Tag Archives: Collective

Neil Goldberg and New York Moments

UPDATE: Goldberg’s exhibit Stories the City Tells Itself at the Museum of the City of New York has been extended through July 4, 2012.

Multimedia artist Neil Goldberg grew up on Long Island, and his childhood was full of trips into New York City, a place that he says always seemed glamorous for being just out of reach. There was a certain part in the drive, on the way through the borough of Queens, when the car would pass the massive apartment complexes known as LeFrak City. “I just thought about all those windows and how behind each of them lives were being lived,” says Goldberg. “You couldn’t see into them but it was thrilling to think of them as this big, dense collective of lives.”

Neil Goldberg

Installation at the Museum of the City of New York.

Goldberg’s continued affinity for the collection of lives that is New York City is on view in his solo exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York, which has recently been extended to run through June 19. The show contains a dozen different projects plucked from two decades of his work for their focus on the city.

But Goldberg says that the city is not so much subject as catalyst for his work. “I’m deeply fascinated and engrossed with New York but really all the projects in the show are really just about being alive in a body,” he says. “New York has all these amazingly specific qualities that I love, but in the end it’s a huge, idiosyncratic public space and it’s a place to watch people being alive. That’s the thing that I’m mostly interested in: the basic mystery of ‘here we are, alive in these bodies, at this point in time.’”

The mundane moments he captures, such as the boarding of a bus, are overlooked by the people involved. And there is often, the photographer finds, an instant of rich emotion beneath the banality of it all. “There’s nothing more mundane than missing the subway, but the way it’s experienced has a more operatic quality than what’s actually happening,” he says. “Which is that you’re going to have to wait another five minutes.” His choice of video versus still photography depends on whether that emotion is best emphasized inside or outside of time. The faces of people who miss the train, he says, are best examined freed from the rest of the bustle of the station; the moment of orientation when one emerges from the subway, on the other hand, needs to be conveyed as a transition from confusion to clarity.

The exhibit involves both formats, still and moving, installed in a way meant to echo the city: viewers can choose what to focus on but can’t prevent the rest of the world (the sounds and sights of nearby videos, not presented in isolation as is typical in a museum setting) from seeping in around the edges.

Goldberg says that the show’s title—Stories the City Tells Itself—is a reference to a story he in turn tells himself. In that fiction, the city, like the photographer, is observing its residents being alive. “I like to think of the moments as being overlooked by the people involved but existing for the pleasure of the city itself,” he says. “Maybe no one is noticing these people as the emerge from the subway or the little trapezoids of beautiful sky, but somehow the city itself is watching.”

The exhibit Stories the City Tells Itself is on view at the Museum of the City of New York through July 4. More information about Neil Goldberg can be found here.

Call Out – London-based collective Jur•nl seeks online responses and collaborators for experimental research zine

Wonder Valley, California, April 2012. Photo Miranda Gavin

JUR•NL CALLS FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
It’s a beautiful hot day in the UK so only a short post about a call I received from a collective asking for a contribution. I was more than happy to contribute a photo I took recently in Wonder Valley California as a stimulus. Since I sent it in, I’ve checked the website and some of the responses, both images and text, are intriguing and have got me thinking about the image again. This is the cyclical nature of work, you make it, look at it, re-look at it, have someone else look at it, and perhaps, in some small way, one’s initial response shifts.

I want to suggest to the collective that original contributor also responds to the image again so that this response can feed into the process. When I saw the photo and the images researched and quotes, I thought of a David Lynch quote from Catching the Big Fish that I would like to contribute. First, I need to find the book.

“jur•nl is a collective of five young London-based artists and photographers working together on an experimental collaborative project with professionals, whilst also engaging others in the communication between images themselves as well as creative research.

“The jur•nl concept takes a stimulus from an artist/photographer/professional and during the week, as a collective and network, they gather research in the form of images/text/video etc on their site. At the end of the week they come together as a group and create a single image in response to the stimulus. Now, the collective has widened tthe call and anyone can contribute creative research on the site, in response to the stimuli.

“From the content gathered on the site, jur•nl will create zines which will feature the public contributors work/research alongside professionals.

The creative research jur•nl is looking for can be photographs, drawings, text, video… absolutely anything in a creative or research format which relates to the stimulus of the week. So far established artists and photographers contributing have included Zed Nelson, Elina Brotherus and Emma Critchley with many more to come.

“Get in touch with your submissions and be sure to write your name when submitting so the work can be tagged with your name. Please feel free to ask questions via email, or other social networking sites.” (from the press release)

Twitter @jurnlcollective
Facebook: Jur•nl collective
[email protected]

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: art. research, collaboration, collective, David Lynch, Jur•nl, London College of Communication, Photography, Wonder Valley

Postcards From America: The Box Set

In May 2011, Magnum photographers Jim Goldberg, Susan Meiselas, Paolo Pellegrin, Alec Soth and Mikhael Subotzky, as well as writer Ginger Strand, set out from Austin, Texas in an RV. Two weeks and 1750 miles later, they arrived in Oakland, Calif.

Together, they documented their experience, the result of which is a new, limited edition book that launches this week. Postcards from America is a collection of objects: a book, five bumper stickers, a newspaper, two fold-outs, three cards, a poster and five zines, all in a signed and numbered box.

“We knew each other through Magnum, obviously, but we’d never actually tried to work together,” says Soth. “We wanted to see what that would be like, to see if we could create a kind of polyphonic sound. Hopefully the box book achieves that. It also gave us an opportunity to push each other creatively and conceptually, which I think has carried over into our individual work.”

The book does not attempt to document the American Southwest in y traditional sense. Instead, it uses the prototypically western experience of a road trip as an entry point into depicting the region. “Some of us are used to working only on immersive, multiyear projects,” says Subotzky. “Obviously this was very different. Doing it collectively brought a great energy and looseness to the work. The box, with all its moving and arrangeable pieces, really reflects that and reflects what we found on the road—a divided and often contradictory society, unsure about its identity and future.”

The Postcards from America box book, in a signed edition of 500, is available exclusively at www.postcards.magnumphotos.com 

The second Postcards from America project is scheduled to begin this April in Rochester, New York.

To read more about the project background on Lightbox click here. To read a dispatch from the project click here.

Details at the Bergen Kunsthall


One day, instead of one night, a burst of machine-gun fire will flash, if light cannot come otherwise, 2009. © Milica Tomić

Details

Exhibition on view:
September 9th–October 30th, 2011

Bergen Kunsthall:
Rasmus Meyers allé 5
5015 Bergen, Norway
+47 55 55 93 11

Details is the upcoming photography exhibit at the Bergen Kunsthall. Curated by the Croatian curatorial collective What, How and for Whom/WHW, the show focuses on Fascism in current times. The photographs of Trevor Paglen, one of the six international artists in the show, have been featured in Aperture magazine issue 191 and the current Fall issue, 204. Aperture also published Paglen’s book Invisible: Covert Operations and Classified Landscapes, a photographic monograph that explores the secret activities of the U.S. military and private intelligence agencies.