Tag Archives: Bronx Museum Of The Arts

Jaime Permuth

Guatemalan photographer, Jaime Permuth, lives, works and teaches in New York City. Jaime takes advantage of New York and Guatemala’s rich visual cultures and interprets his curiosity about these places through projects that are varied and intriguing–projects have started by picking up a copy of the Torah Times on the subway and discovering places for Afternoon Prayer in New York, or contemplating Adam and Eve in the 21st Century. The work featured today is about the scrap metal community in Willets Point, Queens, New York, and is titled, Yonkeros.

Jaime has  exhibited internationally at the Museo Nacional de Arte Moderno in Guatemala, Casa del Lago in Mexico City, and the Israeli Parliament. In NYC,  he has shown his work at The Museum of Modern Art, The Queens Museum of Art, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, The Museum of the City of New York, The Jewish Museum, El Museo del Barrio, and The Brooklyn Museum of Art. His work can be found in the collections of The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Museum of the City of New York, Yeshiva University Museum, State University of New York New Paltz, Art Museum of the Americas (DC), Fullerton Art Museum (CA) and Museum of Art Ft. Lauderdale (FLA).  He is a Faculty Member at the School of Visual Arts where he teaches in the Master of Professional Studies in Digital Photography program.

 Yonkeros is a popular term for businesses that strip wrecked cars and sell them as scrap metal or for parts. The term is a Spanglish derivative of “junk”, conjugated grammatically to refer to people who engage in this line of work.

Yonkeros is a lyrical exploration of first world consumerism, waste, and obsolescence as they intersect with third world ingenuity and survivalist strategies in the no-man’s-land of Willets Point, Queens.

This series of photographs is both an appeal and a eulogy; the City of New York is determined to erase the existence of this small enclave, not withstanding that it continues to provide an essential service to the community and that it constitutes a source of income and employment to a segment of the city’s immigrant working class. But above all, Willets Point is a vast inventory of parts, and like all catalogues it is also a poem.

Rachel Hulin, Picnic

Rachel Hulin, Picnic

Rachel Hulin

Picnic,
Storrs, Connecticut, 2012
Website – RachelHulin.com

Rachel Hulin is a writer and photographer. Her work has been shown at Jen Bekman Gallery, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Wallspace Gallery, and The New York Photo Festival. She has written about photography for Photo District News, Emerging Photographer Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, and The Faster Times. She is editor and co-founder of The Photography Post. Her first book — A children's photography book about a flying baby — will be published by powerHouse in April 2013.

Rachel Hulin

When Kevin Miyazaki released this month’s Collect Give image by photographer Rachel Hulin, my mouth curled into a huge grin and I had to see more. The image is in an edition of 20, selling for $40 to benefit Children’s Friend, organization helps children facing poverty, language barriers, lack of education, substance abuse, and difficulty accessing health care. Children’s Friend supports families by creating safe and nurturing environments for children during the crucial early years, helping parents gain access to the resources, education, and support that they need.

Rachel is a photographer and writer based in Providence, Rhode Island and New York City. Her work has been shown at ICP, Jen Bekman Gallery, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Wallspace Gallery, and The New York Photo Festival. Her writing has appeared in The Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, PDN, and The Photography Post, which she co-founded in 2010. She has a BA from Brown University and an MA from NYU. She lives with her husband and son Henry in a former seltzer factory and likes to help Henry fly.

I Spy: Photography and the Theater of the Street

Subway Portraits, 1938-1941 (c) Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Robert Frank, Walker Evans, Bruce Davidson, Harry Callahan, Philip-Lorca diCorcia and Beat Streuli explore the comedy and drama of life in public spaces in I Spy: Photography and the Theater of the Street, 1938-2010 on view in the West Building at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC April 22 – August 5, 2012. Nearly 90 works by masters of the genre, many culled from the gallery’s collection, showcase everyday urban life as subject and source of inspiration.

Walker Evans’ grainy black and white images from Subway Portraits, 1938-1941, feature prominently in the exhibition and provide a compelling counterpoint to Bruce Davidson’s multitude of rich kodachromes from the monograph Subway (Aperture 2011). [A very different project from Davidson’s current and exciting endeavor documenting the “Nature of Los Angeles.”]

Work by Robert Frank, one of the pioneers of the genre with photos “snapped seemingly mid-stride,” some have said, has also been featured in a similar retrospective exhibition and accompanying photobook, co-published by Aperture and The Bronx Museum of the Arts in 2008, Street Art, Street Life: From the 1950′s to Now.

Philip-Lorca diCorcia’s work is also featured in The New York Times Magazine Photographs, edited by Kathy Ryan (Aperture 2011).

Subway, 1980-1981 (c) Bruce Davidson

I Spy: Photography and the Theater of the Streets
Exhibition on view:
April 22 – August 5, 2012

National Gallery of Art
Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
(202) 737-4215

 

Rachel Hulin, Hall Flight

Rachel Hulin, Hall Flight

Rachel Hulin

Hall Flight,
Providence, Rhode Island, 2011
From the The Flying Series series
Website – RachelHulin.com

Rachel Hulin is a writer and photographer. Her work has been shown at Jen Bekman Gallery, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Wallspace Gallery, and The New York Photo Festival. She has written about photography for Photo District News, Emerging Photographer Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, and The Faster Times. She is editor and co-founder of The Photography Post.