Tag Archives: Celebrated Photographers

Photography Open Salon Arles: An Eye for An Ear

Recently, Les Recontres d’Arles celebrated photographers and photography from around the world with a two week festival in the south of France.  One of the biggest draws was Photography Open Salon’s An Eye For An Ear, curated by Vanja Karas.  Set in the Galerie Huit, this exhibition continues until September 23rd, with an estimated viewership of close to 100,000. Many thanks to Eran Gilat for his assistance with this post.

 An Eye for an Ear, curated by Vanja Karas

Photography
Open Salon is designed to showcase cutting-edge contemporary and
emerging photography from around the world and enable talented artists
to exhibit and have exposure during and alongside one of the oldest and
most renowned International photography festivals: Les Rencontres
d’Arles, which has been running for 43 years. 


Photography Open Salon Arles 2012 showcases a selection of 250
images by over 100 photographers from 34 countries. A selection of this
year’s winning images will also be showcased in South-East Asia in early
2013. The work was selected from a wide range of responses and
interpretations  submitted by artists from 83 countries. 
   


Selected images from An Eye for An Ear
Anne-Marie Atkinson
 Eran Gilat

 Amro Hamzawi

 Young-Hee Kim

 Sara Naim
 Alex and Felix

 Jocelyn Allen

 Aline Smithson

 Tariq Dajani

 Emer Gillespie
 Edward Hopley

 Jane Koh

 Julia Lindemalm

 Ellen Nolan

 Maria Paschalidou
 Barbra Riley
 Laura Stevens

Pina Bausch, Kontakthof, POSTHUMOUS  by Vanja Karas

This
body of work explores the neo-expressoinist non-verbal narrative of
movement and dance. These images are part of a series taken during the
performance created by the legendary German choreographer Pina Bausch
performed by her theatre group Tanztheater Wuppertal,  after her death,
at the Barbican Theatre in London. Pina’s striking theatricality
included sado-masochism, intentionally bad ballet, lots of evening
gowns, high heels, lipstick-adorned women and barefoot men in suits. The
series, however, is not only about the aesthetics of Pina Bausch’s
neo-expressionist choreography and movement:  it also explores the
comfort and discomfort of solitude and the interplay between the
voluntary and involuntary basis on which we collect, cultivate, recall
and process our memories. Dealing with the historical narrative through
symbolism, allegory and myth, the dramatic physical idiosyncrasy is
created by the performers, all over 65, chosen from the generation that
carries pre-Berlin Wall memories and experiences. Some live and long for
the past, some escape into their fantasies, others don’t want to
remember…  
Vanja Karas © Pina Bausch 

Vanja Karas © Pina Bausch 

Delpire & Co. Opens @ Aperture, Throughout NYC

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Aperture Gallery was abuzz Wednesday evening, hosting the much-anticipated New York City launch of Delpire & Co., the citywide, multi-venue retrospective of the life and work of legendary editor, curator and publisher, Robert Delpire. Following presentations in Arles and Paris, Delpire & Co. arrives to New York City with representation at six venues throughout Manhattan.

Aperture’s Wednesday opening was the first of the week (followed by Thursday night openings at the French Embassy, and Gallery at Hermes), welcoming a strong roster of photography legends and pillars of the photographic community. Sarah Moon, Mary Ellen Mark, and Josef Koudelka were in attendance, standing alongside their own seminal works on view, as well as celebrated photographers Bruce Davidson and Susan Meiselas. Multiple films by filmmaker/photographer Sarah Moon were on screen, including 1970’s TV spots directed by Moon for Cacharel (7 min), as well as “Le Montreur d’images (The Go-Between)” (2009), her feature length documentary on husband Robert Delpire.



Peter Barberie
, Curator of Photographs for the Philadelphia Art Museum was in attendance Wednesday evening, as well as Jeff Hirsch of FotoCare, and Wendy Byrne, former designer for Aperture Foundation. Special thanks to exhibition producer Mike Derez, and Project Coordinator Agnès Gagnès of Idéodis.

Delpire & Co. runs through June at venues throughout the city. Like us on Facebook to view a full album of photos from the opening.

›› Click here for details on all the exhibitions and events.
›› Join the conversation on Instagram and Twitter using #Delpire
›› The New Yorker presents a stunning and concise slideshow summary of books and photographs from among the displays at Aperture, Hermès, Pace/MacGill, and Howard Greenberg.

Pete Brook and Prison Photography

Pete Brook is not a photographer. He’s an intelligent voice in the blog and magazine sphere, who writes a thoughtful photography blog, Prison Photography, exploring incarceration and prison reform around the world. He also writes about photography for Wired Magazine’s Raw File, and recently interviewed Elizabeth Avedon for his new interview column “Raw Meet.

Image by Victor Blue

I consider Pete a friend–we connected awhile back through our blogs and I want very much to support him in his efforts to dig deeper into the cause and result of a life behind bars. “We must stop warehousing people and be creative with rehabilitation. Prisons in the US are socially and economically unsustainable. As they exist, prisons are a liability … and they are ignored. Problems also exist in other countries.” Pete makes us look at the closed-off corners of our world that we’d prefer to ignore or not address, and he is relentless in his passion for this subject.

He has created a Kickstarter campaign: Prison Photography-on-the-road-stories behind the photographs, so he can hit the highway, connect with photographers who are looking at prisoners and prisons, conduct some interviews, and bring attention to this subject. Please consider supporting him in this venture.

Prison Photography’ on the Road is a journalism project. I will conduct over 40 audio interviews, publish them online and make them available to the prison reform and photography communities free of charge via Creative Commons licensing. My writing during the trip will also be CC licensed. I’m doing the legwork so others can enjoy the ride and use the results.

Image by Lori Waselchuk

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about photography. I’ll be meeting the most creative and celebrated photographers who, through their work in prisons, have shaped America’s visual culture and the debate on U.S. criminal justice.



Interviewees include:

Jenn Ackerman, award winning photographer for Trapped

Adam Amengual, commercial and documentary photographer

Victor Blue, seasoned photojournalist specialising in social and political story telling

Lloyd Degrane, commercial and documentary prisons, known for his series Prison

Amy Elkins, fine art photographer working on collaborative project with death row prisoners

Harvey Finkle, social documentary photographer

Tim Gruber, fine art and documentary photographer known for his series Served Out

Bruce Jackson, photographer and SUNY James Agee Professor of American Culture

Lou Jones, known for his death row portraits

Brenda Ann Kenneally, documentary photographer who focuses on women families and marginalised communities

Sean Kernan, documentary photographer of the series In Prison

Jon Lowenstein, NOOR member and award winning photojournalist

Deborah Luster, fine art photographer

Danny Lyon, pioneering documentary photographer

Frank McMains, photographer of multiple prison stories in Louisiana

Ara Oshagan, award winning documentary photographer known for Juvies

Mona Reeder, Dallas Morning News photojournalist, Robert F. Kennedy Award and Hillman Prize for Photojournalism winner

Joseph Rodriguez, documentary photographer, social activist, ICP instructor

Richard Ross, Guggenheim recipient and photographer

Jamel Shabazz, photographer, teacher, retired prison guard

Adam Shemper, psychotherapist and photographer

Jan Sturmann, documentary photographer

Stephen Tourlentes, professor and fine art photographer

Lori Waselchuk, documentary photographer

Max Whittaker, photojournalist and Prime Collective founder

Sye Williams,commercial photographer and gadfly

Taro Yamasaki, Pulitzer prize winner for photojournalism

Image by Steve Davis

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about prisons. I’ll be meeting some of the leading thinkers in prison arts, prison education, law and advocacy. Including, Rebecca Ginsburg of the Educational Justice Project, representatives of the Southern Poverty Law Center, folk at The Innocence Project and those working with juveniles and for re-entry programmes. I hope desperately to talk to Department of Corrections officials in some of the larger States.

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about education. I’ll deliver the lecture ‘American Prisons: Photography in the Era of Mass Incarceration’ to half a dozen colleges. Through the people I meet on the road, I hope to access prisons and jails to deliver the same material.

Image by Adam Amenguel

WHY?

U.S. prisons are under incredible pressures from all sides. Politicians have continually used tough on crime rhetoric to win votes, but longer sentences and the correctional philosophy of “incapacitation” has bloated prisons and not reduced rates of recidivism (which in the U.S. are higher than those of other countries). Prison education budgets have been slashed and felon disenfranchisement laws often place a released prisoner in a worse position to succeed than when they went in. Some public are fearful, some are in the dark, but either way their tax dollars are at work to continue inefficient practices.

The U.S. prison population has quadrupled in the past 35 years.

Today, 1 in every 100 U.S. adults is imprisoned.

At 2.3 million individuals incarcerated, the U.S. imprisons people at a rate six times that of the next most punitive Western nation, the United Kingdom

Women have suffered proportionally the most, with a near eight-fold increase in U.S. the number of U.S. female prisoners in the past 35 years.

The U.S. prison system disproportionately punishes poor people and minority groups.

Only the current economic crisis has brought about serious scrutiny of prison spending. Moves toward more sensible and effective non-custodial sentences as well as early release for non-violent or geriatric prisoners are steps in the right direction.

Now is a good moment to take stock, think about our culture and how it’s policies may move toward social justice imperatives.



Image by Jenn Ackerman

WHERE?

San Francisco, Oakland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Minneapolis, Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Rochester, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Charlottesville, Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery, Jackson, New Orleans, Houston, Austin, Dallas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Flagstaff, Phoenix, Los Angeles … and places in between.



Image by Sean Kernan

YOUR DONATION

Funds will be used to buy gas for 8,000 miles (I’ve got a small car with good MPG) and food for 12 weeks (I am not a picky eater, nor do I have expensive tastes!), an audio recorder (I already have the microphone), three oil changes and a few road tolls.

Between now and the new year, I’ll be working diligently to connect with non-profit organisations who can benefit from using the material created. The project may last 12 weeks, but the long-tail of content will be used in perpetuity.

Pete Brook and Prison Photography

Pete Brook is not a photographer. He’s an intelligent voice in the blog and magazine sphere, who writes a thoughtful photography blog, Prison Photography, exploring incarceration and prison reform around the world. He also writes about photography for Wired Magazine’s Raw File, and recently interviewed Elizabeth Avedon for his new interview column “Raw Meet.

Image by Victor Blue

I consider Pete a friend–we connected awhile back through our blogs and I want very much to support him in his efforts to dig deeper into the cause and result of a life behind bars. “We must stop warehousing people and be creative with rehabilitation. Prisons in the US are socially and economically unsustainable. As they exist, prisons are a liability … and they are ignored. Problems also exist in other countries.” Pete makes us look at the closed-off corners of our world that we’d prefer to ignore or not address, and he is relentless in his passion for this subject.

He has created a Kickstarter campaign: Prison Photography-on-the-road-stories behind the photographs, so he can hit the highway, connect with photographers who are looking at prisoners and prisons, conduct some interviews, and bring attention to this subject. Please consider supporting him in this venture.

Prison Photography’ on the Road is a journalism project. I will conduct over 40 audio interviews, publish them online and make them available to the prison reform and photography communities free of charge via Creative Commons licensing. My writing during the trip will also be CC licensed. I’m doing the legwork so others can enjoy the ride and use the results.

Image by Lori Waselchuk

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about photography. I’ll be meeting the most creative and celebrated photographers who, through their work in prisons, have shaped America’s visual culture and the debate on U.S. criminal justice.



Interviewees include:

Jenn Ackerman, award winning photographer for Trapped

Adam Amengual, commercial and documentary photographer

Victor Blue, seasoned photojournalist specialising in social and political story telling

Lloyd Degrane, commercial and documentary prisons, known for his series Prison

Amy Elkins, fine art photographer working on collaborative project with death row prisoners

Harvey Finkle, social documentary photographer

Tim Gruber, fine art and documentary photographer known for his series Served Out

Bruce Jackson, photographer and SUNY James Agee Professor of American Culture

Lou Jones, known for his death row portraits

Brenda Ann Kenneally, documentary photographer who focuses on women families and marginalised communities

Sean Kernan, documentary photographer of the series In Prison

Jon Lowenstein, NOOR member and award winning photojournalist

Deborah Luster, fine art photographer

Danny Lyon, pioneering documentary photographer

Frank McMains, photographer of multiple prison stories in Louisiana

Ara Oshagan, award winning documentary photographer known for Juvies

Mona Reeder, Dallas Morning News photojournalist, Robert F. Kennedy Award and Hillman Prize for Photojournalism winner

Joseph Rodriguez, documentary photographer, social activist, ICP instructor

Richard Ross, Guggenheim recipient and photographer

Jamel Shabazz, photographer, teacher, retired prison guard

Adam Shemper, psychotherapist and photographer

Jan Sturmann, documentary photographer

Stephen Tourlentes, professor and fine art photographer

Lori Waselchuk, documentary photographer

Max Whittaker, photojournalist and Prime Collective founder

Sye Williams,commercial photographer and gadfly

Taro Yamasaki, Pulitzer prize winner for photojournalism

Image by Steve Davis

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about prisons. I’ll be meeting some of the leading thinkers in prison arts, prison education, law and advocacy. Including, Rebecca Ginsburg of the Educational Justice Project, representatives of the Southern Poverty Law Center, folk at The Innocence Project and those working with juveniles and for re-entry programmes. I hope desperately to talk to Department of Corrections officials in some of the larger States.

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about education. I’ll deliver the lecture ‘American Prisons: Photography in the Era of Mass Incarceration’ to half a dozen colleges. Through the people I meet on the road, I hope to access prisons and jails to deliver the same material.

Image by Adam Amenguel

WHY?

U.S. prisons are under incredible pressures from all sides. Politicians have continually used tough on crime rhetoric to win votes, but longer sentences and the correctional philosophy of “incapacitation” has bloated prisons and not reduced rates of recidivism (which in the U.S. are higher than those of other countries). Prison education budgets have been slashed and felon disenfranchisement laws often place a released prisoner in a worse position to succeed than when they went in. Some public are fearful, some are in the dark, but either way their tax dollars are at work to continue inefficient practices.

The U.S. prison population has quadrupled in the past 35 years.

Today, 1 in every 100 U.S. adults is imprisoned.

At 2.3 million individuals incarcerated, the U.S. imprisons people at a rate six times that of the next most punitive Western nation, the United Kingdom

Women have suffered proportionally the most, with a near eight-fold increase in U.S. the number of U.S. female prisoners in the past 35 years.

The U.S. prison system disproportionately punishes poor people and minority groups.

Only the current economic crisis has brought about serious scrutiny of prison spending. Moves toward more sensible and effective non-custodial sentences as well as early release for non-violent or geriatric prisoners are steps in the right direction.

Now is a good moment to take stock, think about our culture and how it’s policies may move toward social justice imperatives.



Image by Jenn Ackerman

WHERE?

San Francisco, Oakland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Minneapolis, Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Rochester, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Charlottesville, Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery, Jackson, New Orleans, Houston, Austin, Dallas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Flagstaff, Phoenix, Los Angeles … and places in between.



Image by Sean Kernan

YOUR DONATION

Funds will be used to buy gas for 8,000 miles (I’ve got a small car with good MPG) and food for 12 weeks (I am not a picky eater, nor do I have expensive tastes!), an audio recorder (I already have the microphone), three oil changes and a few road tolls.

Between now and the new year, I’ll be working diligently to connect with non-profit organisations who can benefit from using the material created. The project may last 12 weeks, but the long-tail of content will be used in perpetuity.

Pieter Hugo directs Spoek Mathambo in cover of Joy Division’s She’s Lost Control

I love images and music. I always have and I always will. So here’s a music video for today’s post.

I was a huge fan of Joy Division, so I was intrigued by this version of one of their songs by Spoek Mathambo, with photographer Pieter Hugo (The Hyena and Other Men and Nollywood) directing. It re-works this song so so well.

From Spoek Mathambo website: “Control, fifth video from Spoek Mathambo’s debut album Mshini Wam, is a darkwave township house cover of the Joy Division classic She’s Lost Control.

“For the music video, Spoek has collaborated with one of South Africa’s most celebrated photographers, Pieter Hugo &cinematographer Michael Cleary. It explores the world of township cults, street preaches and teen gangs and was shot on location in a squatted train boarding house in Langa, Cape Town. The cast is mainly made up of the neighborhood kids who run their own dance troop, Happy Feet.”

However,  you can follow this link if you want to hear and see Joy Division performing She’s Lost Control.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Books, Photography Promotion, short films Tagged: Ian Curtis, Joy Division, Pieter Hugo, She’s Lost Control, Spoek Mathambo