Tag Archives: Brooklyn Bridge

Kristoffer Axén at ICP, Photoville

The Rabbit Hole, At Sea At Night by Kristoffer Axén

Congratulations to Kristoffer Axén, whose images Day Three and The Conversation will join the Photography Collection at the ICP next month. The photographs are part of a new, on-going, series called ‘Events in Nature’ (from which a selection can be viewed at this year’s Tierney Fellowship Exhibition at Photoville, the new Brooklyn-based photo destination).

The Tierney Fellowship was created in 2003 by The Tierney Family Foundation to support emerging artists in the field of photography. Axén will be exhibited among a promising roster of artist, which includes Nicholas Calcott, Luo Dan, Ishaan Dixit, Gabrielle Goliath, Emily Kinni, Bryan Krueger, Carlos Licon, Mack Michael Magagane, Bruno Ruiz, Rubi Rose Siblo-Landsman, Roberto Tondopó, Aubrey Tseleng, and Terttu Uibopuu.

The Tierney Fellowship Exhibition
Opening | Friday June 22, 7 to 10PM, on view through July 1
Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York City

 


›› The successful Fotojatka festival that traveled to cinemas around the Czech Republic – screening specially produced photographic slideshow – is now over. But, you can still view Kristoffer Axén’s contribution online, featured alongside slideshows by more than a dozen contemporary photographers, amongst them Erwin Olaf, Nikos Economopoulos and Reiner Riedler.
›› For those interested in introducing prints from Kristoffer Axén into their personal collection of photography, we recommend The Rabbit Hole from the series At Sea At Night, available via Aperture

Underage: Young Photographers

The amazing editor, Alison Zavos of the Feature Shoot blog, and visonary gallery director, Amanda Gorence have curated an exhibition, Underage, featuring six young photographers who document the the joys and travails of growing up in today’s world. Their photographs reveal a savvy and insight into a way of visual thinking that belies the calendar, truly remarkable as they are at an age where most of us were still picking the lint out of our belly buttons and wondering what to do with our lives.

The exhibition is at Pier 3 Uplands in Brooklyn Bridge Park and is part of Photoville, a unique photo village build from shipping containers.  Photoville and the Underage Exhibition will run through July 1st.

Select images from Underage

Aiden Morse

Growing up the secluded Australian island of Tasmania with only half a million inhabitants, it makes sense why Aiden Morse’s photographs convey a sense of lonliness.  Seventeen-year-old Morse started making photographs at 15, experimenting with both film and digital.  “For this series, I’ve been playing around with the aesthetic of ’70s and ’80s sci-fi and horror films, ” said Morse.  Morse’s inspriations are names; Edward Hopper, Gregory Crewdson, Steven Spielberg, and Stanley Kubrick; all men who evoke a sense of solitude or dramatic eeriness in their respective media.

“For as long as I can remember I have been obsessed with observing adolescence and the transition to adulthood,” said 20- year-old Charlie Brophy.  The Australian photographer has been photographing teenage ambiguity since she fell in love with the darkroom at age 15.  “I am interested in the responsibilities teenagers take on between the transition from adolescence to adulthood…and the freedom of sexual androgyny that youth of today explore,” said Brophy.


Claire Oring

Claire Oring’s dreamy photos tell stories of nature, mysticism, and folklore, and centers around coming of age girls and their youthful perspectives. Oring credits her signature romantic and mystical themes to her love of art history.  “I look up to a lot of classical painters from the Renasissance and the Romantic ers…and the Pre-Raphaelites,” said Oring.  “The tell a story in each painting.”

 Lissy Laricchia

At the age of 18, Lissy Elle Laricchia is legally an adult, but her photos of tea parties, levitating girls in the forst, and poised ballerinas still have a firm grasp on childhood.  “Nothing inspires me like childish things…the love of learning and exploring what we as adults lose along the way,” said Laricchia.

Olivia Bee, born Olivia Bolles, is a
17-year-old photographer based in Portland, Oregon. Her intimate photos of
friends, youth, and falling in love for the first time feel like pages ripped
out of Bee’s own diary. “Everything can last forever when you’re 15 or 16,”
said Bee. “I think it’s one of the purest forms of love.”

From 2010 to 2011, 22 year-old Violet Forest documented her sister Vickie’s life.  She ended up with a raw and revealing look into her 24-year-old sibling’s struggles, romantic battles, and moments of peach that “depend on the familial intimacy between two sisters to explore the complexities of the individual,” said Forest.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • Life shares a slideshow of black-and-white, mid-century images, “Orange Crush: In Praise of the Golden Gate Bridge,” to celebrate the  iconic bridge’s 75-year anniversary this Sunday, May 27, 2012. Coming soon: Aperture commemorates with a beautiful, oversized reissue of Richard Misrach’s monograph Golden Gate, in which the photographer shot the bridge in large format from his front porch at all times of the day for three years.
  • New Yorker‘s PhotoBooth and Time’s LightBox both share selections from the recently released 870,000-image archive of historical New York City photographs by the department of records. Both feature work by Eugene de Salignac of the Aperture monograph New York Rises (2007). A limited edition print of “Brooklyn Bridge, showing painters on suspenders, October 7, 1914” is featured on the cover of the monograph and in Time’s selection.
  • More on Gordon Parks this week, who was featured in David Campany’s essay in Aperture issue 206 and currently has a retrospective at the International Center of Photography, celebrating the centennial of his birth. PDN shares a 10-image gallery of his work, while La Lettre de la Photographie publishes a 1993 interview with Parks conducted by John Leongard, on what it was like photographing Black Muslims for Life magazine in the 60s.
  • Fototazo posts a lengthy recap of their group book discussion of Walker EvansAmerican Photographs with Flak Photo’s Andy Adams, focusing on essays from Gerry Badger’s The Pleasure of Good Photographs. The discussion, which is hosted on Facebook, continued Monday with the essay ”A Certain Sensibility: John Gossage, the Photographer as Auteur.” Stay tuned for a discussion of the essay ”Without Author or Art: The ‘Quiet’ Photograph” on Monday, June 4, 2012.
  • Rebecca Norris Webb, who spoke at Aperture gallery on Friday, March 23, 2012 during a co-lecture with Alex Webb, writes on the process of putting together her monograph My Dakota, launched on May 24, 2012 at the International Center of Photography, for Time’s LightBox. Work from the book will be exhibited at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City, South Dakota, June 1 – October 13, 2012.
  • Photoshelter Blog interviews a multitude of industry professionals and posts “7 Myths About Portfolio Reviews Debunked,” which could be similarly useful to emerging photographers as their May 10 piece “Photography Through the Eyes of Art Directors,” featuring work from Alex Prager.
  • Appropriately timed, American Photo Magazine posts their annual list of Top 10 Photographers who shoot weddings, which is where most our staff here seems to have taken off for the long weekend. A companion piece at PopPhoto takes a closer look at these photographers’ gear and process.

Brooklyn Bridge: Historic Photo of a New York Landmark

On April 24, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg released a digital trove of 870,000 photographs, maps and videos that document more than 150 years of Big Apple history, starting in 1858. Among the highlights is a series of images showcasing the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, which opened to the public 129 years ago on Thursday.

The evocative, black-and-white photographs are not only remarkable for the intimate and playful details they capture, including a shot of workers painting the Brooklyn Bridge in 1914—without harness!—but also because they were taken by an amateur photographer named Eugene de Salignac, who was a municipal worker from 1906-1934.

Eugene de Salignac

Under the bridge on the Brooklyn side, 1918.

“He was an extremely talented photographer who was tasked with documenting the building of the city,” says Eileen Flannelly, New York City’s deputy commissioner for the department of records. “Unfortunately, he didn’t get recognition for his images during his lifetime. He was just a civil service employee, really unknown. I don’t think people really understood then that he was showing us how our city was built.”

The push to unveil this digital archive has been in the works for nearly four years, and it’s likely to become a hallmark achievement for Mayor Bloomberg, who has made it a mission to support technological initiatives during his tenure. Other photographs from the archive give viewers an inside look at the city’s grisly crime scenes, old Times Square and various borough presidents’ offices. “I look at the crime scene and it’s like looking at an old gangster movies—they’re fascinating because they don’t look real,” Flannelly says. “Then I look at pictures from the ‘80s and see how much the city has changed. It’s fascinating because you don’t have to go too far back to see how far we’ve come.”

The New York City Municipal Archives Photo Gallery can be browsed online here.

Taking It to the Streets

The Occupy Wall Street movement has, at times, been chaotic. During an Oct. 1 march across the Brooklyn Bridge, more than 700 people were arrested. On Oct. 15, when protesters took over Times Square, two policeman were injured as the NYPD had to use horses to bash barricades back into place when protesters tried to push through them. I was ever so skeptical when I first met photographer Sasha Bezzubov. I had seen his extraordinary work, so I didn’t doubt his ability for a second, but I knew how chaotic the protests could become.

In my short career as a working journalist, I’ve had the pleasure of working mostly with combat photographers like Kadir van Lohuizen and Erin Trieb. Combat photographers move quickly—shooting, ducking, shifting and shooting again. Somehow they make sense of chaos, and great beauty develops out of their constant motion.

Sasha shoots on film from a tripod, and I knew that he would take great photos, but I knew it would involve some crowd control. Sasha, known for his portrait typologies of travelers and adventurers, shot some extraordinary portraits in his two days at Zuccotti Park, Occupy Wall Street’s base camp. His subjects were a perfect anthropological study of the people who populate the movement: the old and the young, the employed and the searching, the curious and the erudite. As the sun began to set on the first day, Sasha ran out from the crowd and said he had seen a woman holding a bird. He asked me to see if we could take her portrait. She had the most piercing eyes, and I knew Sasha would take an excellent photograph. It turns out that the woman was the one seen on YouTube by more than a million people falling screaming to her knees, after a police commander sprayed pepper in her face. We had been writing about her for a week and only then found out who she was.

Sasha Bezzubov for TIME

Kaylee Dedrick, activist. October 7, 2011

That was one of the treasures to come out of working with Sasha. The rest are shown here. And for the record, the bird survived and, a few days later, flew away.

Sasha Bezzubov is a Brooklyn based photographer. Facts on the Ground, an exhibition by Bezzubov and his collaborator Jessica Sucher is on view at Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York through October 22. More of his work can be seen here.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings. Continue the discussion on TIME‘s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

Taking It to the Streets

The Occupy Wall Street movement has, at times, been chaotic. During an Oct. 1 march across the Brooklyn Bridge, more than 700 people were arrested. On Oct. 15, when protesters took over Times Square, two policeman were injured as the NYPD had to use horses to bash barricades back into place when protesters tried to push through them. I was ever so skeptical when I first met photographer Sasha Bezzubov. I had seen his extraordinary work, so I didn’t doubt his ability for a second, but I knew how chaotic the protests could become.

In my short career as a working journalist, I’ve had the pleasure of working mostly with combat photographers like Kadir van Lohuizen and Erin Trieb. Combat photographers move quickly—shooting, ducking, shifting and shooting again. Somehow they make sense of chaos, and great beauty develops out of their constant motion.

Sasha shoots on film from a tripod, and I knew that he would take great photos, but I knew it would involve some crowd control. Sasha, known for his portrait typologies of travelers and adventurers, shot some extraordinary portraits in his two days at Zuccotti Park, Occupy Wall Street’s base camp. His subjects were a perfect anthropological study of the people who populate the movement: the old and the young, the employed and the searching, the curious and the erudite. As the sun began to set on the first day, Sasha ran out from the crowd and said he had seen a woman holding a bird. He asked me to see if we could take her portrait. She had the most piercing eyes, and I knew Sasha would take an excellent photograph. It turns out that the woman was the one seen on YouTube by more than a million people falling screaming to her knees, after a police commander sprayed pepper in her face. We had been writing about her for a week and only then found out who she was.

Sasha Bezzubov for TIME

Kaylee Dedrick, activist. October 7, 2011

That was one of the treasures to come out of working with Sasha. The rest are shown here. And for the record, the bird survived and, a few days later, flew away.

Sasha Bezzubov is a Brooklyn based photographer. Facts on the Ground, an exhibition by Bezzubov and his collaborator Jessica Sucher is on view at Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York through October 22. More of his work can be seen here.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings. Continue the discussion on TIME‘s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.