Tag Archives: Canadian Photographer

Ulric Collette


Canadian photographer Ulric Collette seeks to answer the question: How much do you and your family members really look alike? with his series, Genetic Portraits.  Ulric is a Quebec-based graphic designer and photographer is exploring the genetic similarities between different members of the same family (fathers and sons, mothers and daugthers, brothers, sisters, etc). 
By splitting their faces in half and then blending them together in a single face, he highlights the mysteries of genetic resemblances and differences and create interesting new people that are sometimes quite normal looking and other times far from it.  If faces might somehow reveal something about the character of a person, perhaps Ulric’s hybrid family portraits suggest that they also give an insight to the nature of our families. 
Ulric works as an art director for Collette, an advertising studio in Quebec city. Ulric’s work has been featured in magazines and books all over the world (Prism, Global Investor, Esquire, Lumière et Lens, Snap, Fubiz, My Modern Met, Plateform, Adobe, Explora, New York Daily News, Discovery Chanel, etc). Most recently, his work on the genetic serie was shortlisted in the world most prestigious advertising awards show, the Cannes Lion. 

Ewa Zebrowski

Venice, Italy is a place of magic and mystery and Canadian photographer Ewa Zebrowski has captured those qualities beautifully with her series, of time, lost. Painterly and evocative, the photographs feel like the narrative of a dream, set another life and era.  Ewa has traveled to Venice six times in the winter to make work that is embedded with memory and history, sometimes inspired by literature, sometimes collaborating with writers and poets.

Currently living in Montreal, Ewa was born in London, to Polish parents, and worked in the film industry for 17 years before obtaining a BFA in Fine Arts and an MFA in Visual Arts, from Concordia and UQAM, in Montreal, Quebec. Ewa has exhibited widely, produced eleven artist’s books, and her work and books can be found in many public
and private collections in Canada, the United States, and abroad, including the
collections of the Musee d’Art Contemporain de Montreal, the Art Gallery of
Ontario, the Center for Book Arts New York, the Cirque du Soleil,  the National Library of Canada,  the Bibliothèque Nationale de France,
the Bibliothèque Nationale du Québec, 
the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and Yale University.  Ewa’s work is on exhibition as part of the permanent exhibition, Montreal—Points of View, at the McCord Museum in Montréal, Québec through January 13, 2013.


of time, lost

let me tell you something about desire…
I long for dark rooms.
Crumbling architecture, peeling wallpaper,
floors
Polished by years of use.
Dim light.
Mirrors darkened with time,
suspended in silence.

I long for empty rooms.
The residue of emotion contained
within.
Remnants.
Traces of passage,
Forgotten, like wilted bouquets.

I long for silence.
When absence and presence collide,
Emotions unexpressed.
Like forgotten photographs,
And silver teapots,
Tarnished and abandoned in haste.

All the memories,
Wrapped in tissue paper,
Fragile
and left behind.
All the books gone,
The shelves empty.

EMZ
Over the last nine years I have made six trips to Venice, always to photograph, seduced by the unwritten poetry of this ephemeral place. Each time I return I think that it will be my last trip, and yet something pulls me back to continue exploring this city caught in history and in memory.

Ewa Zebrowski

Venice, Italy is a place of magic and mystery and Canadian photographer Ewa Monika Zebrowski has captured those qualities beautifully with her series, of time, lost. Painterly and evocative, the photographs feel like the narrative of a dream, set another life and era.  Ewa has traveled to Venice six times in the winter to make work that is embedded with memory and history, sometimes inspired by literature, sometimes collaborating with writers and poets.

Currently living in Montreal, Ewa was born in London, to Polish parents, and worked in the film industry for 17 years before obtaining a BFA in Fine Arts and an MFA in Visual Arts, from Concordia and UQAM, in Montreal, Quebec. Ewa has exhibited widely, produced eleven artist’s books, and her work and books can be found in many public
and private collections in Canada, the United States, and abroad, including the
collections of the Musee d’Art Contemporain de Montreal, the Art Gallery of
Ontario, the Center for Book Arts New York, the Cirque du Soleil,  the National Library of Canada,  the Bibliothèque Nationale de France,
the Bibliothèque Nationale du Québec, 
the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and Yale University.  Ewa’s work is on exhibition as part of the permanent exhibition, Montreal—Points of View, at the McCord Museum in Montréal, Québec through January 13, 2013.


of time, lost

let me tell you something about desire…
I long for dark rooms.
Crumbling architecture, peeling wallpaper,
floors
Polished by years of use.
Dim light.
Mirrors darkened with time,
suspended in silence.

I long for empty rooms.
The residue of emotion contained
within.
Remnants.
Traces of passage,
Forgotten, like wilted bouquets.

I long for silence.
When absence and presence collide,
Emotions unexpressed.
Like forgotten photographs,
And silver teapots,
Tarnished and abandoned in haste.

All the memories,
Wrapped in tissue paper,
Fragile
and left behind.
All the books gone,
The shelves empty.

EMZ
Over the last nine years I have made six trips to Venice, always to photograph, seduced by the unwritten poetry of this ephemeral place. Each time I return I think that it will be my last trip, and yet something pulls me back to continue exploring this city caught in history and in memory.

Jessica Eaton: Cube, Color, Cosmos

Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton uses her camera to create color invisible to the naked eye. She gives bright hues to gray forms in her series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt, and that work was recently awarded the photography prize at the 2012 Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography—a prize for which TIME’s director of photography Kira Pollack sat on the jury.

Jessica Eaton

A gray cube in Eaton’s studio

“We’ve all mixed two colors of paint together, and either it makes another color or, if you keep going, it gets muddy and progressively gets darker,” she explains. “In light, things work really differently.” Eaton explains that she exploits the properties of light through additive color separation: whereas the primary pigment colors (red, blue, yellow) get darker as they blend, the primary colors of light (red, blue, green) move toward white. Eaton applies filters in those three colors to her camera and takes multiple exposures, a process that turns the gray form seen here into the vibrant ones seen above. “The color itself is mixed inside the camera,” she says.

One of the byproducts of Eaton’s process is an element of surprise: because her images are created within the camera, she doesn’t know what she’ll get until the photos are developed. “It’s a bit of a conversation with the world,” she says. “With the forces of time and space and contingency and errors that happen, because often there’s so many steps going into one of these, I get back something that’s also new to me, and those are the pictures that tend to end up in exhibits.”

Jessica Eaton

Filter Samples for Spectrum, 2009

Her work in other series, samples of which are also included in this gallery, may use different techniques (for example, Spectrum is the product of covering a window with gels, as shown here), but they all come back to experimentation with light and color. That experimentation is something that she has been building toward throughout her career. Eaton says that when she began taking pictures, in 1998, her work tended toward documentary and portrait photography. But even then, working in the dark room, she says that she felt a push to test different processes and see what would happen. She was aware of the science of light at work even in what she calls “normal” photographs, aware that subject and content buried those phenomena, preventing viewers from seeing what was there. In 2006, her work shifted and she began to bring those hidden elements to the forefront. She isolated light and color and time, even though to do so was to challenge the classical definition of photography as a way to capture a single moment. Her multiple exposures—as in Quantum Pong, which comprises four exposures of more than 500 ping-pong balls that had been dropped 20 feet—allow her to leave that definition behind. “In most of these photographs, what you’re looking at is more than one moment,” she says. “They aren’t static moments of time. They’re layers of time.”

But the photographer likes challenging definitions, and not just photographic ones. Although she dislikes the term “abstract” as a description of her work—it implies that the light she captures doesn’t exist in reality—Eaton says that her photographs acknowledge “how incredibly limited our ability to perceive the world is.” We lack the sensory mechanisms to see her colors with our naked eyes, and Eaton sees that as a metaphor for our inability to see the extent of the physical universe, whether it includes multiple dimensions or parallel universes. And, in that metaphor, she sees hope. “I love the idea that no matter how bad it gets,” she says, “there’s this wild so-called reality way beyond what we have decided it is.”

Jessica Eaton is a Canadian photographer. Her work will be presented in a solo show at next year’s Hyères festival. See more of her work here or here.

Video: Tom Waits narrates a brief history of John Baldessari

directory submission .

Now for something light, entertaining, educational and inspiring.

Thanks to Colleen Leonard (famous Canadian photographer and former Lens Culture assistant editor) for sharing this with us, via Hyperallergic.

Guy Tremblay

We are judgemental people. It’s human nature to assume things, to form opinions about the people we don’t know. Canadian photographer, Guy Tremblay, is looking at this phenomenon with his series, Ton visage me dit quelque chose (Your face tells (reveals) me something) . Revisiting an idea he had in 2003, he asked social workers that deal with the homeless and the addicted, to bring one of their “clients” to the shoot. It is up to the viewer to decide which one is the social worker, and which one is the client.

Marie-Michèle

Guy has been involved with photography for almost thirty years, not only in creating work, but he organized the Mois de la Photo à St-Camille for the past seven years. He also teaches photography to teenagers on a volunteer basis in collaboration with different organizations. He has received grants from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Quebec, in addition to many solo and group exhibitions. His photographs are held in public and private collections in Canada, the United States, Europe and Asia.

In Ton visage me dit quelque chose, all the social workers from Sherbrooke, PQ were photographed. I asked them to bring along one of their clients for the photo shooting. One of the goals of that series was to demystify the reality of the street, to get away from the usual cliché. I wanted to put the subject in a neutral context without the reference to the street. This way, it became pretty hard to categorize them. I usually ask the people not to smile when I make their portrait. But this time I let them loose, I wanted to get true feeling not an artificial image. I wanted them to be themself with dignity and not to show them as miserable or with problems.

Annie

In 2003 I made a similar series « un trentième de seconde » (On third of a second). The former series was all made outside in a disaffected area ( An easy to find meeting point downtown Sherbrooke). For the new series, I decided to use a makeshift studio that was mounted for each meeting in the office of the street workers (Coalition Sherbrookoise pour le travail de rue) right downtown. By using this setup, I also wanted to pay a tribute to Irving Penn who was a major inspiration to me.

Daniel

All the portraits were made with a medium format camera and they are silver gelatine prints, selenium toned to respect Mr. Penn’s spirit. Few years ago, Mr. Penn personally encouraged me to continue in that direction.

Émily, Jessica and Sharlie

Erick

Geneviève

Mathieu and Akiam

Michaël

Michel M.

Michel P.

Milène

Rémi

Roch-Henri

Sophie

Sylvain

A Gun to Your Head: Inside Post-Soviet Interrogation Rooms

In academic and literary criticism, the verb “to interrogate” is often a neutral term, stripped of its more violent, forceful resonance. But in Donald Weber’s new book, Interrogations, itself an “interrogation” of the way state power plays out across stretches of Eastern Europe, the Canadian photographer seeks to show the brutality and helplessness that undergirds almost all societies.

The images above are scenes from interrogation rooms, the product of seven years of exploring Russia and the Ukraine and befriending and winning the trust of ordinary police officers. They are stark and bleak. Detained suspects sit slumped in empty rooms, their faces stretched in terror, shame and resignation. A teenager under suspicion of shoplifting bursts into tears; when his interrogation goes wrong, a supposed car thief finds himself pinioned to the table, his hands limply warding against a gun pointed down on his skull.

Weber says the scenes are not out of the ordinary. The interrogations are conducted by officers who are “respected in their departments,” he says. “They rose through the ranks and did the job required. What I think is so powerful is that this is not a rogue set of cops. This is standard practice, it is what it is. It’s the utter terror of a wayward bureaucracy.”

On one level, that’s an indictment of the ethical vagaries of policing in post-Soviet countries. But on another, Weber is illustrating—dramatically, to be sure—how state power essentially functions the world over. French philosopher Louis Althusser famously placed the moment we recognize our subservience to the authority of a state in a street scene where one is confronted by a police officer. The officer, writes Althusser, shouts: “‘Hey, you there!’… Assuming that the theoretical scene I have imagined takes place in the street, the hailed individual will turn round. By this mere one-hundred-and-eighty-degree physical conversion, he becomes a subject.”

That subjection—that subjugation—is all too apparent in the suspects Weber photographs. Even in full-fledged, mature democracies, one still feels a kind of nakedness when in the crosshairs of the law, a vulnerability that can only be mitigated after the fact by norms of due process and habeas corpus. Says Weber: “This is work not about Ukraine or Russia or even the former Soviet Union, but instead a way to see the modern State as a primitive and sacrificial rite.”

That’s a particularly dark interpretation of how power gets wielded and realized, but it’s echoed in public opinion polls throughout the post-Soviet world. Twenty years since the fall of Communism, a significant majority of people in Ukraine and Russia have lost faith in both the promise of free-market capitalism as well as multiparty democracy. This disillusionment with politics has much to do with disgust at what some say are kleptocratic, domineering elites in both countries. But it also indicates a deeper gloominess: the sense perhaps that, whatever the dominant ideology of the day, there’s always the prospect of the interrogation room, and the grim, subterranean power that it holds over of us.

Interrogations was published this month by Schilt Publishing. Weber’s series recently won first place at the World Press Photo awards in the Portraits—Stories category.

Ishaan Tharoor writes for TIME and is editor of Global Spin. You can find him on Twitter at ishaantharoor

Photographer #413: Andrew B. Myers

Andrew B. Myers, 1987, is a young Canadian photographer based in Toronto. He has a very distinct photographic style. His work is aesthetic, using carefully placed objects on simple color backgrounds which creates a large area of negative space. Due to the use of negative space the images gain an awkward flatness. His photographs are well composed, graphic and stylish. The sunlit shadows, washed out colors as well as the objects used refer back to the 1970’s and 1980’s with a modern twist. Andrew’s photographs contain elements of nostalgia and pop culture. The following images come from the portfolio’s 2011 PT.1, 2010 PT.1 and 2009.


Website: www.andrewbmyers.com