Tag Archives: Crowds

Last Days on the Road with Obama by Brooks Kraft

After months of nearly non-stop campaigning, President Obama and his team have spent the last two weeks crisscrossing the country to make their final appeals to voters. Veteran political photographer Brooks Kraft has been there to document the campaign’s final days.

This was the eighth presidential campaign that Kraft has photographed, and his sixth for TIME. Over the years, he has honed his approach to shooting some of the most photographed men and women in the United States. seo marketing . Kraft rarely takes his pictures from the press platforms, preferring to move around, searching out unique angles and small details.

“I attempt to work around all the messaging and clutter surrounding the candidate, to take photographs that reflect the character of the campaign,” he told TIME.

These photographs, many shot in so-called ‘battleground’ states, capture the energy and exhaustion of a campaign winding down.Kraft captures both the quiet detailsfrom Secret Service agents on a distant roof to a close-up of a pink breast cancer awareness bracelet on the President’s wrist and the dramatic moments ecstatic crowds pressing toward the stage and the President silhouetted against spotlights as he speaks.

Shooting politics for so many years has allowed Kraft to make iconic pictures that transcend the obvious. “Shooting campaigns requires patience and persistence,” he said. “It can take many days of long travel to find images that can last beyond the daily news cycle.”

Brooks Kraft is a Washington D.C.-based photographer.

Behind the Cover: Obama Makes His Way to the DNC

Photographer Callie Shell has documented Barack Obama for more than eight years. This week, her pictures of the President campaigning in New Hampshire are featured in TIME’s special Democratic Convention Issue. The photojournalist began documenting Obama first as a junior Senator, then throughout his campaign and has continued through his first term in office.

Callie Shell for TIME

The cover of TIME’s Sept. 10 Special Convention Issue.

Shell’s most recent photographs show a confident President, relaxed and composed, before making speeches at campaign stops throughout New Hampshire. “You spend a lot of time as President waiting for people to introduce you,” she tells TIME, “so that’s always the best time to be around him.”

Although Shell’s eight years of experience with the President help her know what to expect, she still feels nervous about her responsibility documenting the leader of the free world. Looking for different angles that show the Obama she witnesses firsthand is a constant challengelike her photograph of Obama taking a quiet moment alone before hopping onstage in Rochester on August 18 (slide #5).

And sometimes during these fleeting moments of calm, Obama and Shell chat about their childrenboth are parents of children the same age.

Shell says she’s always looking for ways to show things from both the perspective of Obama and the crowds that come out to meet him. “It helps when there’s a really cute kid with really big eyes peeking over [a barricade],” she says of one of her photos shot last week (slide #13).

“I think its so hard to remember who that person is on the podiumthat these politicians are real people,” she says.

Even though Shell has photographed many different politicians through the years, she understands that making photographs of the President and other decision-makers is reliant on their trust. “You aren’t here as a Republican or Democrat or an Independentyou’re just here to show people what goes on when they’re not standing at the podium.”

Callie Shell is a South Carolina-based photographer who has photographed Barack Obama since 2004. linkwheel . See more of her work for TIME here.

Celebrating the Brotherhood’s Victory: A New President is Elected in Egypt

It’s been a restless month for politics in Egypt, where longtime president Hosni Mubarak was ousted from office during the Arab Spring last February. On June 14, just days before the country’s first democratic presidential elections, the Supreme Constitutional Court dissolved Egypt’s Islamist-majority parliament. The elections themselves were further marred by confusion when election officials delayed the announcement of a winner, saying they needed more time to investigate charges of electoral abuse.

Since the vote last weekend, supporters of Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsy have been gathering daily in Tahrir Square. On Sunday, an official announcement declared Morsy the winner and the tension that had been brewing in the crowds all week quickly transformed into euphoria.

Photographer Daniel Berehulak documented the activity in Cairo in both the lead-up to the announcement and the ensuing celebrations. He described the frustration he observed while the public anxiously awaited an outcome, saying, “There was anger in the street, people were arguing on corners.”

As the results were announced on Sunday crowds packed into Tahrir, spilling out onto surrounding bridges. “People were jammed,” said Berehulak. “They were lining up to get into Tahrir to get a piece of it, to get a taste of freedom and a resolution to the revolution.”

Elated Morsy supporters set off fireworks and flares and the roar of trumpets and chants filled the air. Overwhelmed by both emotion and sweltering heat, several members of the crowd fainted and had to be carried to nearby ambulances.

Taking photographs was a challenge for Berehulak who struggled to find enough space to hold his camera up in the dense and excited crowd. “They were just embracing us,” he says. “It was so overwhelming, but it was so beautiful.”

Daniel Berehulak is a photographer based in New Delhi. See more of his work here.

Read more about Mohamed Morsy’s election on TIME.com.

Thibault Brunet: First Person Shooter

(c) Thibault Brunet

Exhibition on view:
April 19 – May 19, 2012

4RT Contemporary
Chaussée de Waterloo, 1038
1180 Brussels

French photographer Thibault Brunet takes a photojournalist’s approach to his seemingly studio-lit portraits of soldiers, following troops through their daily missions passing through war zones and rubble waiting for those moments when “something seems to go wrong and a state of disorder sets in.” These photographs from the series First Person Shooter, along with some work from his latest series Paris: In the Aftermath of War, will be on view as part of his solo show at 4RT Contemporary in Brussels (through May 19, 2012).

“An undefined gaze or the glassy eye of a soldier; the disorientation at a Paris Métro station,” the gallery writes in their press release, “clearly familiar to us but now emptied of its usual crowds and devastated by an unknown conflict: these visuals challenge the spectator and require another look, a second reading.”

His work was profiled by Time‘s LightBox last year, which also explored his use of video game screenshots in the series, accompanied by a gallery of images from the show now in Brussels.

Brunet was also selected as runner up for Aperture’s 2011 Portfolio Prize for his work in First Person Shooter. More information on the 2012 Portfolio Prize call for entries will be available soon, but only Aperture magazine subscribers are qualified for entry, so have a look at some of work of the past recipients and runners up, and sign up today.

My Money’s on The Artist

If you have been reading Lenscratch over the years, you know that I am a devoted Oscar fan. I see as many movies as I can over the year, and those numbers increase significantly towards Oscar week. I have had the amazing opportunity to attend the Oscars twice, and last year’s experience was really special–nothing like walking side by side Colin Firth into the event (thought he wasn’t aware of it!). This year I will be hosting a little Oscar party and will be glued to the television for the entire day. My money’s on The Artist, but my heart is with Beginners.

A few shots before the red carpet…
The crowds were screaming for us to open our windows…so as I rolled mine down, a huge roar came up from the crowd so I very quickly rolled up the window so they wouldn’t be disappointed I wasn’t someone of interest.

Enjoy the show!

My Money’s on The Artist

If you have been reading Lenscratch over the years, you know that I am a devoted Oscar fan. I see as many movies as I can over the year, and those numbers increase significantly towards Oscar week. I have had the amazing opportunity to attend the Oscars twice, and last year’s experience was really special–nothing like walking side by side Colin Firth into the event (thought he wasn’t aware of it!). This year I will be hosting a little Oscar party and will be glued to the television for the entire day. My money’s on The Artist, but my heart is with Beginners.

A few shots before the red carpet…
The crowds were screaming for us to open our windows…so as I rolled mine down, a huge roar came up from the crowd so I very quickly rolled up the window so they wouldn’t be disappointed I wasn’t someone of interest.

Enjoy the show!

Posters on sticks. A vast river of banner-bearing humanity with something to say

Here is a postscript to Eye’s poster debate, writes Sally Jeffery (see ‘Help! Poster initiatives mean well …

This time: posters on sticks.

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The vast river of humanity that flowed through central London on 26 March was resplendent with a waving forest of placards and banners, swept along by up to half a million people. They had come from all over Britain to register anger or fear or despair at the coalition government’s scheduled spending cuts – and they did it with posters.

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At the heart of the march were the massed cohorts of the public service trade unions, but it felt as if nearly everyone else was there, too, all mixed up together. The actions of anti-capitalists a few streets away became the day’s other story. However, the occasional masked trooper who pushed through the crowds of marchers seemed to be carrying a faint – and unexpected – whiff of elitism instead of a banner.

Some of the marchers’ placards and banners were pro jobs (usefully put up online beforehand as free-to-use pdfs), some home-made, some were old and iconic union banners. No designer’s name in sight though – just a sort of democracy of poster production, proclaiming a common cause. Perhaps posters don’t change events. But then again, it’s possible Britain would have a different government now, if people hadn’t marched with banners in 2003, and been ignored.

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