

The Space Between Exhibition at the PRC

The Photographic Resource Center in Boston is opening a new exhibition, The Space in Between, featuring the work of Stefanie Klavens, Daniel Feldman, and Lynn Saville.  Curated by Erin Wederbrook Yuskaitis,the Program & Exhibition Manager of PRC, it runs from November 15th – January 10th, 2012.

Erin Wederbrook states:  The Space in Between focuses on societal built environments in urban settings. The images capture supposedly empty or vacant scenes in public spaces where humans are present without being pictured. The very absence of human subjects forces the viewer to contemplate the space in between these human-made structures. While firmly rooted in the 21st century, these photographs also portray a
timeless feel, as if the artists froze the frame at the initial moment
of abandonment, preserving a particular constructed expression of
culture for generations to come.



 Daniel Feldman, Stefanie Klavens, and Lynn Saville explore these issues through architectural images that very clearly display what humans are capable of while also revealing a deeper level of cultural vulnerability.

images by Stefanie Klavens

images by Daniel Feldman

images by Lynn Saville

Brighton Photo Fringe Photo Stroll Part Two – Richard Glynn, PhotoVoice and Brighton ArtsFORUM 2.0 with Farnham student Catherine Symons

Welcome to the second part in Catherine Symons’ Photo Stroll on the press view for Brighton Photo Fringe 2012.

RICHARD GLYNN – LOST WALTZ

Richard Glynn – Lost Waltz. Photos © Catherine Symons.

Situated on the North Lawn, St Peter’s Church is this intriguing outdoor exhibition by Richard Glynn, a Wideyed exhibition curated by Human Endeavour.

In 1869 Josephine Bowes and her husband decided to make a grand house, which was also designed to be a place for their large artwork collection to be shared with the people of Teesdale, County Durham. However, the Bowes didn’t live to see the completion of this project, and although some rooms were open to the public, some were incomplete.

“The images are of a space in transition; an unfulfilled dream about to find new life, but tinged with the stillness and sadness of what might have once been.” From Wideyed website.

There is something captivating about this exhibition. There is the busy traffic of Brighton all around, and yet, encapsulated within the lawn, is the stillness of the subjects in these photographs. On until 18 November.

PHOTOVOICE – HAVING OUR SAY TOO

PhotoVoice, Having Our Say Too. Photos © Catherine Symons.

PhotoVoice is an organisation which was set up to encourage and allow people from socially excluded groups to express themselves through photography and story telling.

The exhibition is currently displayed in one of the Photo Fringe’s hub spots – The Redroaster café. Showcased work is from a two-year project working with young people from around the UK who have been sexually exploited.

Many of the participants had never used a camera before so PhotoVoice set up  workshops. What was so apparent, when talking with the young people about the work they made, was how much it helped them and how much they enjoyed working with PhotoVoice and photography. “It gave me something to focus on and I would definitely like to continue with photography.”

The hard-hitting subject of the images displayed in this busy café highlight how this is an every day occurrence and one that should not be ignored.

Over the next year, PhotoVoice will deliver three more projects and combine them to make a DVD. This DVD will be a resource for practitioners working with young people, supported by The National Working Group for Sexually Exploited Children and Young People. Ended 20 October.

Brighton ArtsFORUM 2.0

Female Fighters, Amelie Shepherd. Photos © Catherine Symons.

Brighton Media Centre hosted a selection of work from Brighton ArtsFORUM facilitators and presenters as part of Brighton Photo Fringe.

Artists include Murray Ballard, Peter Bennett, Martin Everett, John Ferguson, Emer Gillespie, Fiona Harvey, Beatrice Haverich, Julia Horbaschk, Vanessa Jones, Catherine Larré, John Mallett, Jacqueline McCullough, Ellen Montelius, James Reid, Amelia Shepherd, Mariya Ustymenko and James Withey.

Brighton ArtsFORUM aims to facilitate and support critical debate, where artists can articulate and discuss the concerns of their work in progress.

Included in the exhibition is photographer Amelia Shepherd with her series Female Fighters. Portraits of female fighters are presented alongside audio interviews on a video screen. The women have all been documented in the moments straight after fighting or sparring. The idea behind Amelia’s work came from her own participation within the sport, as she comments upon misconceptions of female fighters. Ended 17 October.

Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Festivals, Uncategorized Tagged: Amelia Shepherd, Brighton ArtsFORUM, Brighton Media Centre, Brighton Photo Fringe, Catherine Symons, Female Fighters, Josephine Bowes, Lost Waltz, PhotoVoice, Redroaster café., Richard Glynn, The Bowes Museum, The National Working Group for Sexually Exploited Children and Young People.

I’ll Be Your Mirror curated by Jennifer Shaw

I’ve done a lot of writing and thinking about the idea of photographing family.  Never has the photo landscape been so rich with the genre of looking at family. As participant observers, living along side our subjects, we have to separate reality from artistic interpretation and the results are sometimes humorous, sometimes insightful, and sometimes incredibly poignant.  Even though these stories are personal, they are indeed, universal.  Photographer Phil Toledano has had millions of visitors to his site, Days with My Father, that looks at his father’s journey into dementia–a telling fact that we are hungry for visual stories about those under the same roof.

Curator Jennifer Shaw (dynamo Photo Nola organizer and a photographer in her own right) has just curated an exhibition on family for the HomeSpace Gallery in New Orleans.  I’ll Be Your Mirror, opening October 13th and running through November 8th,  is an exploration of family through the eyes of seven contemporary photographers:Angela Bacon-Kidwell, Laura Burlton, Warren Harold, Aline Smithson, Gordon Stettinius, Phil Toledano and Alison Wells. “All document a creative collaboration between family members and all are bound by a profound intimacy. As fathers, daughters, mothers, sons, these seven brave photographers reveal the beauty, chaos, heartbreak and humor inherent in family relations.”

Jennifer states: When Kevin Kline invited me to curate a show for HomeSpace I decided to use the opportunity to have a conversation about family, a topic both universal and entirely personal. I’ll Be Your Mirror brings together the work of seven photographers I deeply admire. It has been a pleasure and an honor working with each of the contributing artists.


Phil Toledano’s “Days
with My Father
” documents the relationship 
with his aging father over a
three-year period.
Gordon Stettinius’s images of his son Walker growing up capture the chaos and humor
of parenthood, from the perspective of a single father.

Angela Bacon-Kidwell’s
“Daily Sums” narrates one summer‘s worth
 of daily adventures with her son Bleu.

Alison Wells‘ 
“Time Flies” features small
and intimate portraits of her son and twin daughters, rendered in wet-plate
collodion. 
Warren Harold’s “Alternating Weekends” chronicle the post-divorce relationship with his young
son.

Laura Bulrton’s “Chalk
Dreams
” explore the fleeting moments and dreams of childhood – sometimes
filtered through a Grimm’s-like lens – in a collaborative process with her
daughters.

Aline Smithson’s “Arrangement in Green and Black:
Portraits of the Photographer’s Mother “ re-imagine Whistler’s Mother in a
series of unlikely costume changes, created in collaboration with her mother.

I’ll Be Your Mirror

HomeSpace Presents:Ill Be Your Mirror (New Orleans, LA) HomeSpace Gallery is proud to present an exploration of family through the eyes of seven contemporary photographers. Ill Be Your Mirror features work by Angela Bacon-Kidwell, Laura Burlton, Warren Harold, Aline Smithson, Gordon Stettinius, Phil Toledano and Alison Wells. Web Design Tewkesbury . Blog Commenting . carrera de fotografia . Curated by Jennifer Shaw, the images include a variety of stylistic approaches, ranging from candid glimpses to staged allegories. All document a creative collaboration between family members and all are bound by a profound intimacy. As fathers, daughters, mothers, sons, these seven brave photographers reveal the beauty, chaos, heartbreak and humor inherent in family relations. The exhibition will be on display October 13 – November 18, 2012. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, October 13th, 6-9pm. Several of the contributing artists will be in attendance. HomeSpace is located at 1128 St. Roch Street in New Orleans St. Claude Arts District and is open Saturdays 12-5pm, Sundays 12-3pm, and by appointment.HomeSpace is proud to present an exhibition exploring family through the eyes of seven contemporary photographers. Featuring: Warren Harold – Alternating Weekends Laura Burlton – Chalk Dreams Alison Wells – small & intimate wet plate collodion portraits of her children sample attached belowAline Smithson – Arrangement in Green and Black: Portraits of the Photographer’s Mother Phil Toledano Days With My Father Gordon Stettinius sepia toned images of Walker growing up Angela Bacon-Kidwell – Daily Sums (new series) OR selection from Traveling Dreams (TBD by Monday)

Looking at the Land From the Comfort of Home

Andy Adams works almost exclusively in the virtual world of contemporary photography. Whether you visit his photography website FlakPhoto.com, follow him on Twitter or take part in his daily Facebook discussions, you’ll find Adams diligently working as a young cultural anthropologist. Reaching far into the online photo ether, Adams always tries to present us with something new that he hopes you’ll be equally thrilled by.

Since 2006 FlakPhoto has grown to become a defining resource for anyone interested in the latest trends in photography online. Institutions like the RISD Museum of Art have recently taken notice of his work, calling upon Adams to curate an installation and accompanying online exhibition to complement its most recent massive show America in View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now.

In the fall of 2010, Adams curated a similar project for FotoWeek in Washington, D.C. called 100 Portraits, which was a broad survey of contemporary portraiture. Beyond the physical installation Adams, of course, put the project in its entirety on the Internet. LightBox recently spoke to Adams about his projects:

[100 Portraits] was the beginning of my realization that you could bring the ideas of online publishing and art exhibition together to produce a public digital exhibition for everyone in the world that has access to the Internet.

The focus of the RISD exhibition curated by Jan Howard is an historical survey of American Landscape photography from 1865 till now. The parameters for ‘Looking at the Land’ were also very broad and the website component is an exploration of current photography in the documentary style with interviews that analyze and understand the evolving landscape photo tradition. 

The constraints were fairly simple — I wanted this to reflect contemporary styles and current practice, and photographers exploring new directions. In the interest of serendipitous discovery, and hoping I would see something new, I put out a public call online seeking images ‘depicting the American Landscape since 2000.’

While curating the 100 Portraits project, which I coproduced with Larissa Leclair of the Indie Photobook Library, she impressed upon me the idea that this web site that I’ve been publishing every day was becoming a kind of archive and collection unto itself. In a way, the Web has become this giant collection of contemporary photography—portfolio websites, photo blogs, Tumblrs. That’s really interesting. 

What I’ve witnessed in the last few years is this real anxiety about the abundance of images in the world, on the Internet. That’s one way to see things. I prefer to view the situation as one with infinitely more opportunities to discover new, interesting work. Of course, the hazard of what I did here is that you have to look through more than 5,000 pictures to make sense of it all.

I’m interested in learning why people photograph landscape so I asked each of the 88 photographers the same questions: ‘What compels you to photograph the land? What does that mean?’ 

One of the things that I’m trying to do is to foreground the perspective of the image-maker. This may be another way to add meaning to that huge abundance of pictures. 

I also asked each photographer: ‘Why did you photograph this place?’

With landscape photography it’s easy to tell a pro-environmentalism narrative that shows the destruction of the land or how human alterations have forever destroyed that land. That’s all true, of course. But I don’t have an agenda with this project; I’m more interested in understanding why contemporary image-makers make landscape photographs to learn how that tradition is evolving in the 21st century.

If there is a dominant theme in the show it probably is the absurd juxtaposition of nature and culture, recognition that this is the way things are now, that we co-exist with nature. Rather than preach at the spectator, many of these images describe that disconnect with irony and humor.  

One of the things that I think might be indicative of this generation is that you have all these photographers that grew up in suburban sprawl, so that whole concept of home and place is different. Maybe we’re not even lamenting development and the loss of wilderness anymore because we’ve come of age without it? I see a lot of these photographers coming to terms with those ideas and the place where nature and culture are colliding. That’s why some of these pictures seem humorous or ironic. They are less an indictment and more of an acknowledgment.

It was important for me to show the American landscape and real places. America looks very different than it did 100 years ago. It’s also important to remember that these images are not objective facts — they’re subjective interpretations, personal perspectives about how the world looks today. 

This is very much a research project that I’m making public. The ideas that I’m trying to understand and the things that we are interested in have existed before this exhibition and they will exist after. I’ve attempted to tap into the new public sphere that exists in the global online photo community, to learn collectively what these things mean and to hopefully contribute to the history of things, so one day people can look back and learn from it. That’s the bigger picture goal.”

Andy Adams is the founder of FlakPhoto.com and curator of Looking at the Land — 21st Century American Views, a collaboration with the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design. The exhibition is on view until Jan. 13 and you can visit the online version here.

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Talk American

Video%20Playlist%20image.jpg
Stephanie Barber, Still from Dogs, 2000, Image courtesy of the artist


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | 6:00pm | MoCPVideo Playlist is a recurring series of one-night public video screenings guest curated in response to MoCP exhibitions. squido lense . Fotografia . Jesse Malmed will present a program in conjunction with Peripheral Views that includes a live, participatory performance during the screening.Talk barely, talk breathily, talk American. Fotografia . The works in this screening address the complexity of language and the myriad ways it shapes our experience of reality. Any place as big as America, with as many voices as America, has a multitude of expressions that exist at the periphery. This program brings the following to a center: a Sci-Fi CAPTCHA tale, what Microsoft Word found wrong with the Unabomber, how jargon becomes gibberish, a report from the out-of-bodied, a political speech about political speech, and finally, real talk from a pair of paper-mache dogs. Following the screening, Malmed will present selections from The Body Electronic, an ongoing and evolving series of participatory video-based performances. Malmed offers a visual, polyvocal, and interactive experience that engages audience members in dizzying, surprising, and humorous ways.The screening features the work of Joe Sandler, Peter Rose, Peggy Ahwesh, Doug Hall, Gabrielle De Vietri, Stephanie Barber, and Jesse Malmed.This event is free and open to the public.


Filter%20Banner%20BlogMoCP | 600 S. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Talk American

Video%20Playlist%20image.jpg
Stephanie Barber, Still from Dogs, 2000, Image courtesy of the artist


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | 6:00pm | MoCPVideo Playlist is a recurring series of one-night public video screenings guest curated in response to MoCP exhibitions. Jesse Malmed will present a program in conjunction with Peripheral Views that includes a live, participatory performance during the screening.Talk barely, talk breathily, talk American. The works in this screening address the complexity of language and the myriad ways it shapes our experience of reality. Any place as big as America, with as many voices as America, has a multitude of expressions that exist at the periphery. directory submission . This program brings the following to a center: a Sci-Fi CAPTCHA tale, what Microsoft Word found wrong with the Unabomber, how jargon becomes gibberish, a report from the out-of-bodied, a political speech about political speech, and finally, real talk from a pair of paper-mache dogs. link pyramid . Following the screening, Malmed will present selections from The Body Electronic, an ongoing and evolving series of participatory video-based performances. Malmed offers a visual, polyvocal, and interactive experience that engages audience members in dizzying, surprising, and humorous ways.The screening features the work of Joe Sandler, Peter Rose, Peggy Ahwesh, Doug Hall, Gabrielle De Vietri, Stephanie Barber, and Jesse Malmed.This event is free and open to the public.


Filter%20Banner%20BlogMoCP | 600 S. carrera de fotografia . Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]