Tag Archives: Collage

John Stezaker Awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize

For more than 30 years, artist John Stezaker has used found images as his primary medium. In his compositions, black-and-white studio portraits become surreal two-faced beings; elsewhere, a woman’s face is replaced by the crashing white waves of an illustrated postcard. These collages, which use classic movie stills, vintage postcards and book illustrations, are sliced and re-arranged into entirely new forms—they’re simple constructions, but Stezaker’s eye for the uncanny makes them powerful.

On Sept. 3, Stezaker was awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, which recognizes a significant contribution to the medium of photography through exhibition or publication, for his presentation of photographic collages last year at the Whitechapel Gallery in London.

The £30,000 prize (about $48,000) is organized by The Photographers’ Gallery in London. “Stezaker’s work has been influential on a new generation of image-makers,” said Brett Rogers, the Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, in a statement. “Within the vastness of today’s image flow, Stezaker has managed to resurrect the power and uncanny mystery inherent in the still image using traditional photographic strategies, most especially collage.”

Stezaker’s exhibition at Whitechapel showcased work from the 1970s until today.

“I am dedicated to fascination—to image fascination, a fascination for the point at which the image becomes self-enclosed and autonomous. It does so through a series of processes of disjunction,” Stezaker said in a statement from Whitechapel.

John Stezaker is a London-based artist. See more of his work here.

An exhibition of the artists shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 is on display at The Photographers’ Gallery, London until Sept. 9.

Works on Paper by Ina Jang

During her last year of college at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, photographer Ina Jang began weaving paper cutouts into her images as a way of problem solving. “I started it because I was struggling to make images at the time,” the Brooklyn-based photographer says. “I was forcing myself to like everything—from the people I was working with to locations where I was shooting, so I started getting rid of the elements I didn’t like in the picture.”

Among her inspirations is Martin Margiela, a notoriously private fashion designer who avoids being photographed. “I admire how he visually deconstructed the language of fashion,” says Jang, who wanted to create her own language through the series featured here. “I liked the idea of using optical illusion and the two-dimensional quality of photography. I always go back and forth in experimenting with the combination of analog and digital manipulation in photographs. While working on the series, I enjoyed making images that allowed me to explore both approaches to photography. Additionally, having an anonymous character in the images have given me more freedom to relate myself to them. I wanted the images to effortlessly create its own language.”

From portraits to still-lifes, Jang covered up faces, shapes and spaces that she didn’t like and used paper to make new images. “I started with white space and filled it with stuff I like, such as painting or illustration,” she says. Jang graduated in 2010 with a B.F.A in photography, and though she’s no longer working on this particular series, Jang says she’ll continue incorporating layers into her photographs. Some of her new work is included in the gallery above, and her more recent work with paper cut-outs will be exhibited at the Hyères Festival of Fashion & Photography beginning April 27 in Hyères, France. “I’m still really into shapes and cutouts and collages,” she says. “So I think you’ll always see part of that in my work.”

Ina Jang is a Brooklyn-based photographer. Read more about her here. Her work will be exhibited at Christophe Guye Galerie in Zurich March 29 through June 2 and at the Hyères Festival beginning April 27.

Utopia/Dystopia: Construction and Destruction in Photography and Collage

Since the late 19th century, photographers have honed their craft to expose social and political truths existing in their surroundings. The use of collage has expanded on this exploration by allowing artists to reconfigure, cut and fragment photos to create entirely new images and conversations

Utopia/Dystopia: Construction and Destruction in Photography and Collage, a new exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (MFAH), features 150 years of collage, as well as photomontages and moving images, to present “alternative realities” of utopia or dystopia.

The exhibit has more than 100 works, from as early as the 1860s to the present, with origins spanning Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe. The show is organized around three themes: urban visions, figure construction and the quest for a utopian world, and contains pieces drawn from four museums and private holdings.

Utopia/Dystopia is the brainchild of MFAH associate photography curator, Yasufumi Nakamori. “In breaking and reassembling found images to create a new vision, artists have found collage and montage ideal for expressing utopian dreams and dystopian anxieties,” said Nakamori. Featured artists include El Lissitzky, Okanoue Toshiko, Herbert Bayer, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Thayer, among others, and although their work stems from different artistic movements—from Dada to Constructivism—all the artists embrace the compelling process of photography construction and destruction.

Utopia/Dystopia will be on display through June 10 as part of the FotoFest 2012 Biennial, the largest international photography festival in the U.S. 

Celestial at CCNY

Modern Day Halo #3, 2011, © Brea Souders

Exhibition on view:
January 20–March 3, 2012

The Camera Club of New York
The Arts Building
336 West 37th Street, Suite 206
New York, NY
(212) 260-9927

The Camera Club of New York presents Celestial, an exhibition arranged by guest curator Mark Alice Durant. Five photographic artists extend their views of our universe and the supernatural. The endless splendor of earth and space is researched and resolved through different sentiments and media: black and white photography, collage, charcoal drawings on negatives, film and performance.

The artists embrace imagination to represent the simplest and the most dramatic of celestial events. Intermediary substances are used, sprinkled across photographic paper, mimicking stars and constellations. Photograms and pinhole cameras are also utilized, representative of the capable nature of the photographic process, even through the most rudimentary of means.

Mark Alice Durant is an artist, writer, and curator. Durant’s photography has appeared in Aperture issue 199 and has contributed writing for issues 203, 196, and 195.

Exhibition on view:
January 20–March 3, 2012 

The Camera Club of New York
The Arts Building
336 West 37th Street, Suite 206
New York, NY

(212) 260-9927

iPhone photo series: 28 Destroyed Posters of Albanian Politicians

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

This is the second in a series of delightfully quirky photobooks of images made by Frederic Lezmi with his iPhone. Build Gaming PC 2013 . It’s not really a book; it’s more like a box of beautifully printed lithographs on heavy paper so you can take them out one by one to appreciate them (even frame them), shuffle the order, or arrange them as a grid on your wall… They are self-published in a signed limited edition of 100.

I like the fact that they are also ephemeral bits of street art, symbols of anarchy tempered with the beauty of collage, captured on the go with a camera phone, and filtered through a computer application that attempts to replicate the look of Polaroids. verify my listings . They also serve as sociological specimens from the streets of the youngest democracy in Europe.

See and read more here in Lens Culture.

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

Ruth Van Beek’s Hibernators

In the early 20th century, around the time cars filled our streets, planes found their way into our skies and cameras began to capture our daily life, we started to see space being cut up and transformed in art works. Inextricably linked to this rise of modern technology, collage art took on a new role. While once strictly fantastical, now collage could be utilized to visually pull together reality-based images of day-to-day life. In keeping with the fast pace of 20th-century life, multiple ideas could now exist within one frame.

This new way of creating photo collages took many forms in the past hundred years—seen most distinctly in the works of the Surrealists in the 1920s and the pop artists in the 1960s. Today’s generation of photo collage artists use everything from found images on the Internet and historical reportage to references appropriated from mass global media. Dutch artist Ruth van Beek’s newest book and installment of photo collages, Hibernators, represents this new direction of collage art.

Van Beek uses found photographs, amateur family photographs, newspaper clippings and magazine tears in her work, in which she tries to create something that never existed before. “I try to make the animals come to life again by cutting and folding the paper,” she says. “I restrain them in a new shape. This way I turn them into creatures that are silent like stones, but are also showing a tension.”

Van Beek’s work represents a more controlled, more intimate breed of collage work. Hibernators cuts and folds common domestic pets and animals into creatures that exist somewhere between photography and collage. Through van Beek’s handy work, the facial features of the animals are often removed—further abstracting them from a sense of space. With the loss of distinguishing features, the altered animals begin to take on new identities.

The Hibernators was published this month by RVB books.

Ruth van Beek graduated from the renowned Gerrit Rietveld Academie in 2002. She has shown her collage work both in her native Netherlands, as well as throughout Europe and North America.

Photographer #306: Francesca Galliani

Francesca Galliani, 1962, Italy, is a fine art photographer who lives and works in New York City. At the age of 19 she moved to the United States and received a BFA at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington. She does not limit herself merely to the photographic medium and could therefore best be described as a mixed media artist. To intensify her strong images she uses the methods of painting and collage. She writes words or short sentences, adds paint and other visual objects onto the original photographs. Francesca’s work has been exhibited extensively throughout the world and has been published in a vast amount of magazines and numerous catalogues and books. The following images come from the series Transgender, Nudes and Asia.


Website: www.gallianiphoto.com

Photographer #277: Daniel Sannwald

Daniel Sannwald, 1979, Germany, is a surreal and experimental fashion photographer. He studied at the Royal Academy in Antwerp. Daniel does not limit himself when making images, nor does he abide to the rules of photography. He might shoot digital or analogue, change his end results with photoshop or just plain scissors and glue, make a collage or add bizarre objects on the set. He might go over the top with an image and keep it simple and clean with the next. Daniel keeps all options open and decided to use all the options available. The images he produces are fantastical, often surreal and innovative. His cinematographic photographs have been published in magazines as Dazed & Confused, i-D and Vogue Homme. Recently his book Pluton & Charon was released covering fashion work from the last five years. The following images come from his portfolio.

 

 

Website: www.danielsannwald.com