Tag Archives: Contributor

Tearsheet of The Day | Brent Stirton’s Blood Ivory in the National Geographic magazine

The latest National Geographic magazine issue, October 2012, has a cover story called Blood Ivory, written by Bryan Christy, an investigation linking religious art and ivory smuggling. The photographs are by the always brilliant Brent Stirton. The photo seen in the below spread is one of the most harrowing images of the series. You can view the entire edit online on the magazine’s website here.

pp. 34-35. National Geographic magazine, October 2012.
Photo © Brent Stirton
Caption on the spread: Bodies are what remain in Cameroon’s Biuba Ndjidah National Park after one of the largest mass elephant slaughters in decades. Armed with grenades and AK-47s, poachers killed more than 300.

Brent Stirton is a South African photographer based in New York and a regular contributor to National Geographic magazine. He is represented by Reportage by Getty Images. Stirton won a First Prize in the Nature Stories category in the 2012 World Press Photo for his Rhino Wars  series, which was also photographed for the National Geographic magazine.

Aperture Anthology Bluelines Arrive!

Aperture Anthology In-A-Bag


The bluelines for our upcoming Aperture Magazine Anthology: The Minor White Years, 19521976 have just been delivered to editorial, expertly packaged and fully portable!

This long-awaited volumepublished on the occasion of Aperture Magazine’s sixtieth anniversarywill provide a selection of the best critical writing from the first twenty-five years of the magazinethe period spanning the tenure of cofounder and editor Minor White.

The texts and visuals in this anthology were selected by Peter C. Bunnell, Whites protg and an early member of the Aperture staff, who went on to become a major force in photography as an influential writer, curator, and professor. linkwheel creation . Several documents from Apertures founders and individual articles are reproduced in facsimile, and the book is enlivened by other distinctive elements, including a portfolio of each cover, and a selection of epigrams and editorials that appeared at the front of each issue. An extensive index of every contributor to the first twenty-five years of the magazine makes this an indispensible resource. Stay tuned for its Fall 2012 release…

Behind the Cover: How Guns Won

Guns dont actually kill people is sometimes a refrain from gun rights advocates when they run low on arguments in a policy discussion. On an incredibly basic level this is true. A gun itself is no more responsible for a death than a knife or an axe or any other instrument meant to harm and kill; the blame for a death falls on the person wielding them. But in the category of modern weaponsespecially gunsthe make, model and accessories matter a great deal.

When James Holmes allegedly stormed into a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. to maim and murder as many people as possible, he reportedly wielded an AR-15-type assault rifle. Holmes added an accessory: a 100-round drum that looks like two small film reels attached to the bottom of the weapon. This addition allowed him to fire round after round without reloading, which is what he allegedly did until the weapon jammed.

To produce this week’s cover, TIME commissioned Bartholomew Cooke, a talented young photographer who specializes in capturing the power of inanimate objects. seo marketing . When TIME asked Cooke to photograph the types of weaponsan assault rifle, two pistols and a shotgunthat were allegedly used in the massacre at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., there were several difficult considerations. Cooke had photographed weapons before, but not in the connotation of a horrific tragedy. It was important that I didnt want to glamorize them, but I still did want to create a compelling graphic image, Cooke says. Figuring out how to photograph the gun was difficult. I certainly wouldn’t want images I create to cause anyone pain in any way.

Bartholomew Cooke is a photographer based in Los Angeles and a regular contributor to TIME. See more of his work here.

Call Out – London-based collective Jur•nl seeks online responses and collaborators for experimental research zine

Wonder Valley, California, April 2012. Photo Miranda Gavin

JUR•NL CALLS FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
It’s a beautiful hot day in the UK so only a short post about a call I received from a collective asking for a contribution. I was more than happy to contribute a photo I took recently in Wonder Valley California as a stimulus. Since I sent it in, I’ve checked the website and some of the responses, both images and text, are intriguing and have got me thinking about the image again. This is the cyclical nature of work, you make it, look at it, re-look at it, have someone else look at it, and perhaps, in some small way, one’s initial response shifts.

I want to suggest to the collective that original contributor also responds to the image again so that this response can feed into the process. When I saw the photo and the images researched and quotes, I thought of a David Lynch quote from Catching the Big Fish that I would like to contribute. First, I need to find the book.

“jur•nl is a collective of five young London-based artists and photographers working together on an experimental collaborative project with professionals, whilst also engaging others in the communication between images themselves as well as creative research.

“The jur•nl concept takes a stimulus from an artist/photographer/professional and during the week, as a collective and network, they gather research in the form of images/text/video etc on their site. At the end of the week they come together as a group and create a single image in response to the stimulus. Now, the collective has widened tthe call and anyone can contribute creative research on the site, in response to the stimuli.

“From the content gathered on the site, jur•nl will create zines which will feature the public contributors work/research alongside professionals.

The creative research jur•nl is looking for can be photographs, drawings, text, video… absolutely anything in a creative or research format which relates to the stimulus of the week. So far established artists and photographers contributing have included Zed Nelson, Elina Brotherus and Emma Critchley with many more to come.

“Get in touch with your submissions and be sure to write your name when submitting so the work can be tagged with your name. Please feel free to ask questions via email, or other social networking sites.” (from the press release)

Twitter @jurnlcollective
Facebook: Jur•nl collective
[email protected]

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: art. research, collaboration, collective, David Lynch, Jur•nl, London College of Communication, Photography, Wonder Valley

Tearsheet of the Day | 22 May 2012

Marco Grob has the Time cover and a double spread inside with photos of Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The cover itself is rather uninspiring black and white head shot (you can see it here), but I really liked Grob’s double spread photo opening the Richard Stengel piece, ‘Bibi’s Choice’, showing Netanyahu on the backseat of a black limo only lit by some of Grob’s strobes, in a scene that – to  me  – portrays him, even with that expressionless face,  as a somewhat shady character or some kind of a dark force (of Middle East politics).  I might of course be reading some of my own not-so-positive views on the prime minister into the photograph. I wonder what Michael Shaw would think? Anyway,  you’ll have to make up your own mind. But I’m sure you’ll agree… It’s a terrific image.

Photo by Marco Grob for TIME

Marco Grob (b.1965, Switzerland) is a well-known portrait photographer. He is a regular contributor to Time as one of the magazine’s seven contract photographers. One of Grob’s recent notable series for the magazine was the Beyond 9/11: Portraits for Resilience project.

Stephen Chalmers, Baby with tractor at Sunset (vandalized Cerney/Sun Kim sculpture)

Stephen Chalmers, Baby with tractor at Sunset (vandalized Cerney/Sun Kim sculpture)

Stephen Chalmers

Baby with tractor at Sunset (vandalized Cerney/Sun Kim sculpture),
Phoenix, 2009
From the Transience series
Website – StephenChalmers.com

Stephen Chalmers has worked as a Lead Treatment Counselor to severely emotionally disturbed children, worked as an Emergency Medical Technician, and taught gang children photography – informing his projects which deal with issues of loss. He has also been a contributor to five books, and has been in group and solo exhibitions throughout the U.S. and also in Australia, Ireland, British Columbia, Thailand, England, South Africa, and China. Chalmers earned his MFA in Cinema and Photography from Southern Illinois University, served as the Northwest Regional Chair for the Society for Photographic Education for two terms, was professor in the state of Washington for eight years and is currently a professor of Photography at Youngstown State University in Ohio. His work is in several collections including the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Light Work, Polaroid, and the Getty Research Institute.

David Kimelman

I first shared David Kimelman’s fascinating project, Reality Wanted, on LENSCRATCH last year. The project looks at the broad spectrum of wannabe reality stars and explores the social phenomenon of life on camera. David, a graduate of Pratt Institute, is a Brooklyn based photographer with a number of recent exhibitions, including one at The International Center of Photography in New York City last year. He is also a regular contributor at East Village Boys, Dirty Magazine, and Latina Magazine.

Images from Reality Wanted

David has a new series, Natural Order, that explores humans and their relationship to the natural world.

The photographs in the series, Natural Order, are about the complex, tenuous, and often contradictory relationships people have with the natural world. They express our fear of elemental chaos, alienation from nature, and our attempts to protect ourselves and put ourselves above the natural order. However, these images also reveal our fascination with natural beauty and wildness, and our reverence for the immutable forces of our planet.

Photographer #392: Zhang Jingna

Zhang Jingna aka Zemotion, 1988, Singapore, is a very young and productive fashion photographer currently based in Los Angeles. She started photographing while studying fashion and posted her pictures on Deviantart which quickly lead to millions of views. Very soon she would be shooting for Mercedes Benz Taiwan at the age of 20 years old with Ogilvy & Mather. Since then she has worked for brands as Montblanc, Lancôme, Elle and Canon and became a regular contributor for Harper’s Bazaar Singapore. In 2008 she released her first book entitled Something Beautiful. Her work is stylish, classy and very mature for her young age. Besides photography she has been a very succesful at shooting air rifles, even broke the national record and joined the national team, winning several prizes. The following images come from various personal, fashion and commercial shoots.


Website: www.zhangjingna.com