Tag Archives: Choice Award

Europe Week: Sofie Knijff

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares a week of European photographers, today with Sofie Knijff. A huge thank you to Jacqueline for her insight and efforts.

Sofie Knijff graduated from the Fotoacademie Amsterdam in 2007 after a career in the world of theatre. She has won numerous awards such as the Netherlands Photo Academy Award, the Harry Penning’s Award and the FOTO 8 “People’s Choice” Award (UK). In 2011, she received a grant from the Sem Presser Fund and in 2012 from the Mondriaan Foundation. Nominated Emerging Artist by the Fotomuseum Winthertur in Switzerland, her work has since been widely exhibited in Europe and in the US.

Her series Translations will be published by Kehrer Verlag.

Sofie comments on the European photography scene:  Photography is recognized and rising as an art form among collectors and galleries. In the Netherlands, we also have Art foundations that support the development of Dutch photography and some internationally known photobook designers (Kummer & Hermann, SYB, Teun van der Heijden, Hans Gremmen).

The work presented is a selection of images from my series “Translations”. Over the past 3 years I have traveled through Mali, India ,South- Africa, Brazil and Greenland. Portraying children and their fantasy world. My aim was to isolate these children from their surroundings, and daily life, and focus their attention in order to reveal their own “dream character”.

 By using the same backdrop, I created a stage on which the dreams could come to life. The challenge was to build a subtle level concentration to capture the moment of transformation. At the same time, I took images of the empty spaces in which these children live; allowing to create a set of portraits where the inside and outside mirror and influence one another.

Opportunities Abound

In case today allows for some time to submit to things, I wanted to share two calls for entry that I have the pleasure of juroring, and several other submission opportunities…..

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The A Smith Gallery in Johnson City, Texas is offering an photography competition on Imagination and I am the juror!

i-mag-i-na-tion: fabrication, fantasy, illusion, imagery, insight, inspiration, originality, thought, vision, creation, creativity, inventiveness realization.

“A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral”. –Antoine de Saint Exupery

“I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them.” –Pablo Picasso

Entry Deadline:
January 9, 2012

Exhibition dates:
February 17, 2012 to April 1, 2012

Imagination feeds the need to photograph. Since I can remember, I have loved to create with my mind and my hands. This desire was instilled by a mother and grandmother who shared the same compulsion. These imaginative women taught me to dream and experiment.

“I-mag-i-na-tion” is your opportunity to imagine and create. Get outside the conventional with this one. Don’t just photograph the pear; hide it underneath a cloth napkin and see what happens.

Forty-five images will be selected for exhibition and a Blurb full color catalog of the exhibit will be available for purchase. Cash prizes of $250 each will be awarded for The Juror’s Award and The Director’s Award, along with a $100 prize for the Visitors’ Choice Award. There will also be five Honorable Mentions.

Creativity is encouraged.

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Cell Phone Photographers submit to the iSpy: Camera Phone Photography Exhibition!

I am happy to be the juror for the upcoming iSpy: Camera Phone Photography at The Kiernan Gallery in Lexington, VA.

Due Date: January 26th

Exhibition dates: March 6 – April 7th

Photography has always had a special place in art as a technology-driven medium. It has evolved from glass plates to film, to the 35mm, disposable cameras; to the digital revolution, always becoming more and more accessible. The camera-phone is the most recent incarnation of this evolution, and it has impacted photojournalism and fine art photography as much as everyday snapshots. For iSpy: Camera Phone Photography, The Kiernan Gallery seeks images taken with cell phones that span all genres of photography.

Only images taken with a cellular phone will be accepted for this exhibition. Use of apps (e.g. Hipstamatic, Instagram, Darkroom, Tiltshift, Pano, etc.) is acceptable and encouraged.

For this exhibition, juror Aline Smithson will select up to 40 images for display in the main gallery, and up to an additional 30 to be included in the online gallery. All images will be reproduced in an exhibition catalogue available for purchase. A Juror’s Choice and Director’s Choice will also be announced.

Submit here!

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Educators that are members of the Society of Photographic Educators, Submit!

Call for Entry: SPE Member Show at the Rayko Photo Gallery in San Francisco.

Submissions due: January 16, 2012 11:59pm (pst)
Best of Show – 1 year membership in SPE and conference registration to SPE’s 49th national conference in San Francisco

This competition is open to artists holding current membership in Society for Photographic Education (SPE) and is organized in conjunction with SPE’s 49th national conference, Intimacy and Voyeurism: The Public/Private Divide in Photography, March 22-25, 2012 in San Francisco, California. The exhibition will be on view at RayKo Photo Center during the SPE national conference and feature an opening reception open to all attendees of the event. The RayKo Gallery offers over 1600 square feet of exhibition space and presents eight to ten shows annually featuring nationally recognized artists.

JUROR: Todd Hido is a San Francisco Bay Area-based artist whose work has been featured in Artforum, The New York Times Magazine, Eyemazing, Metropolis, The Face, I-D, and Vanity Fair. His photographs are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, as well as in many other public and private collections. He has over a dozen published books, the latest monograph being A Road Divided, released in 2010.
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This is a very cool Juried competition that results in a book of Photography, Poetry and Prose….

“Fading Light” Juried Photo Competition

Open to Interpretation is now calling on photographers to submit images for consideration in a juried book competition.

Project Details
Open to Interpretation is a collaborative book project bringing together photographers, poets and writers. Each book begins with a themed call for photos. The chosen photos become the literary inspiration for the writers’ submissions. A book is created that matches each winning photo with two stories or poems that offer different interpretations of the image. The unique collaboration adds new dimensions to both the photos and the written word.

Book Title: Open to interpretation
Theme: Fading Light
Juror: George Slade, Principal at re: photographica
Submission Fee: $40 for 5 images, $10 each additional
Deadline for submission: March 15, 2012
Early Entry: $10 discount if submitted by January 19, 2012
Results Announced: March 30, 2012

Awards
$300 Judge’s Selection Award

Judge
George Slade has provided fine photographic artists and their audiences with insightful interpretation and curatorial expertise in exhibitions, classes, writings, lectures, and face-to-face exchanges for over 25 years. Formerly the artistic director of Minnesota Center for Photography, the director of the McKnight Artist Fellowships for Photographers Program, and recently the curator at the Photographic Resource Center in Boston, George is a veteran presence at portfolio review events like Fotofest, Photolucida, Critical Mass, PhotoNOLA, and the Society for Photographic Education’s regional and national conferences. In the last three years he juried regional and national exhibitions for the Coalition of Photographic Arts (Milwaukee), New Directions 2009 at the Wallspace Gallery (Seattle), the 2011 Clarence John Laughlin Award at the New Orleans Photographic Alliance, the New England Photography Biennial at the Danforth Museum of Art (Framingham, MA), and IRevelar at the Naomi Silva Gallery in Atlanta. George received a 2007 award from the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program; his writings and reviews appear extensively in print and online; some may be found at his web site, re:photographica. He lives in Minneapolis with his partner Stephanie and their children.

Entries are submitted online at http://www.open2interpretation.com/submit_fading_light.html

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F STOP Magazine

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

ISSUE #51: The Portrait – February/March 2012

What makes a portrait a portrait? How is it different from a snapshot, still life or a landscape? Do we learn who a person is from a portrait or do we learn more about the photographer? The portrait is the subject of issue #51.

Submit up to 12 images following the guidelines below. Images must be received by January 15.
Issue #51 will have an expected publication date of February 1, 2012. Only one submission per person for an issue.

ISSUE #52: Open Theme – April/May 2012

Issue #52 will have an open theme.

Submit up to 12 images following the guidelines below. Images must be received by March 15.
Issue #52 will have an expected publication date of April 1, 2012. Only one submission per person for an issue.

Use your imagination and submit!

The A Smith Gallery in Johnson City, Texas is offering an photography competition on Imagination and I am the juror!

i-mag-i-na-tion: fabrication, fantasy, illusion, imagery, insight, inspiration, originality, thought, vision, creation, creativity, inventiveness realization.

A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral. Antoine de Saint Exupery

I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them. Pablo Picasso

Entry Deadline:
January 9, 2012

Exhibition dates:
February 17, 2012 to April 1, 2012

Imagination feeds the need to photograph. Since I can remember, I have loved to create with my mind and my hands. This desire was instilled by a mother and grandmother who shared the same compulsion. These imaginative women taught me to dream and experiment.

I-mag-i-na-tion is your opportunity to imagine and create. Get outside the conventional with this one. Chiropractor Sherman Oaks . Dont just photograph the pear; hide it underneath a cloth napkin and see what happens.

Forty-five images will be selected for exhibition and a Blurb full color catalog of the exhibit will be available for purchase. Cash prizes of $250 each will be awarded for The Jurors Award and The Directors Award, along with a $100 prize for the Visitors Choice Award. There will also be five Honorable Mentions. online radio luisteren .

Creativity is encouraged.

Success Stories: Alia Malley

I first became aware of Alia Malley’s stunning images when I co-curated an exhibition for the Photo Arts Council of the Los Angeles County Art Museum. I spent a day gallery sitting and found myself returning to her images, which in person are incredibly beautiful. There was something painterly and timeless about the work, but also something familiar. I finally realized that I was looking at a landscape that I had traversed many times, but had never found it particularly interesting, and certainly not beautiful. And that realization changed how I look at where I live.

Alia was born in La Jolla, a community just north of San Diego in California, and was raised in Portland, Oregon. She received her BA in Critical Studies from USC School of Cinematic Arts, and her MFA f rom University of California, Riverside in 2010. Her project Southland won the 2011 CENTER Dealer ʼs Choice Award, juried by Dianne Vanderlip, Curator, Gagosian Gallery, Los Angeles, CA & Curator Emeritus, Denver Art Museum. Southland was also awarded the 2010 Merck Prize at the Darmstädter Tage der Fotograie, and was presented as a solo exhibition at Sam Lee Galley, Los Angeles in 2010. She was a 2009 Runner Up at the Forward Thinking Museum/JGS, and a Finalist /Honorable Mention at the Newspace Center for Photographyʼs 2008 Juried Exhibit ion, curated by TJ Norris. All of this certainly makes Alia’s journey a success story.

Alia is featured along with John Divola and Chris Boot in this video that was made at the Darmstadt Tage der Fotografie, where she won the Merck Prize last year. She speaks about her process and her work.

Statement for Southland: These images are from a current series of work, Southland, that I began in 2009. They mark my continued interest in making photographs that explore the environment and our ambiguous relationship to it. On the one hand, these images are invested in a specific sense of place: the Los Angeles landscape of currently dis-used spaces. These discarded sites have historically been considered civically or culturally valuable. Considering the cyclical nature of time and renewal, they will, at some point in the future, once again regain a useful vitality of some sort. Currently, however, they lie fallow.

The generic, lack of specificity of these “in-between” sites is equally compelling in the larger conversation; they donʼt necessarily read as Los Angeles, or California, or even America. They could be anywhere. Which they may as well be; these remnant land-tracts are everywhere. At one end of the spectrum, these images exemplify a classic example of natureʼs grandeur and benign beauty. In counterpoint to this benevolence lies a darker undercurrent. The relationship between the two is charged, hard to pin down. Ultimately though, they are two sides to the same coin. This interests me. I consider these photos revisionist landscapes. They exist in the space between traditional, historical landscape painting and vehemently realist photographs—they are documents of our time, showing us what this place look liked one a certain day at a certain time. I donʼt set out with a specific agenda to address a specific issue when I walk out into the landscape with my camera. I just go and I look, and then report back.

Congratulations on receiving First Place in the Dealer’s Choice Award through Center and for the recent feature in Unless You Will, Issue 14. Let’s back up to find out how you got started in photography.

Thanks so much. I went to undergrad film school at USC, and half-way through I realized I was trying to tell stories at 24 frames-per-second, but had no idea how a single frame was created, so I took an intro photo class. I got an F in the photo chemistry unit, but loved the rest of it. I ended up taking three classes total, which was the extent of my formal photo education until I started graduate school in 2007. In the 13 years in between, I photographed editorial & commercial work, but my heart wasn’t ultimately in it. I didn’t want to become a commercial photographer with “personal work” on the side. To that end, I applied to grad school to force myself to work on my own projects, and learn to think critically about those projects. I finished my MFA last summer, in 2010.

What camera do you work with, and what draws you to the imagery you produce?

I started shooting with an 8×10 Deardorff in 2001, and continued with that until grad school, where I needed to be producing more work on a weekly basis. Also, I work alone and often in fairly sketchy areas where it’s not always good to be a woman trapped under a dark cloth, and had experienced a close-call while working with the 8×10 up in the Angeles Crest area. I realized I needed to be able to work and move faster through the landscape, so in 2009 I traded down for a Grand View 4×5. But then they stopped making the Fuji Ready-Load film that I liked, and I lost access to the drum scanner at school when I finished the MFA, so I transitioned to digital last year. I’m currently working with an old Contax 645 camera, with a Phase One P30+ digital back. I used to shoot editorial with that camera using a film back, and now it’s just got a digital back on it. I love it. I buy all my gear used, which makes a rig like that financially possible.

It’s hard to say what draws me to certain imagery. It’s very intuitive, and probably more than anything has to do with a sense of place. My photography is very much about driving around until I see something that looks interesting. Sometimes I drive past places for months before I ever stop and get out with the camera. Sometimes it’s as great as I had hoped it would be, sometimes it’s a total bust.

Were you influenced by a particular artist or photographer?

My influences are pretty broad, and are by no means limited to photography. I love the way the Western landscape is portrayed in the early survey work of Carleton Watkins and Timothy O’Sullivan, and by New Topographics guys too, in particular Robert Adams and Lewis Baltz. I studied with John Divola, and he has influenced the way I think about my work for sure. But I also love the way artists like Robert Smithson and Richard Long address issues surrounding landscape in their work. Filmmakers like John Ford, Wim Wenders, and Andrei Tarkovsky have made a huge impact on me in terms of how they approach storytelling and place. Classic landscape painters like Corot, Constable, and Van Ruisdael also factor in there, especially when I’m printing. But then, I’m also a massive Brian Eno fan. So my interests are sort of all over the place.

Do you prefer to shoot locally, or would you like to make work somewhere else in the world?

Right now I’m fairly invested in California, as I have a couple of new, local projects that I’m working on. But I love to travel and will undoubtedly work farther afield in the future. I am dying to go to Alaska. And Antarctica. I have no idea why I like to go to cold places where camera batteries die quick and brutal deaths.

You have had a number of successes lately. How do you go about selecting what to submit to and any thoughts of competitions and awards?

I submit to competitions based on who the jurors are mostly. Dianne Vanderlip was the sole juror for the Center Dealer’s Choice award. She wrote a fantastic statement that’s posted on the Center site about the experience and her decision-making process that anyone who enters competitions should read. In a larger context though, the competitions/awards thing gets complicated. A film director I once worked with said that awards are meaningless…until you win one. Which I think sums it up.

Are you active in social media and has it changed how you promote your work?

I’m on Facebook but I’m not an active social networker otherwise. I’ll post announcements and invites to exhibitions on Facebook, and it is great for that, and connecting with and keeping in touch with my art world friends. But I’m just as likely to post horse pictures to share with my horse world buddies. It’s kind of a problem, really.

Have you attended portfolio reviews?

I have not.

What advice would you give other emerging photographers?

I saw Matthew Weiner, the creator of Mad Men, on a panel discussion last year and he said something really smart: choose your critics wisely. He said, don’t just let anyone read your scripts. Because misguided or stupid feedback can be so devastating. Especially when you’re just getting started. So I have a couple of trusted confidants that I show work in progress too, but that’s it. Ultimately though, I just try to stick to my instincts and keep working, working, working.

And finally, describe your perfect day.

Getting up to go ride horses in the morning, then shooting all afternoon. I actually had one of these days recently. I’m sure I looked like a goofball in my riding gear with my camera, but who cares. It was the best.