Tag Archives: Crowd

Romka magazine: a collective photo-album

Romka magazine, Issue #7

I wrote about Romka magazine over on the eyecurious Tumblr some time ago, but I will confess to never having picked up a paper copy before, so the latest issue (#7) is the first I have been able to flick through. The conceit is a simple one, “favorite pictures and the stories that lie behind them” by pros and amateurs alike. No book reviews, no interviews, no ads… no excess fat. The result is a kind of crowd-sourced collective photo-album, which makes it sound terrible when it is really quite good. Romka simply does what it says on the tin: it presents a series of single images by photographers (that might be Roger Ballen or it might be Sachi “the builder who lives in a pink house in New Orleans”), each accompanied by a short text explaining what that image means to them. It is a very simple recipe, and like many simple recipes it is hard to get right, but when it works it is rather delicious. Although it follows a fairly strict formula it doesn’t feel formulaic because of its democratic, all-inclusive approach to images and because it helps to reveal some of the myriad reasons why photographs matter so much to people. This simple formula also makes it refreshingly different to most other photography magazines out there.

I have done a lot of wondering (to myself and sometimes out loud) about whether the photo album has become irrelevant today given the changes in the way that we make and look at photographs… Romka makes me think that there is life in it yet.

Romka magazine, Issue #7

Romka magazine, Issue #7

Romka magazine, Issue #7, November 2012, edition of 1,500.

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Annual Talkin’ Back: Chicago Youth Respond Draws a Crowd

4.5.12_Talkin%27Back.jpg

Last Thursday, the MoCP opened its annual student exhibition Talkin’ Back: Chicago Youth Respond, showcasing work by Chicago Public School students. And what these students had to say did not fall on deaf ears: the MoCP was packed with students, their families, community activists and art lovers.

The weeklong exhibition, which closed yesterday, exhibited young artists from six of Chicago’s public schools. To see photos from the exhibition, please take a look at the Picasa page for the Center for Community Arts Partnerships (CCAP).

Talkin’ Back: Chicago Youth Respond features works by students at Crown Community Academy; Curie Metropolitan High School; Juarez Community Academy; Nicolas Senn High School; Theodore Herzl Elementary School; and Manuel Perez Jr. Elementary School. The Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP), Project AIM and CCAP sponsor the annual program.

Annual Talkin’ Back: Chicago Youth Respond Draws a Crowd

4.5.12_Talkin%27Back.jpg

Last Thursday, the MoCP opened its annual student exhibition Talkin’ Back: Chicago Youth Respond, showcasing work by Chicago Public School students. And what these students had to say did not fall on deaf ears: the MoCP was packed with students, their families, community activists and art lovers.

The weeklong exhibition, which closed yesterday, exhibited young artists from six of Chicago’s public schools. To see photos from the exhibition, please take a look at the Picasa page for the Center for Community Arts Partnerships (CCAP).

Talkin’ Back: Chicago Youth Respond features works by students at Crown Community Academy; Curie Metropolitan High School; Juarez Community Academy; Nicolas Senn High School; Theodore Herzl Elementary School; and Manuel Perez Jr. Elementary School. The Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP), Project AIM and CCAP sponsor the annual program.

Mark Sherratt

Mark Sherratt’s terrific new project, Train, is intriguing on several levels. As foreigners, how do we enter into a culture that is not our own and describe it in a way that is authentic and unique? Mark has captured a way to create portraits of Indian commuters that perfectly frame the essence of daily life. Moments of exhaustion, of curiosity or boredom, and ultimately, connection, allow us to find our commonalities.

Mark started working as a photographer at a family portrait studio in a small town in England, where he fell in love with photography, and out of love with the family portrait business. He is now an advertising and editorial photographer based in London.

TRAIN: Whilst traveling around India by train I became captivated by the diverse and interesting people that I met along the way and I started the project as a way to document them.

I think what is so fascinating for me about the trains is that they are such a microcosm of Indian society. They are full of the rich, the poor, old, young etc etc. I think they are also a great example of how the society there functions, they are often crowded and hectic, but everything seems to work really well; there is always room for one more and people are always willing to help you out.

By taking these photos I wanted to try and capture this moment to allow the viewer to break though this chaotic situation and to focus on a single person or a few people who, in a place like India, just become a part of the crowd.

My Money’s on The Artist

If you have been reading Lenscratch over the years, you know that I am a devoted Oscar fan. I see as many movies as I can over the year, and those numbers increase significantly towards Oscar week. I have had the amazing opportunity to attend the Oscars twice, and last year’s experience was really special–nothing like walking side by side Colin Firth into the event (thought he wasn’t aware of it!). This year I will be hosting a little Oscar party and will be glued to the television for the entire day. My money’s on The Artist, but my heart is with Beginners.

A few shots before the red carpet…
The crowds were screaming for us to open our windows…so as I rolled mine down, a huge roar came up from the crowd so I very quickly rolled up the window so they wouldn’t be disappointed I wasn’t someone of interest.

Enjoy the show!

My Money’s on The Artist

If you have been reading Lenscratch over the years, you know that I am a devoted Oscar fan. I see as many movies as I can over the year, and those numbers increase significantly towards Oscar week. I have had the amazing opportunity to attend the Oscars twice, and last year’s experience was really special–nothing like walking side by side Colin Firth into the event (thought he wasn’t aware of it!). This year I will be hosting a little Oscar party and will be glued to the television for the entire day. My money’s on The Artist, but my heart is with Beginners.

A few shots before the red carpet…
The crowds were screaming for us to open our windows…so as I rolled mine down, a huge roar came up from the crowd so I very quickly rolled up the window so they wouldn’t be disappointed I wasn’t someone of interest.

Enjoy the show!

On the Campaign Trail with Newt Gingrich

I arrived in Charlotte, N.C. early on the day of the South Carolina primary and headed straight to Tommy’s Ham House in Greenville. Newt Gingrich was giving an electrifying speech inside as a crowd milled around outside. The previous week I’d covered my first presidential primary in New Hampshire, where many events were disrupted by attention seekers and protesters. Occupy Wall Street supporters came to a Mitt Romney rally and were quickly thrown out by police. At a Ron Paul event, a man with a boot on his head named Vermin Supreme made chicken noises and claimed that if he were elected president, every American would get a pony.

South Carolina was more restrained. There were no active protesters. A lone Ron Paul supporter kept a silent vigil a respectful distance away. Tommy’s Ham House continued to serve breakfast. I didn’t try their famous ham, but their hot cakes were excellent. Gingrich left in a bus with a giant portrait of his face emblazoned on the side. It started pouring and the crowd hid under signs that read, ‘Newt 2012. Rebuilding the America We Love.’

Next, Gingrich stopped at a nearby middle school serving as a voting station. He patiently shook every hand of the assembled crowd, numbering close to a hundred. There were only a few journalists, compared to New Hampshire, where the media often ringed the candidates three or four deep.

One of the last stops of the day was a Gingrich campaign gathering at a Chick-fil-A in Anderson. Like most Gingrich events, it was packed to the brim, with supporters pressing their faces against the restaurant’s windows to get a peek. Sometimes the event locations seemed arbitrary. Why a Chick-fil-A, which was founded in Georgia, instead of a locally-owned business? Another journalist speculated it was because of the widely-promoted Christian values of its founder, Truett Cathy. All the candidates were trying to woo the evangelical base, and nearly everyone at the event was caucasian.

Gingrich would beat Romney to win the South Carolina primary that evening. The victory party that night was restrained, though 1970s and 1980s rock-and-roll classics blared in the packed ballroom. There were a few brief speeches before Gingrich arrived to thank his supporters and attack Barack Obama. Most of the attendees left immediately after the speech was over. I asked where everyone was going and was told the private parties would continue deep into the night.

Peter van Agtmael is a photographer represented by Magnum. His work from Iraq won a World Press Photo award in 2007. More of his work can be seen here.

31 Photographers: Opening Party, Paris, 28 September

EXPOinvite_Paris 2011-550.jpgPlease join us for a glass of wine, and see the award-winning work of 31 great contemporary photographers (all winners from Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2010). The show is on display now at Spos Gallery, 7 rue Jules Valls, 75011 Paris (nearest Metro: Charonne). The party is on Wednesday 28 September, from 5 pm to 9 pm. new homes . Don’t miss it!

More info on our Facebook page. And please tell all of your friends. longboard deck . It’s going to be a very international art crowd, and lots of fun and inspiration.