Tag Archives: Close Friends

Rémi Ochlik’s Revolutions

“War is worse than drugs. One moment it’s a bad trip, a nightmare. But the next moment, as soon as the immediate danger has passed, there is an overpowering desire to go back for more. To risk one’s life in order to get more pictures in return for not very much. It is an incomprehensible force that pushes us to keep going back in.”

Rmi Ochlik, 2004

This spring, after French war photographer Rmi Ochlik was killed during fighting in Homs, Syria, a group of close friends and colleagues felt their obligations to the photographer weren’t complete. Meeting aboard a TGV train on their way to Paris from the World Press awards ceremony in Amsterdam in late April, the group took stock of everything that had happened since Rmi’s death. find personal injury attorney . His photographs had spoken for themselves when exhibited in tribute in Amsterdam. The large circle of friends gathered in his name was a testament to his character; he was always the guy who would make friends sharing a cigarette. But one duty remained unfinishednot a tribute, nor a memorial, but a commitment to continue what was and what should have been in Rmi’s life.

Now, five months later, Revolutions is finisheda book of 144 pages, across which Rmi’s photographs of the Arab Spring spread forth. The tome depicts hope, anger, celebration and fearsome of humanity’s most powerful emotions recorded in photographsand feelings the photographer undoubtedly felt during a career cut short by the harsh realities often facing those documenting armed conflict.

Scattered through this visual record of Rmi’s witness are the words of friends, which encompass close confidants, long-time coworkers and fellow photographers. Their testimonies are short, speaking to the memories of a man killed at a time and place in the world many photographers hesitated to cover.

Ochlikbegan his photography of the Arab Spring in Tunisiaand so the book does the same. “It is impressive to see the ease with which he moves through the street as the rocks fly everywhere,” writes Julien De Rosa of his shared time with Rmi outside Tahrir Square in Cairo. “This is clearly his natural environment.”

Rmi, considered by colleagues an old-school photographer despite his youngage (29), moved with confidence and resolve through the borders of conflict in the Middle East. This is what makes his death that much more painful, for at his age and with his skill, his potential had seemed limitless.

“Be safe, okay?” were the last words that Gert Van Langendonck told Rmi before his final trip to the besieged city of Homs. “You’ve already won your World Press Photo.” And indeed Rmi’s work was deserving of high honorhis story from Libya earned him first prize in the 2012 World Press Photo competition’s General News category. His photographic eye was strongstrengthening, evenas he entered Syria. A vision deserving of high honor, cut short by a barrage of shelling that also killed American correspondent Marie Colvin.

Rmi was often aware that he didn’t have a personal project in the works, Van Langendonck told TIME. Personal projects provide an outlet for photographers to explore their interests outside of commissioned editorial work, allowing for an inner-consistency even as a photographer’s surroundings are rapidly changing. So caught up in his work, Remi didn’t need it “I’ve never had so many of my pictures published in my life,” he told Van Langendonck.

After paying the ultimate price for his work, Rmi’s personal project became clear. Although the future promise of the French photographer will never be fully realized, the publishing of Revolutions has brought a modicum of closure.

Revolutions is nowavailable through Emphas.is. The book project, funded by contributors, raised $24,250 as of Sept. 4, exceeding its original fundraising target of $15,000 by almost 40%.

Revisiting Misrata, After Tim and Chris

TIME contract photographer Yuri Kozyrev and I recently spent two weeks driving across Libya, from east to west, surveying the aftermath of the Arab Spring’s most thorough revolution to get a sense of the lessons learned and the challenges that still lie ahead for the vast, oil-rich country. The war-ravaged city of Misrata was one of the key stops on our journey, not only for its significance as perhaps the most brutally repressed flashpoint in Libya’s uprising against Muammar Gaddafi, but also because of its significance on the emotional map of many foreign correspondents who covered this war, myself and Yuri included. Yuri lost one of his close friends here, Tim Hetherington. Hetherington, an award-winning British photographer and director, was killed along with the great American photographer Chris Hondros, while covering the fighting on Misrata’s Tripoli Street on April 20, 2011. The two had travelled, along with other journalists, to Misrata by boat from the rebel-held eastern city of Benghazi.

At the time, Misrata was under a fierce and brutal siege by Gaddafi’s forces, but the city had become a symbol of the Libyan resistance—and Gaddafi’s violent tactics to stop it. Yuri was in frequent contact with Hetherington at the time, hoping to make the same perilous journey by boat. “I thought it was very important to go there,” he told LightBox this month. “It was almost impossible to cover the war from the eastern front line, and Misrata was a hotspot.”

Yuri never made it there; the sudden deaths of Hetherington and Hondros put an end to those plans. So our trip last month marked his first visit. “We had never heard about Misrata before the war, but when the war happened, Misrata was a very important place. And not just Misrata, but Tripoli Street,” he says. “For me it was on a personal level. It was in the news, and everybody mentioned it. But for me, it’s also about friends.”

Seeing Tripoli Street was hard for Yuri. There were moments, as we surveyed the wreckage, moving silently past block after block of shell-shocked neighborhoods, that I could see the grief on his face. Misrata’s war museum—“The Ali Hassan Gaber Exhibit,” named for the al-Jazeera cameraman killed covering the revolution—is something we came across by chance on our first day in the city. In it, Misrata’s residents and former fighters have meticulously documented the horrors of their city’s experience in war. There are rows of rockets, missiles, and tanks; clothing and furniture hauled away from Gaddafi’s compound in Tripoli; photographs of the rebels’ gruesome injuries; official documents detailing regime corruption; and the portraits of all 1,215 of the city’s martyrs. Yuri told Lightbox what it was like to visit the exhibit, set amid the destruction on Misrata’s Tripoli Street: “Inside there are hundreds of portraits of Libyans who were killed. When I walked through, looking through these portraits for the dates they were killed, suddenly I stopped. On the left side there were two portraits of Tim and Chris.”

Misrata’s residents are keen never to forget the details of this horrific point in their history. Indeed, everywhere we traveled in Libya, we found similar efforts to immortalize the names and faces of those lost; and the tragic events that transpired. But all along Tripoli Street, there is also rebirth, and there is hope. New billboards and storefronts have sprung up from the city’s ashes. Uniformed traffic cops in white gloves patrol intersections—despite the absence of a fully functioning central government. And construction workers in orange vests clear rubble and tend to new flowers in the grassy medians. Stores selling wedding dresses and school supplies have re-opened their ground floor display windows; even as the gaping holes caused by rockets and tank shells remain to be fixed just above. “There are a lot of signs of war but you can see that there is life,” Yuri says. “There is life in different ways, girls on the street, boys on motorbikes, and flower shops.”

“At the same time I didn’t want to do any kind of investigation [into Tim and Chris’ deaths], to try to understand what happened,” he says. “It happened. It happened last year, and I remember it, and that’s it. I was not in the mood yet to try to understand. I know that’s the street. I know that’s the place.”

Abigail Hauslohner is TIME’s Cairo correspondent.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Photographer #311: Lauren Dukoff

Lauren Dukoff, 1984, USA, is a portrait photographer. A vast amount of celebrities have been in front of her lens including Beyonce, Katy Perry, Sting and Beck. Her most known picture might be the cover of the album 21 by Adele. Lauren has also directed videos for Adele, Isobel Campbell & Mark Lanegan and Devendra Banhart. For several years Lauren had been photographing close friends and Devendra Banhart, including an extended family of artists who share inspiration. The images were released in the book Family in 2009. It includes portraits and candid images of Devendra and many other artists, individually or together, in performance or in more private spaces. Her images have been published in numerous magazines as Rolling Stone, Dazed & Confused and L’Uomo Vogue. The following images come from her portfolios and her diary.

Website: www.laurendukoff.com

workshop plus…

I always tell my workshop students on the first day that my one week workshops actually go on forever…That is, if a student stays in touch with me and continues to produce compelling work , I do stay on as a lifetime mentor…The picture above is proof…Chris Bickford (left) with Burn readers Roberta Tavares and her twin sister neurologist Dr. Renata Tavares (background) in Lapa area of Rio de Janeiro with Lance Rosenfield (right) …Chris and Lance have both survived my New York loft class several years ago and remain close friends…Chris’ essay on New Orleans Mardi Gras will show up here on Burn on Monday. Lance, on Burn with Thirst for Grit, has just formed a photographers coop PRIME and several photographers in his coop have been published here like Charlie Mahoney with his essay Troubled Paradise. So my alums are rockin.

I am trying to set a good example for them as well. This week I am in Rio shooting on my own, and will pick up with my NatGeo assignment next week after Carnaval. After all I did DO in a big way Carnaval last year for NatGeo Magazine and for NG television. Thank you NatGeo. So now I am here just taking pictures for myself and possible book/iPad book and hanging with my buddies/students/friends….Hey, the ultimate spring break!! Normally it would not work to have other photographers around while I am doing my thing , but in this case it just flat out rocks..We are laughing ,talking pictures, and shooting like hell as you might well imagine. The competitive spirit works in this case because there is plenty of material to go around. Well, after all, it is a party for heavens sake with the whole world invited…

And of course the obvious. Anyone who really knows me personally will know some of MY best work will come from this week…No doubt about it. I thrive having family and friends around. Always have.

In the Mississippi Blues workshop class I am doing upcoming in April, I will be out shooting with my students as well…i also do this in Oaxaca, Mexico class…Always fun and on subjects where everyone is spread out and not tripping over each other.

Well you may imagine I have way better pics than the one above. Just used this to make a point. mozilla firefox free . Saving the hot sexy totally outrageous ones for later. Make sense? Stay tuned.

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