Tag Archives: Conceptual Photographer

Photographer #426: Chen Wei

Chen Wei, 1980, is a Chinese fine-art and conceptual photographer based in Beijing. He builds large installations to photograph. His narrative images show bizarre spaces, scenes and objects that leave the viewer wondering. Chen uses his personal memories, childhood fantasies and combines this with realities found in modern China. He assembles all the required objects in his studio and starts building his scenes. “Chen Wei illustrates an intricate imagination fascinated with the eccentric and fanciful pursuits of early science, mathematics, alchemy, philosophers and madmen.” (M97 Gallery) His work has been shown in several solo exhibitions and in a vast number of group exhibitions throughout the world. The following images come from the series Everyday, Scenery and Props, House of Recovery and The Augur’s Game.

Website: www.chen-wei.orgwww.m97gallery.com

Photographer #425: Bohnchang Koo

Bohnchang Koo, 1953, South-Korea, is a fine-art and conceptual photographer based in Seoul. He first studied Business Administration at Yonsei University before studying photography in Hamburg. His work is often about impermanence, the passing of time, the disappearance and heritage. For his series Vessel he photographed rare porcelain ceramics of the Korean Joseon dynasty. He traveled to museums around the world to find and document the white objects against a white backdrop in soft light. As an “old family album” he tries to bring the objects together and retrieve the lost Korean heritage. Koo has been called “one of Korea’s most influential photographers.” Not only due to his photographic art, but also as an educator and exhibition planner he helped shape and promote Korean photography to a wider audience. He released a large number of monographs and his work has been exhibited extensively throughout the world and is found in public collections as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. The following images come from the series Interiors, Vessel and In the Beginning.

Website: www.bckoo.com

Photographer #407: Francisco Reina

Francisco Reina, 1979, Spain, is a politically and socially-engaged conceptual photographer based in The Netherlands. In his project The Art of Power he meticulously manipulated architectural elements that depict political institutions, making them into impenetrable structures. We see the  ruling institutions of today as rational enterprises who’s interest should be to further the interest of their societies as a whole. Francisco strongly believes that this notion is not always rooted in reality and that the leaders of our world are gradually becoming an elite class primarily concerned with defending its own interests. The series called Strauss’ Legacy focuses on “the so-called neoconservatives and the way in which their presence in the American presidential administration on September 11, 2001 shaped events.”  He created images that through a conceptual way takes a close look at “the role of multinational corporations in a conflict which began under the name “Operation Enduring Freedom” and turned into a perfect market niche for multi-million dollar earnings.” His work has been exhibited mainly in Spain, but also in The Netherlands and New York. The following images come from the series The Art of Power, Strauss’ Legacy and The Silent Enigma.

Website: www.franciscoreina.com

Photographer #405: Daniel Gordon

Daniel Gordon, 1980, USA, is a conceptual photographer who lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He received a BA at Bard College in 2003 and an MFA at Yale University in 2006. He works in a sculptural way. He searches on the internet for images that he can use. The images he finds are printed and cut in order to make large three dimensional collages. These collages are life-size, using his own body as a reference. Once the collages are finished he photographs them with a large format camera. After the photograph has been made he disassembles the sculptures in order to use several body parts for new works. In his series Thin Skin II he depicts the human body in extreme situations as giving birth, accidents and operations. Both of his parents were doctors and he feels that seeing the images of operations when he was young have influenced him in his work today. His photographs have been exhibited extensively in the US and several times in Switzerland and France. The following works come from the series Still Lifes, Portraits & Parts, Portrait Studio and Thin Skin II.

Website: www.danielgordonstudio.com

Photographer #390: Ken Kitano

Ken Kitano, 1968, Japan, is a conceptual photographer who uses long exposures and piles images on top of each other to create a new photograph. He has been working on the series Our Face since 1999. He shoots portraits of various social groups as young girls in Harajuku, office workers, farm village women in Bangladesh and supporters of the English national soccer team. Each time he shoots various dozens of evenly taken portraits which he piles on top of each other. The more faces that are printed, the more the contours of an individual become blurred and the expressions and ages become more ambigious in the final portrait. The project started in Asia, but should cover the American continent, Europe and Africa in the future. In 2005 he released the book Our Face. In his series One Day Kitano captures specifically chosen locations using an exposure time that stretches from sunrise to sunset. The following images come from the series Our Face, One Day and City Flow and Fusion.


Website: www.ourface.com

Photographer #370: Liu Bolin

Liu Bolin, 1973, China, is a sculptor and conceptual photographer. He received a B.A. from Shandong University of Arts in Jinan and an M.F.A. in sculpture at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. When in 2005 the Chinese government ordered the demolition of the Beijing International Art Camp which housed Liu’s studio he created an image as a response. He painted his body against the rubble of the demolished building. It was the first image of the extended body of work entitled Hiding in the City. His entire body is painted to create an effect that makes him fade away into the background. Due to this body of work he is also called “The Invisible Man”. Some of his work is a protest against the actions of the Chinese government and other pieces deal with other social issues as the process of urbanization in contemporary China. His photographs always possess a clear thought and statement. He also created images in Milan, Venice and New York. The images have been exhibited throughout the world. The following works come from the series Hiding in the City and Dragon Series.

Unfortunately Liu does not have a website. To see a large selection of his work please visit: www.ekfineart.com & www.boxartgallery.com

Photographer #370: Liu Bolin

Liu Bolin, 1973, China, is a sculptor and conceptual photographer. He received a B.A. from Shandong University of Arts in Jinan and an M.F.A. in sculpture at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. When in 2005 the Chinese government ordered the demolition of the Beijing International Art Camp which housed Liu’s studio he created an image as a response. He painted his body against the rubble of the demolished building. It was the first image of the extended body of work entitled Hiding in the City. His entire body is painted to create an effect that makes him fade away into the background. Due to this body of work he is also called “The Invisible Man”. Some of his work is a protest against the actions of the Chinese government and other pieces deal with other social issues as the process of urbanization in contemporary China. His photographs always possess a clear thought and statement. He also created images in Milan, Venice and New York. The images have been exhibited throughout the world. The following works come from the series Hiding in the City and Dragon Series.

Unfortunately Liu does not have a website. To see a large selection of his work please visit: www.ekfineart.com & www.boxartgallery.com

Photographer #340: Xavier Delory

Xavier Delory, 1973, Belgium, is a conceptual photographer with a focus on architecture. He studied Interior Architecture, Computer Graphics / 3D and Photography. He is currently working on his series Formes Urbaines. He studies the recurrent characteristics of modern cities, with Brussels as his first field of research. The series consists of three chapters, Bare d’ilôt, Dom-ino and Façade Libre. In his series Fermé le Dimanche he questions whether commercial centres are the new temples of our society. He combined religious architectural forms with supermarkets and other stores. In Habitat he focused on the recognizable style of Belgian houses which he uses to explore the concept of protection. By eliminating windows, doors and any other openings in usual houses he pushes this to its extremes. Xavier has exhibited his work on numerous occasions throughout Belgium and France. The following images come from the series Formes Urbaines (Dom-ino), Fermé le Dimanche and Habitat.

Website: www.xavierdelory.be