Tag Archives: Cultures

Martin Seeds

Martin Seeds is a visual poet. He comes from Belfast, Northern Ireland, but is burrently living in Brighton, England where he completed his BA(hons) Photography at the University of Brighton. In his final year, Martin received the Tom Buckeridge Photography Prize. He is co-founder and contributor to the publishing venture ‘where will you spend eternity‘.

He is a wonderful writer, someone who explores his inner reaches and uses imagery to tell his tales. He looks for connections, for history, for a path to a place only he understands, but he brings a beauty to that journey. It’s a less linear way of making photographs, that leave room for interpretation and gestures of connection. I am featuring his project, I have troubles(…) below.

I have troubles[…]

I never set out to document anything. It was more of a search, an investigation. I wanted to understand more of myself. To find others like me. I needed to be sure that I wasn’t the only one.

But there must be others. I’m sure we, the ones from over there, all get asked the same questions. And therefore some of those others, like me, must also doubt their answer. There are those, the numbers of which are unknown to me, although I suspect there are many, that do not answer or give a faux “…it doesn’t matter…”. So much is buried in such a dismiss. For many don’t want to begin on that tiresome road of “…going into that nonsense…”.

I am convinced however that there exists within us all a deep sense of origin. It is stronger in some cultures, less deeply buried perhaps. To be clear I’m not talking about nationalism, no, that is something else. That’s wrapped up in political ideals and tied to legal boundary posts. What I’m referring to is more a primeval notion of origin. An unconscious reference point which influences, without politics, much of our choices. For we as humans have need of a reference point – a beginning? We require that ‘A’ to start from and ‘B’ to arrive at. You see I think we like straight lines, they are easy to negotiate and are convincing in their simplicity. History has, for example, a habit of being drawn as a straight line for that very reason.



Well, I read the history; several versions of it. And yes, each drew its own straight line. And I got sick of the sight of it to be honest. It wasn’t telling me anything I wanted to know. It told me someone else’s story. So I went back there. I went back to find my own ‘A’.

This work is the result of my experience.

Photographer #286: Stephen Dupont

Stephen Dupont, 1967, Australia, is a photojournalist and portrait photographer who focuses on fragile cultures and marginalized people. He has released several monographs amongst which are also three handmade limited edition books. His exhibition Afghanistan: The Perils of Freedom 1993-2009 is a fifteen year retrospective on all of his journeys to Afghanistan. It shows the various stages the country has gone through, the resilience of the Afghan people and the growth of the photographer himself. Stephen puts a lot of respect into his photography, showing the human dignity of his subjects. Raskols is a series of portraits shot in 2004 which shows a gang member community, better known as the Raskols of Papua New Guinea. Dupont does not limit himself, he uses polaroid, medium format and 35mm camera’s. The following images come from the series Afghanistan: The Perils of Freedom 1993-2009, Axe Me Biggie, or MR Take my Picture and Raskols.

 


Website: www.stephendupont.com

 

Photographer #286: Stephen Dupont

Stephen Dupont, 1967, Australia, is a photojournalist and portrait photographer who focuses on fragile cultures and marginalized people. He has released several monographs amongst which are also three handmade limited edition books. His exhibition Afghanistan: The Perils of Freedom 1993-2009 is a fifteen year retrospective on all of his journeys to Afghanistan. It shows the various stages the country has gone through, the resilience of the Afghan people and the growth of the photographer himself. Stephen puts a lot of respect into his photography, showing the human dignity of his subjects. Raskols is a series of portraits shot in 2004 which shows a gang member community, better known as the Raskols of Papua New Guinea. Dupont does not limit himself, he uses polaroid, medium format and 35mm camera’s. The following images come from the series Afghanistan: The Perils of Freedom 1993-2009, Axe Me Biggie, or MR Take my Picture and Raskols.

 


Website: www.stephendupont.com

 

Pictory Magazine

Taking on the idea of sharing photography around the world with editing based on themes, a similar vision that was pioneered by JPG magazine, Laura Brunow Miner, a former editor at JPG magazine launched the online photo-magazine named Pictory.

Pictory appears to be most geared towards edited stories, telling about the live and places around the world and composed by combining one image from each contributor. It is most about a cultural exchange, rather than a selection of the best photographs and so if you are looking for great images you will feel that it is a mixed bag, but if you are looking to learn about people, societies, and the world in an intimate manner by the people who live the lives they share with images, then you are for a treat.

Pictory is a showcase for your best photo stories.

Pictory is a showcase for people around the world to document their lives and cultures. Anyone can submit one large, captioned image to each of Pictory’s editorial themes. I’m editor, designer, and founder Laura Brunow Miner, and I will select a few dozen of the best items from each theme to appear in each showcase (source)