Tag Archives: Cohesive Body

Summer Songs of the Russian Riviera

In 2004, when photographer Rob Hornstra wanted to publish his first cohesive body of work in a book, he ran into a common problem—he couldn’t find a publisher who was willing to fund it. Hornstra’s solution was less than common: he decided to raise the initial funds himself by selling copies in advance via word of mouth and social networking. It took a month, but he succeeded. Hornstra decided to jump start the publication of his next two books the same way, with each volume of pre-orders selling out more quickly than the last. Hornstra is now on his sixth book (plus newspapers, postcards, prints and posters), and still relies primarily on his own crowdfunding efforts to fund them and their related projects. Crowdfunding and self-publishing are less rare these days, but that is thanks in part to pioneers like Hornstra whose distinctive eye and determination helped blaze the trail to get important work to receptive audiences without the backing of traditional journalistic and publishing outlets.

Hornstra’s latest book is on the restaurant singers of Russia’s favorite Black Sea resort town of Sochi. Any self-respecting restaurant on the coast has a live house singer to belt out sappy Russian chansons—take a vodka-soaked ballad and drop in a techno beat, all at full volume—from behind an electric keyboard or a laptop. Sochi is the center of the world, as far as this type of live entertainment is concerned, and Hornstra saw it as the perfect metaphor to depict the city and the region, traveling to more than 60 restaurants over 100 miles of coastline in 2011 to make the 37 photos for the book. The pictures mercifully strip away the noise of the music and cancel out the dark rooms and sharp flashing lights with Hornstra’s trademark, even lighting, allowing the viewer to patiently examine every telling detail of the interiors, including the faux Greek, French, Roman, Slavic and American décor.

Sochi Singers is in fact only the latest installment of The Sochi Project, Hornstra’s five-year commitment to exploring the region in the years leading up to the 2014 Winter Olympics Games, which Sochi will host exactly two years from this month. Partnering with writer and filmmaker Arnold van Bruggen, who wrote the essay in Sochi Singers, his goal is to paint a more complete picture of the area than the public is likely to see during those few short weeks in 2014. They have already traveled to a Soviet-era sanatorium outside of Sochi and the troubled region of Abkhazia and the Republic of Georgia, located only 13 miles along the coast to the southeast. Next month they plan to travel to the Caucasus mountains to the east, and the infamous breakaway republics of Dagestan, North Ossetia and Chechnya.

As Russia cycles into the news again next month when former president Vladimir Putin will likely be voted back into office, it is Hornstra’s commitment to “slow journalism” that allows audiences to put the headlines in context, as well as to see past the propaganda and pomp and circumstance that will inevitably surround the Winter Games. By examining the stark contrasts contained within the small region of the world, and recording both what changes—and what remains the same—Hornstra’s work reflects something deeper and more historic: Russia’s continuing search for a post-Soviet identity.

Rob Hornstra is a Dutch photographer. Learn more about the Sochi project hereThe Sochi Singers series recently won first place for the Arts and Entertainment—Stories category at the World Press Photo awards.

Submissions, Sites, and Sellebrites

I get lots of mail from a variety of places, sources, and people, and because tomorrow is the Father’s Day post (I usually post calls for entry, etc on Sundays), I am sharing a some of sites and calls for entry to explore, and tossing in a few images from my past celebrity/Royals work for your viewing pleasure….

GREAT QUIRKY SITE
http://dearphotograph.com/

NEW CAMERA AT THE LOMO STORE
Lomography’s new La Sardina Camera, the fresh and unique 35mm Fish Can Super-wide-angle Camera is now available.

NEW SITE TO COMPARE LENSES
http://camera-lenses.findthebest.com/

TOY CAMERA CALL FOR ENTRY
http://www.toyedwithphoto.com/

HEY HOT SHOT CALL FOR ENTRY– Just a few more days to submit!
http://www.heyhotshot.com/

CAMERA CLUB CALL FOR ENTRY
CCNY’s 2011 NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION CALL FOR ENTRIES
Juror: Richard Renaldi
Deadline: Monday, June 27, 2011

The Camera Club of New York (CCNY) is pleased to announce an open call for applications for its Annual National Photography Competition. Photographers and photo-based artists working in any genre are eligible to apply. Applicants are encouraged to submit a cohesive body of work.

Selected applicants will be featured in an exhibition at the CCNY gallery in the summer of 2011 and on our website. The first place selection will receive a $500.00 cash award.

This year marks the first time that CCNY will be using a completely online submission service, CallForEntry.org (CAFÈ) There is no extra fee for submitting through CAFÈ, and once you register to the CAFÈ system, you are more easily able to access other calls for entry and submit to those using a standardized procedure. CCNY will only be accepting entries submitted through this system. Click here to submit now or see more detailed guidelines.

ABOUT US:
One of New York’s oldest not-for-profit arts organizations, the Camera Club of New York (CCNY) is a workspace for photographers and a hub for the photo community, offering exhibitions, lectures, workshops, an online newsletter and Guest Blog, and a year-round Darkroom Residency Program. Today, CCNY is a thriving base for a diverse community interested in both traditional and experimental directions in photography.

ABOUT THE JUROR:
Richard Renaldi was born in 1968 in Chicago, Illinois, and received his BFA in photography from New York University. Exhibitions of his photographs have been mounted in galleries and museums throughout the United States and Europe, including the House of Photography in Stockholm; The Robert Morat Gallery in Hamburg; The Nicolaysen Museum in Casper, Wyoming; the Gallery at Hermès and Yossi Milo Gallery in New York. Renaldi’s work has also been exhibited in numerous group shows, including Strangers: The First ICP (International Center of Photography) Triennial of Photography and Video (2003). In 2006 Renaldi’s first monograph, Figure and Ground, was published by the Aperture Foundation. His second monograph, Fall River Boys, was released in 2009 by Charles Lane Press. Richard Renaldi is the founder and publisher of Charles Lane Press. His website is www.renaldi.com.

PRIZES:
Selected applicants will be featured in an exhibition at the CCNY gallery in late July to late August 2011. Winners will also be featured on the CCNY website. The first place selection will receive a $500.00 cash award. Sales will be encouraged. (A 30% commission applies to all sales.)

ENTRY:
The competition is open to all U.S. residents 18 years or older who are CCNY members. Staff, board members, workspace fellows, artists-in-residence, and their families are not eligible. Only photographs or photo-based work will be considered.

FEE:
There is no fee to apply. All applicants must be active members of the CCNY. A one-year Participating Membership is $40. Other levels of membership, that in addition include darkroom access, could be viewed on the CCNY membership page.

Participating Member benefits:
• free entry CCNY’s Lecture Series at The School of Visual Arts
• 10% discount on classes, workshops, private lessons and book sales
• portfolio review with CCNY staff or Board member (limit one review per year)
• free entry to competitions and juried exhibitions
• special access to CCNY programming and news

Wendy Laurel just launced a new blog, Let the Kids Dress Themselves, and she is looking for any type of portrait photography to feature on the blog. If you are interested follow the submission guidelines here.

What Is An MFA Thesis?

Victoria Hely-Hutchinson

The below is taken from the SVA Photo, Video and Related Media Department information packet on the MFA thesis process. The second year of the program is heavily focused on the process so I thought I ought share what it’s all about.

What is a Thesis?

The thesis project is the main and most significant aspect of your masters year work. The thesis project is a creative endeavor and an original investigation of a specific viewpoint. Because the MFA degree is a terminal degree in this field, it is expected that the project be at the highest level of visual artistic work. It must be a cohesive body of work. It must bear up to the scrutiny of the creative community, and further our understanding of its specific investigation.

The project follows as a result of the candidates thesis proposal as a unique body of artwork, demonstrating the capacity to push the limits of what is possible in the multi-faceted realms of the visual arts. It will be understood and evaluated within the terms that you yourself define. This definition comes from your written proposal as well as your thesis statement (which are due in mid- November and mid-March respectively). They are meant to direct and define the goals and terms, which render your work significant.

The main component of the thesis is a body of work completed by the student during the spring semester that employs photographic, video, film, computer- generated images, or related practices. Accompanying this portfolio is a supporting paper that documents and assesses the development of that work.

An independent committee of three faculty members will evaluate the finished project through a process called Thesis Orals. The student will supply their paper to the committee prior to the student presenting their project in front of the committee. While subjectivity is inherent in such judgments, be assured that the committee’s demand for quality will be unbending. Any student who does not receive a passing grade for thesis will not be eligible for degree conferral.

Preparation

Together, a portfolio, thesis proposal and thesis paper reflect an academic year’s worth of intensive exploration and accomplishment. The spring semester of your second year will be an intense period during which creative work and production develops into a cohesive whole. Plasma TVs . This process begins long before the spring semester in the summer of your first year at the latest. Before beginning of the fall semester of your thesis year, you should already be examining your work critically, considering what creative direction you might be heading into and where you are aiming to be in six months. Discuss your work and ideas with the Chairperson, your peers, critique instructors, and your other sources of creative inspiration. Get your creative juices flowing and focus your thinking into a raw concept for your project. Remember that it is always best to set realistic goals for the size and scope of the project based on your personal funds, necessary equipment, and other resources.

Fall Semester

Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is a carefully thought out plan for your masters thesis project, and will be due during the week of November 15th. (If you are planning on working with video in your thesis project, you must commit to video by October 2nd, 2010). Your proposal should state the medium and general format of your intended thesis project, to be completed during the spring semester. It should reflect the research and consideration you have given to the formulation of your project, the projects central idea(s), as well as the specific means you intend to utilize in order to synthesize or realize these ideas within the proposed format. This proposal should show an awareness of the historical and cultural context in which your work is situated as well as its influences, and personal or social factors that bear upon its significance in a larger cultural milieu.

All thesis proposals must be written in proper English and should be copy edited for spelling and punctuation. Your thesis proposal should function as a strategy or game plan that facilitates, directs, and focuses the body of your project. It is meant to serve as a plan for you and your faculty, as well as a reference for understanding the ideas, goals, and intentions of your project. A preliminary visual representation of your work is required with the thesis proposal. You may also include visual references of others work if beneficial to the overall understanding and concept, however this is not required.

Spring Semester

Students entering their thesis project semester (typically spring of 2nd year) must also have completed all required coursework, have a B+ average to date (3.3 GPA), no outstanding incomplete grades, and no student account “holds” for failure to meet financial obligations.

Thesis Paper

The thesis paper is a supporting document and should not eclipse the artwork. Nonetheless, an MFA degree requires verbal and written evidence of both intelligent, creative decision-making, and an awareness of the historical and contemporary context of the work.

Your thesis statement (paper), which will accompany your thesis project, should state the form (medium/format) of your thesis project, as well as the main idea or ideas that you have explored. It should locate your work within a historical and cultural context and state the reasons, personal or social, for addressing these concerns. It is expected that your thesis project will make a contribution to the culture it addresses. It should, therefore, place itself within a larger sense of the world and your personal concerns should be articulated with an awareness of their historical position. This statement need not be long, but it should be clear and focused. This statement will serve as an archive or notation of the project you have completed and should compliment the more extensive analysis you have outlined in your proposal.

Statements should be in clear, concise English and copy edited for grammar, punctuation, and spelling. This statement need not exceed five pages in length. The faculty committee on your Orals panel will have read it and will use it as a guideline to understanding and interpreting your project. Each students final thesis statement will be bound and archived with a record of your project. Visual representations, either photos or diagrams of your work or others, may be incorporated into the paper but are not necessary.

Thesis Oral Presentation

Each candidate will be required to present and orally defend their work in a twenty minute closed session before a committee of three faculty members on Saturday, April 2nd, 2010. As stated previously, your thesis paper will be given to the committee prior to the oral presentation so that the committee will approach your work with an awareness of your ideas.

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What Is An MFA Thesis?

Victoria Hely-Hutchinson

The below is taken from the SVA Photo, Video and Related Media Department information packet on the MFA thesis process. The second year of the program is heavily focused on the process so I thought I ought share what it’s all about.

What is a Thesis?

The thesis project is the main and most significant aspect of your masters year work. The thesis project is a creative endeavor and an original investigation of a specific viewpoint. Because the MFA degree is a terminal degree in this field, it is expected that the project be at the highest level of visual artistic work. It must be a cohesive body of work. It must bear up to the scrutiny of the creative community, and further our understanding of its specific investigation.

The project follows as a result of the candidates thesis proposal as a unique body of artwork, demonstrating the capacity to push the limits of what is possible in the multi-faceted realms of the visual arts. It will be understood and evaluated within the terms that you yourself define. This definition comes from your written proposal as well as your thesis statement (which are due in mid- November and mid-March respectively). They are meant to direct and define the goals and terms, which render your work significant.

The main component of the thesis is a body of work completed by the student during the spring semester that employs photographic, video, film, computer- generated images, or related practices. Accompanying this portfolio is a supporting paper that documents and assesses the development of that work.

An independent committee of three faculty members will evaluate the finished project through a process called Thesis Orals. The student will supply their paper to the committee prior to the student presenting their project in front of the committee. While subjectivity is inherent in such judgments, be assured that the committee’s demand for quality will be unbending. Any student who does not receive a passing grade for thesis will not be eligible for degree conferral.

Preparation

Together, a portfolio, thesis proposal and thesis paper reflect an academic year’s worth of intensive exploration and accomplishment. The spring semester of your second year will be an intense period during which creative work and production develops into a cohesive whole. This process begins long before the spring semester in the summer of your first year at the latest. Before beginning of the fall semester of your thesis year, you should already be examining your work critically, considering what creative direction you might be heading into and where you are aiming to be in six months. Discuss your work and ideas with the Chairperson, your peers, critique instructors, and your other sources of creative inspiration. Get your creative juices flowing and focus your thinking into a raw concept for your project. Remember that it is always best to set realistic goals for the size and scope of the project based on your personal funds, necessary equipment, and other resources.

Fall Semester

Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is a carefully thought out plan for your masters thesis project, and will be due during the week of November 15th. (If you are planning on working with video in your thesis project, you must commit to video by October 2nd, 2010). Your proposal should state the medium and general format of your intended thesis project, to be completed during the spring semester. It should reflect the research and consideration you have given to the formulation of your project, the projects central idea(s), as well as the specific means you intend to utilize in order to synthesize or realize these ideas within the proposed format. This proposal should show an awareness of the historical and cultural context in which your work is situated as well as its influences, and personal or social factors that bear upon its significance in a larger cultural milieu.

All thesis proposals must be written in proper English and should be copy edited for spelling and punctuation. Your thesis proposal should function as a strategy or game plan that facilitates, directs, and focuses the body of your project. It is meant to serve as a plan for you and your faculty, as well as a reference for understanding the ideas, goals, and intentions of your project. A preliminary visual representation of your work is required with the thesis proposal. You may also include visual references of others work if beneficial to the overall understanding and concept, however this is not required.

Spring Semester

Students entering their thesis project semester (typically spring of 2nd year) must also have completed all required coursework, have a B+ average to date (3.3 GPA), no outstanding incomplete grades, and no student account “holds” for failure to meet financial obligations.

Thesis Paper

The thesis paper is a supporting document and should not eclipse the artwork. Nonetheless, an MFA degree requires verbal and written evidence of both intelligent, creative decision-making, and an awareness of the historical and contemporary context of the work.

Your thesis statement (paper), which will accompany your thesis project, should state the form (medium/format) of your thesis project, as well as the main idea or ideas that you have explored. It should locate your work within a historical and cultural context and state the reasons, personal or social, for addressing these concerns. It is expected that your thesis project will make a contribution to the culture it addresses. It should, therefore, place itself within a larger sense of the world and your personal concerns should be articulated with an awareness of their historical position. This statement need not be long, but it should be clear and focused. This statement will serve as an archive or notation of the project you have completed and should compliment the more extensive analysis you have outlined in your proposal.

Statements should be in clear, concise English and copy edited for grammar, punctuation, and spelling. couples counseling . This statement need not exceed five pages in length. The faculty committee on your Orals panel will have read it and will use it as a guideline to understanding and interpreting your project. Each students final thesis statement will be bound and archived with a record of your project. Visual representations, either photos or diagrams of your work or others, may be incorporated into the paper but are not necessary.

Thesis Oral Presentation

Each candidate will be required to present and orally defend their work in a twenty minute closed session before a committee of three faculty members on Saturday, April 2nd, 2010. As stated previously, your thesis paper will be given to the committee prior to the oral presentation so that the committee will approach your work with an awareness of your ideas.

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