Tag Archives: Childhood Memories

Playpen by Roger Ballen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Room of the Ninja Turtles, 2003, © Roger Ballen

Exhibition on view:
March 22–May 11, 2012

North-West University Gallery
Potchefstroom Campus
548 West 28 St
018 299 4341

Playpen by Roger Ballen is a compilation of over thirty years of documentation of children, the environments they inhabit, their toys, and drawings. These images, a new body of work, Asylum, and an installation constructed specifically for the gallery will be exhibited at North-West University. Ballen’s Playpen explores photography as an art form as it takes on painterly yet sculptural roles and interacts with the viewers own childhood memories and adolescent dreams.

Children’s faces hidden by masks and crude wall drawings eerily linger throughout the black and white images by the South African photographer.

Ballen is featured in Aperture issues 201 and 173. His work also appears in The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture, 2011).

Frank Yamrus

Tonight at the ClampArt Gallery in New York, Frank Yamrus will open a solo exhibition of I Feel Lucky, which runs through March 24th, 2012. As someone who just celebrated another, sigh, birthday, I felt a connection to the idea of taking stock of oneself and was especially interested in understanding a male point of view on the subject. This self-portrait series was originally inspired by Frank’s forward motion into middle age, as he “stared down the barrel of his 50th birthday”. He wanted to explore his changing body image, looking at the ravages of age and time through skin and mass, but instead he became interested in examining his inner self. The project spans from childhood memories to current life, a visual journey that resulted in an appreciation of the person he has become, and for life itself.

Frank has exhibited work internationally over the past twenty years, and his photographs are held in many public collections. He has produced a book of this series, with essays by W.M.-Bill-Hunt and Sunil Gupta.

Images from I Feel Lucky

untitled (Cake)

untitled (Daybreak)

untitled (Sandman)

untitled (Brooke)

untitled (Stone)

untitled (Cemetary)

untitled (Float)

untitled (Nap)

untitled (Box)

untitled (Jerk)

untitled (Window)

untitled (Cross)

untitled (Kiss)

untitled (Smoke)

Alex Webb Opens Last Week-Join Saturday for an Exhibition Tour

Last Thursday night, Aperture Gallery hosted an Opening Reception to celebrate Alex Webb‘s exhibition The Suffering of Light. Corresponding to the monograph of the same name, The Suffering of Light is a comprehensive look at over 30 years of Webb’s vibrant color photographs. Taken in international locales from India to Haiti, Webb’s photographs bridge the gap between street photography, photojournalism and fine art photography genres. The exhibition will be on view at Aperture Gallery through January 19, 2012.

Alex Webb will give a walkthrough of the exhibition this Saturday, December 17, from 4:00 – 5:00 pm at Aperture Gallery. The tour is FREE and open to the public.

In the Gallery Bookstore, Aperture is also presenting work by David Favrod, winner of our 2010 Portfolio Prize. in his first New York solo show. In his series Gaijin—which means foreign or alien—Favrod imagines his own personal Japan within Switzerland, playing on visual clichés of Japanese culture and recreating scenes from his childhood memories of Japan.

Photographer Alex Webb with Rebecca Norris Webb

Alex Webb signs his monograph The Suffering of Light.

Aperture’s Executive Director Chris Boot on right

A guest reads a copy of The Photobook Review, Aperture Foundation’s brand new bi-annual publication. Stop by the bookstore to pick up your copy before they run out! Stay tuned to find out when the digital version becomes available.

 

Photographer #367: Catherine Larré

Catherine Larré, 1964, France, is a fine art photographer who studied at the Royal College of Art in London. She uses unique lighting techniques to achieve her dream-like images that often take us back to our childhood memories. With bold choices she mostly frames her subjects in odd ways and awkward positions making the viewer wonder and reflect on what he/she is looking at. The photographs of Larré contain a certain serenity. They are mysterious, silent and fragile moments in time. This is also visible in her landscape and animal photography that tend to become supernatural reflections of a thought-out reality. The following images come from three untitled series within her portfolio.

Website: www.catherinelarre.com

Photographer #367: Catherine Larré

Catherine Larré, 1964, France, is a fine art photographer who studied at the Royal College of Art in London. She uses unique lighting techniques to achieve her dream-like images that often take us back to our childhood memories. With bold choices she mostly frames her subjects in odd ways and awkward positions making the viewer wonder and reflect on what he/she is looking at. The photographs of Larré contain a certain serenity. They are mysterious, silent and fragile moments in time. This is also visible in her landscape and animal photography that tend to become supernatural reflections of a thought-out reality. The following images come from three untitled series within her portfolio.

Website: www.catherinelarre.com

Kids Are People Too…

The Panopticon Gallery in Boston is presenting a new exhibition, Kids Are People Too, opening June 8, 2011 and running through until July 12, 2011. Kids Are People Too celebrates the work of sixteen photographers and their images of children, from the well known to the emerging contemporary artist.

Gallerist and curator, Jason Landry, remembers his own childhood, “When I was a boy there was a TV show called, Kids Are People Too. It was like a talk show for kids: a Sunday morning variety show. My fondest memory of that show was the time that they had my favorite rock band on, KISS. Isn’t it interesting that some childhood memories are quite vivid, while others are long forgotten?”

Well, I just happened to find a you tube of that episode…perhaps some memories are best staying just that, as memories…

Photographers include Hiroshi Watanabe, Harold Feinstein, Suzanne Revy, Aaron Siskind, Aline Smithson, Wynn Bullock, Ernest C. Withers, Shelby Lee Adams, Constantine Manos, Abelardo Morell, Kirsty O’Keeffe, Amy Stein, Jock Sturges, Keiko Hiromi, Wendy Sacks, and Azita Panahpour.

© Hiroshi Watanabe. Above: Marina Ema & Kazusa Ito, Matsuo Kabuki, 2003. 10×10 inch gelatin silver print.

© Harold Feinstein. Boy Writing Numbers in Chalk, 1955. Gelatin silver print.

© Jock Sturges. Misty Dawn, Northern California, 1992. gelatin silver print.
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© Suzanne Revy. Stretched, 2008. Gelatin silver print.

© Ernest Withers. Twins at WDIA, 1948. Gelatin silver print.

© Aline Smithson. Quincy, 2010. Archival pigment print.

© Shelby Lee Adams. Tyler & Sheba, 2001. Gelatin silver print.

© Wynn Bullock. Child in Forest, 1951/2011. Archival pigment print.

© Kirsty O’Keeffe. Narcissus, 2010. Archival pigment print.

Photo Stroll – A Night Out in The Black Country with Brian Griffin

© Brian Griffin, Woman Chainmaker, 2010. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist.

From the press release: “Brian Griffin was born in Birmingham in 1948 but spent his childhood in Lye, in the Black Country before departing for Manchester College of Art in 1969 to study photography. He has since gone on to become one of the UK’s most established photographers and is renowned for his portraits of musicians, actors, political figures and the business community. However, growing up in the 50s and 60s in the Black Country, surrounded by industry, has left an indelible impression on the artist, to such an extent, that a new body of work recalls his childhood memories of living amongst the factories on Stocking Street, Lye.

“Inspired by a range of artistic influences including Caravaggio, Sir Stanley Spencer, Otto Dix and religious art, Griffin’s theatrical compositions place his life story on centre stage.

“The Black Country was first exhibited at Collège des Bernardins, Paris. The exhibition has been supported by the Owen Family Trust, Walsall Museums and Galleries Development Trust, Multistory and Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council.”

© Brian Griffin, Tim Newey. Courtesy of the artist.

Today’s post which is also up at the New York Photo Festival 2011 site comes a little later than anticipated as someone cut through my broadband cable and I was disconnected from cyberland. Now back online, here’s a photo stroll from yesterday’s night out to Brian Griffin’s private view of his most personal project to date, The Black Country, which opened today at the New Art Gallery Walsall and runs until 19 June.

Landlord of The Old Swan pub Tim Newey, pictured above, provided a barrel of beer from his brewery and was among the guests at the busy opening. Here’s hoping that the show makes its way across the Atlantic so that others can enjoy Griffin’s exhibition too. For now, here’s a photo stroll taster of what to expect. And, after my last wordy post, today I’ve decided to step back and let the images speak for themselves. To see more…

All photo stroll images © Miranda Gavin, 2011.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Shows Tagged: Brian Griffin, New Art Gallery Walsall, photo exhibition, photo show, The Black Country, Walsall