Tag Archives: Carnegie Museum

Register today: Lens Culture FotoFest Paris Portfolio Reviews

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Photographers:

Are you ready for success in the international marketplace?

Registration is now open for Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2012, the 3rd annual international photography portfolio reviews in Paris on November 12-14, 2012.

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The event will bring together more than 50 influential photography experts and 150 photographers from five continents. Last year, 163 photographers from 36 countries participated — making it a truly international cultural exchange — with many, many success stories resulting from the meetings.

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The three day program — November 12-14, 2012 — is organized by Lens Culture (Paris) and FotoFest International (Houston), in cooperation with Paris Photo, the leading international fine art photography fair, which takes place November 15-18. The portfolio review will again be hosted at Spéos Paris Photographic Institute, 8, rue Jules Vallès, 75011 Paris.

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The goal of Lens Culture FotoFest Paris is to bring together serious, mid-career photographers and leading decision-makers in the field of creative photography – curators, publishers, gallery owners, festival directors, agency representatives, and art directors – who can aid the development and careers of the photographers by introducing their work throughout the world.

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Reviewers will be attending from many important organizations including The New York Times, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Carnegie Museum of Art (US), Maison Européene de la Photographie (France), Stern magazine (Germany), Seoul Photo Fair (Korea), Ballarat International Foto Biennale (Australia), George Eastman House (US), Museet for Fotokunst (Denmark), Schilt Publishing (Netherlands), Alt. + 1000 Festival de photographie (Switzerland), Anthropographia (Montreal, Canada), Encuentros Abiertos de Fotografia (Argentina), Jackson Fine Art (US), among many others.

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Julien Frydman, director of Paris Photo, is enthusiastic about Lens Culture FotoFest Paris:

“Each year, Paris Photo introduces important collectors to top galleries and photographers from around the world. In a similar way, the Lens Culture FotoFest annual portfolio reviews in Paris help connect emerging photographers with galleries, curators, publishers and other art world professionals who are always seeking new talent. Lens Culture FotoFest Paris is a perfect complement to Paris Photo, and we are proud to be partners in this important global cultural event since its inception in 2010.”

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Participating photographers have the opportunity to get editorial assignments, book publication contracts, art gallery representation, and feature articles in magazines, online and in print. In turn, the expert reviewers hope to discover new talent as well as the latest work of photographers who are already established.

See the full details — and register to participate — at www.fotofest-paris.com.

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This November, Paris will offer an extra special bonus for photography lovers. In addition to Paris Photo, and FotoFest Paris, the city-wide Month of Photography will feature more than 100 other exhibitions and special photography events at locations all over Paris.

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As in the previous two years, we expect registration to sell-out well in advance, so don’t miss your chance. Book your ticket today!

Scott Conarroe, BMW

Scott Conarroe, BMW

Scott Conarroe

BMW,
Point Bridget, Alaska, 2010
From the By Land, By Sea series
Website – ScottConarroe.com

Scott Conarroe (b. 1974) has a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art and Design and an MFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. He has been artist-in-residence at Light Work (US), FLACC (BE), and Villa Strauli (CH), and a Canadian Armed Forces Civilian Artist in the Arctic. Scott was included among PDN's 30 in 2010 and awarded the 2011 Duke and Duchess of York Prize for Photography. His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Bank of Montreal. Scott is sessional faculty at ECUAD and represented by the Stephen Bulger Gallery. He is based out of Keremeos, British Columbia and Toronto.
 

Sarah Malakoff

Sarah Malakoff’s photographs explore the idea of home, but I am drawn to the formal study of spaces that are more than just rooms, they are rooms with elements of quirky expression, each with a surprise twist.  I have to admit it, I’d like to hang out in these homes and meet the people who created these spaces.  The lack of human evidence makes the work feel like a movie set, ready for the drama to unfold. Sarah was awarded a spot in the 2009 Critical Mass top 50 portfolios with the project, Living Arrangements, and also exhibited it at the Griffin Museum of Photography.

Sarah lives and works in Boston,
Massachusetts and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  She received her Master of Fine Arts
from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.  She has had numerous solo
exhibitions including the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, the Griffin Museum
of Photography in Winchester, MA, Howard Yezerski Gallery in Boston, MA and
Plane Space in New York, NY.  Her
photographs have recently been shown at the Carnegie Museum of Art in
Pittsburgh, The DeCordova Museum, The Portland Museum of Art, The Danforth
Museum of Art, The Smith College Museum of Art, The Photographic Resource
Center, and Photo Center Northwest.
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: My
photographs are examinations of the home as both a refuge from and at times a
re-creation of the outside world. 
In my images, architecture and furnishings appear as uncanny symbols of
culture, family, and nature.  With
the intentional exclusion of human occupants, my subjects spark curious
speculation of their own.  The
private and personal are expressed in part by objects and signifiers which are displayed
versus those which are hidden; what is allowed inside, and what is kept
out.  For example, doors and
windows both frame exterior views and keep the elements at bay.  Land, weather, and wildlife are ever
present on the other side of the wall even as they are brought safely inside in
the form of pattern, simulation, and domesticated animals.  Ironically, both indoors and out
equally project artifice.
    
These pictures speak to notions of comfort, class, and style as well as universal attempts to control and transcend our environment. Tensions, and often humor, appear between absence and presence, old and new, real and surreal, permanent and transient, genuine and artificial, the domestic and the natural worlds. The desire to resolve these tensions drives the viewer to create their own narrative and imagine possible inhabitants.

One Shot Teenie: A Retrospective of Charles Harris

Charles "Teenie" Harris

Photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris holding a camera while standing on the sidewalk.

Watch many photographers today working on digital SLRs and you’ll see them shoot, pull the camera down to peek in the digital screen to check the image, then repeat. This action has become known as chimping, and old salts will say that it betrays the photographer as an amateur, because back in the days of film, once you took a photo, that was what you had.

But in the days of film, especially in a controlled setting, photographers often made redundant shots to make sure they captured what they wanted. Not Charles “Teenie” Harris. A native of Pittsburgh’s Hill District, the city’s cultural center of African-American life, Harris was a semi-pro athlete and a numbers runner before he bought his first camera in the 1930s. He opened a photography studio and specialized in glamour portraits, earning the nickname “One Shot” because he rarely made his subjects sit for a second take. Nearly 80 years later, a retrospective of the photographer’s work is on view at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

“One Shot” Harris freelanced for the Pittsburgh Courier, chronicling the life of black neighborhoods throughout the city. In 1953, he closed his portrait studio, and for the next 20 years, he captured the late Jim Crow and Civil Rights eras, photographing Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, Muhammad Ali, John F. Kennedy, Dwight Eisenhower and dozens of others who shaped the late 20th century. But Harris is most remembered for his images of daily life—urban landscapes, social gatherings, musical performances and sports from boxing to Negro League baseball. He captured the vibrant times and slow death of the Crawford Grill, perhaps the most famous jazz club in the Hill District.

Harris made more than 80,000 images in his career, nearly 60,000 of which have been scanned and catalogued by the Carnegie Museum of Art. The Museum maintains a searchable archive online and a retrospective exhibition of Harris’ work will run until April 7, allowing visitors to see an era and a place captured one single shot at a time.

Teenie Harris, Photographer is on view at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh through April 7.

Sarah Malakoff, Untitled Interior (blizzard)

Sarah Malakoff, Untitled Interior (blizzard)

Sarah Malakoff

Untitled Interior (blizzard),
Roslindale, Massachusetts, 2005
From the Living Arrangements series
Website – SarahMalakoff.com

Sarah Malakoff is a photographer who lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She received her Master of Fine Arts from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. Her photographs are examinations of the home as both a refuge from and at times a re-creation of the outside world. She has had solo exhibitions at the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, Howard Yezerski Gallery in Boston, MA and Plane Space in New York, NY. Her photographs have also recently been shown at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, The DeCordova Museum, The Portland Museum of Art, The Danforth Museum of Art, The Smith College Museum of Art, The Photographic Resource Center, and Photo Center Northwest.

Meet 52 international photography experts in Paris November 7-8-9, 2011

Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2011, the second annual international photography portfolio review in Paris, is bringing together 52 photography experts from 16 countries to meet one-on-one for three days with serious mid-career photographers. So far, more than 150 photographers from 36 countries have registered to participate in this truly diverse, multicultural exchange.

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This event is a partnership between Lens Culture, Fotofest International, Spéos Paris Photographic Institute and Paris Photo.

Julien Frydman, director of Paris Photo, announced:

“Each year, Paris Photo introduces important collectors to the most interesting galleries and photographers from around the world. In a similar way, the Lens Culture FotoFest annual portfolio reviews in Paris help to connect emerging photographers with galleries, curators, publishers and other artworld professionals who are always seeking new talent. Lens Culture FotoFest Paris is a perfect complement to Paris Photo, and we are proud to be partners in this important global cultural event since its inception in 2010.”

This list of international photography experts who will participate is quite impressive:

Soraya Amrane / Lucille Lagier (Marseille, France)
Atelier de Visu

Daphné Anglès (Paris, France)
European Picture Coordinator, The New York Times

Fred Baldwin (Houston, Texas, USA)
Chairman, Co-Founder, FotoFest

Pavel Banka (Prague, Czech Republic)
Chief Editor, Co-founder, FOTOGRAF magazine

Alexa Becker (Heidelberg, Germany)
Acquisitions Editor, Kehrer Verlag Publishers

Nathalie Belayche (Paris, France)
Curatorial Assistant, Baudoin Lebon Gallery

Linda Benedict-Jones (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA)
Curator of Photography, Carnegie Museum of Art

Evgeny Berezner (Moscow, Russia)
Director, ROSIZO State Centre for Museums, Ministry of Culture

Bevin Bering Dubrowski (Houston, Texas, USA)
Executive Director, Houston Center of Photography

Anne Biroleau (Paris, France)
Conservateur général, Bibliothèque Nationale de France

Lars Boering (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Director, Lux Photo Gallery

Jim Casper (Paris, France)
Founder and Director, Lens Culture

Irina Chmyreva (Moscow, Russia)
Photography Curator, Researcher, Russian Academy of Arts

Bridget Coaker (London, UK)
Picture Editor, Guardian & Observer newspapers; Director, Troika Editions

Stephen Cohen (Los Angeles, California, USA)
Director, Stephen Cohen Gallery; Co-founder, photo la

Sara Distin (New York, New York, USA)
Group Director, Curation + Content, 20×200.com, Jen Bekman Gallery

Liza Fetissova (Paris, France)
Director, RussianTeaRoom Gallery

Marc Feustel (Paris, France)
Curator, Author and Publisher, Studio Equis / Eyecurious

Taj Forer (New York, New York, USA)
Director, Daylight Magazine

Jens Friis (Odense, Denmark)
Assistant Director, Museet for Fotokunst; Editor, KATALOG journal of photography & video

Elda Harrington (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
Director, Encuentros Abiertos de Fotografia

Elina Heikka (Helsinki, Finland)
Director, The Finnish Museum of Photography

Magdalena Herrera (Paris, France)
Director of Photography, GEO magazine

Barbara Herrmann (Paris, France)
Photo Editor, Stern Magazine

Greg Hobson (Bradford, UK)
Curator of Photographs, National Media Museum

Karol Hordziej (Krakow, Poland)
Artistic Director, Photomonth

Bill Kouwenhoven (Berlin, Germany)
International Editor, HotShoe magazine

Christophe Laloi (Arles, France)
Artistic Director, Voies Off

Jason Landry (Boston, Massachusetts, USA)
Owner and Director, Panopticon Gallery

Patricia Lanza (Los Angeles, California, USA)
Director of Talent & Content, The Annenberg Space for Photography

Jean-Claude Lemagny (Paris, France)
Conservateur Général Honoraire, Bibliothèque Nationale de France

Dewi Lewis (London, UK)
Publisher, Dewi Lewis Publishing

Rebecca McClelland (London, UK)
Photography Editor NewStatesman; Deputy Director, Ian Parry Scholarship

Jeff Moorfoot (Ballarat, Australia)
Festival Director, Ballarat International Foto Biennale

Andreas Müller-Pohle (Berlin, Germany)
Artist, Publisher and Editor of European Photography Magazine

Maria Patomella (Stockholm, Sweden)
Curator, Fotografiska (The Swedish Museum of Photography)

Alexandre Percy (Paris, France)
Director, acte2galerie

Marc Prüst (Paris, France)
Artistic Director, LagosPhoto Festival; Executive Director, Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation; Curator and Photography Consultant

Chris Rauschenberg (Portland, Oregon, USA)
Board Chair, Blue Sky Gallery

Arianna Rinaldo (Milan, Italy)
Photo Consultant, D Magazine; Director, OjodePez; Freelance Curator

Tina Schelhorn (Cologne, Germany)
Founding Director of Galerie Lichtblick

Maarten Schilt (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Schilt Publishing

Aaron Schuman (United Kingdom)
Photographer, Writer, Curator, and Founding Editor of SeeSaw Magazine

Ellen-K Syverstad (Oslo, Norway)
Co-founder PUG gallery and museum, Risør Photography Festival

Barbara Tannenbaum (Cleveland, Ohio, USA)
Curator of Photography, Cleveland Museum of Art

Natalia Tarasova (Moscow, Russia)
Curator of exhibitions of contemporary photography

Charles H. Traub (New York, NY, USA)
Chair, MFA Photography, Video & Related Media Dept., School of Visual Arts

Charlotte van Lingen (Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
Curator, The Kunsthal Rotterdam

Wendy Watriss (Houston, Texas, USA)
Creative Director, Co-Founder, FotoFest

Randy West (New York, NY, USA)
Director, MFA Photography, Video & Related Media Dept., School of Visual Arts

Joanne Junga Yang (Seoul, Korea)
Director, Y&G Art; Curator, Seoul Photo Festival 2011

Collection Photographers: News and Exhibitions

We are thrilled to report that a slew of our favorite collection photographers have had some great press lately for current or recent exhibitions. We are proud to call them colleagues and friends! Thank you to all of our collection photographers for constantly challenging our perception and perspectives and providing a platform for creative thought and engagement.

The PBS News Hour featured the Andre Kertesz: On Reading exhibition with a lengthy article accompanied by a short video. The exhibition was organized by the MoCP and is currently on view at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh until Feb 13, 2011.

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Photos by Dawoud Bey/Courtesy of Harn Museum of Art

The Harn Museum in Gainesville, FL is currently exhibiting two shows by Dawoud Bey: Class Pictures: Photographs by Dawoud Bey and Dawoud Bey: First-Year Florida Project. The First Year Florida Project features about 20 photographs of 40 Univeristy of Florida students taken over an intense two-week artist residency in July.

Sarah Hoskins and her ongoing series The Homeplace were the focuses of an episode of NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. For this project, Hoskins has been traveling for years back and forth from Illinois to small communities surrounding Lexington, Kentucky. As the article explains, “When she started taking photographs, she hoped to bring a historic part of America’s post-Civil War past to life. Ten years later, she’s become part of the community she came to observe.”

Ben Gest: Commisure is on view at the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore through January 23, 2011. Michael O’Sullivan gave a great review of the show in the Washington Post. For O’Sullivan, the perspective in Gest’s images suggests that his subjects and environments “seem skewed or warped at impossible, even vertiginous angles” and “in some, the instability is so great that Gest’s subjects appear on the verge of sliding out of their frames.” Makes you want to go see it, right?

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, Ben Gest. Ben and Dawn, 2009

Grange Prize finalist Leslie Hewitt has won the Wein Artist prize from the Studio Museum in Harlem. Hewitt was awarded an unrestricted $50,000 prize, given to “an African-American artist of great innovation and promise.” Another Grange Prize finalist, Moyra Davey, was interviewed by Jane Adams for the Globe and Mail regarding her photographic practice and a few of her works. You can still see a few works by both Hewitt and Davey at the MoCP through December 22.

Laura Valenti and Don Frank are two artists in a two-person show at the Lightbox Photographic Gallery in Oregon, through December 8. Valenti’s The Family Home and Frank’s Oooh Isn’t It Pretty both explore environmentally sensitive themes. Read more from this Coast Weekend review.

And finally, Flavorpill highlighted the photographs of Herb Ritts and put together a pretty nice slide show of his work.

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Herb Ritts, Richard Gere, San Bernandino, 1978