Tag Archives: British Journal Of Photography

Aaron Schuman, Untitled

Aaron Schuman, Untitled

Aaron Schuman

Untitled,
Somerset, England, 2012
From the Summer Set series
Website – AaronSchuman.com

Aaron Schuman is an American photographer, editor, writer and curator based in the United Kingdom. His photographic work is exhibited internationally, and he regularly contributes photography, articles, essays and interviews to a wide-range of publications, including Aperture, Foam Magazine, Photoworks, ArtReview, Modern Painters, Hotshoe International, British Journal of Photography, and more; he has also published writings in a number of recently released books, including Pieter Hugo: This Must Be the Place (Prestel, 2012), Photographs Not Taken (Daylight, 2012), and Hijacked 3 (Big City Press, 2012). In 2010, Schuman curated Whatever Was Splendid: New American Photographs, a principal exhibitions at the 2010 Fotofest Biennial (Houston, USA); in 2011 he curated Other I: Alec Soth, Wassink Lundgren, Viviane Sassen at Hotshoe Gallery (London, UK); and he is in the midst of curating In Appropriation for the Houston Center of Photography, opening in September 2012. Schuman is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Brighton and the Arts University College at Bournemouth. He is also the founder, director and editor of the online photography journal, SeeSaw Magazine.
 

Richard Rowland, Untitled

Richard Rowland, Untitled

Richard Rowland

Untitled,
Mumbai, India, 2012
From the Mumbai Stories series
Website – RichardRowland.co.uk

Richard Rowland lives in Brighton, England where he received his BA in photography in 2005. He has a passion for the urban environment and this has led him to undertake projects in cities including Shanghai, Dubai, London and Mumbai. Richard’s work has been included in both national and international publications as well as solo and group exhibitions at the University of Westminster, London, The National Galley, Kosovo, FORMAT Festival (UK), and the Brighton Photo Biennial, England. I recent years he has been regularly funded by Arts Council England the National Lottery (UK). He earns his living as a freelance photographer for design, editorial and publishing clients. Richard’s work has appeared in publications including The Guardian, British Journal of Photography, Vogue and Wallpaper Magazine. 

Viktoria Sorochinski, Attachment

Viktoria Sorochinski, Attachment

Viktoria Sorochinski

Attachment,
Montreal, 2006
From the Anna & Eve series
Website – ViktoriArt.com

Viktoria Sorochinski is a Ukrainian-born artist who has lived and studied in Russia, Israel, and Canada prior to settling in New York City, where she acquired her Masters of Fine Arts in 2008. Since 2001 she has participated in various group and solo exhibitions and international photography festivals in Canada, USA, France, Italy, Russia, China, Georgia and Argentina. She is also a finalist and winner of several international photography competitions and awards including Lucie Award – IPA (Discovery of the Year), Magenta Foundation's Flash Forward, PDN Photo Annual, Voices Off Arles, ONWARD, Review Santa Fe, Descubrimientos PHE, BluePrint Fellowship, and Encuentros Abiertos. Her work is widely published in internationally acclaimed magazines, among which are British Journal of Photography, EYEMAZING, NY Times, PDN, GUP, Le Monde, BLINK Magazine, THE PHOTO/ARTVAS, Planeando Sobre BUE, AZART Photo, and many others, as well as in web portals worldwide.

Lucas Foglia, Alex with Gourd

Lucas Foglia, Alex with Gourd

Lucas Foglia

Alex with Gourd,
North Carolina, 2009
From the A Natural Order series
Website – LucasFoglia.com

Lucas Foglia was raised on a small family farm in Long Island and is currently based in San Francisco. A graduate of Brown University and the Yale School of Art, Lucas exhibits and publishes his photographs internationally. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Pilara Foundation and the Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Fine Art, and has been published in Aperture Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post Magazine, British Journal of Photography, Contact Sheet, and PDN’s 30. His first book, A Natural Order, is available from Nazraeli Press.

Aaron Schuman, Redwoods (4)

Aaron Schuman, Redwoods (4)

Aaron Schuman

Redwoods (4),
, 2011-12
From the Redwoods series
Website – AaronSchuman.com

Aaron Schuman is an American photographer, editor, writer and curator based in the United Kingdom. His photographic work is exhibited internationally, and he regularly contributes photography, articles, essays and interviews to a wide-range of publications, including Aperture, Foam Magazine, Photoworks, ArtReview, Modern Painters, Hotshoe International, British Journal of Photography, and more; he has also published writings in a number of recently released books, including Pieter Hugo: This Must Be the Place (Prestel, 2012), Photographs Not Taken (Daylight, 2012), and Hijacked 3 (Big City Press, 2012). In 2010, Schuman curated Whatever Was Splendid: New American Photographs, a principal exhibitions at the 2010 Fotofest Biennial (Houston, USA); in 2011 he curated Other I: Alec Soth, Wassink Lundgren, Viviane Sassen at Hotshoe Gallery (London, UK); and he is in the midst of curating In Appropriation for the Houston Center of Photography, opening in September 2012. Schuman is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Brighton and the Arts University College at Bournemouth. He is also the founder, director and editor of the online photography journal, SeeSaw Magazine.
 

Revelaciones: The History of the Latin American Photobook

Upwards of 150 photobooks published since 1920 from 11 Latin American countries are on view to the public in Revelaciones. Historia del fotolibro en Latinoamérica at the Ivorypress Space in Madrid (through July 14, 2012).

While publication of the photobook has been prolific in Latin America across these years, its history has gone largely undocumented. This exhibition, which is curated by Horacio Fernández, author of Aperture’s second so-called “book on books,” The Latin American Photobook (2011), the result of a four-year, cross-continental committee effort, offers visitors a hands-on opportunity to examine a unique and comprehensive survey of rich visual publishing. Books are arranged by the following themes: America before America, History and Propaganda, Urban Photography, Photo Essays, Artist’s Book, Photography and Literature and Contemporary Photography.

The publication of The Latin American Photobook, which followed the success of Aperture’s 2009 Japanese Photobooks of the 1960s and 1970s, is part of an ongoing effort to support the growing appreciation and connoisseurship of the photobook as an artistic form in it of itself. The text is reviewed by Photo-eye Magazine, The British Journal of Photography, and Memory in Latin America.

Spanish-speakers can find reviews of the exhibition in Madrid on El País.

Revelaciones. Historia del fotolibro en Latinoamérica
Exhibition on view:
Through July 14, 2012

Ivorypress Space
C/Comandante Zorita 48 – 46 28020
Madrid, Spain
+34-91-4490961

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • The National Press Photographers Association announce “The Best of Photojournalism 2012,” this week. For aspiring hopefuls, the Photo Brigade posts “10 Tips for Photojournalism Students,” and Phototuts+ shares an article on “Building a Narrative Through Photojournalism.” The British Journal of Photography reports that the Carmignac Gestion Foundation is currently calling for entries for its annual Photojournalism Award, which comes with a €50,000 grant.
  • New York Times‘ LENS blog profiles Binh Danh who works with a fascinating chemical-free alternative process known as chlorophyl printing–using sunlight to burn in monochrome images onto leaves, grass and other vegetation. His series “Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War” features a decade of work printing images of “suffering civilians, soldiers on patrol and the dead,” in an attempt to recapture the experience of that war.
  • A wide-ranging conversation about the ethics of conflict photography and how images are sold commercially has sprung up around the use of an image licensed to Lockheed Martin. Read Ron Haviv and VII responses to the initial criticism raised by Benjamin Chesterton of Duckrabbit, who takes issue with the use of a Haviv image commercially licensed by the arms manufacturer. Further commentary and assessment on the thorny issues of how to make, sell, and use — or not — images created during conflict are added by Michael ShawColin Pantall, and Stella Kramer
  • Photo District News posts “Favorite Sources of New Photography” Part 1 and Part 2, a feature in which they ask photo editors from publications like The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, New York, Time, The New Yorker, and many more including our own publisher Lesley A. Martin, where they find inspiration for new work.
  • What effect might increased scrutiny or transparency over digital image manipulation have on our visual culture? Poytner reports that a new software suite is in development by the former Adobe product manager for Photoshop that would detect the alteration of digital images. AdWeek explores what effect these attitudes might have on commercial photography in the wake of the pivotal ruling by the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus that a certain fashion ad was not “truthful and accurate” and thus a “public health hazard.”
  • More on Richard Misrach this week, whose monograph Golden Gate is soon to be reissued by Aperture on the occasion of the anniversary of the bridge, which turned 75 last Sunday. Time’s LightBox profiles “Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley,” on view at the High Museum from June 2, 2012, as does CNN Photos with a slightly different slideshow edit. The series features images from his other upcoming collaborative photobook with Kate Off, Petrochemical America, profiled by the Huffington Post in “Beautiful Ambivalence: The World Through the Lens of Richard Misrach.”
  • In exploring the future of photography, Hilde Van Gelder looks at its past in “What Has Photography Done?” on Fotomuseum Winterthur’s blog Still Searching. She outlines two dominant tracks–the “autonomous pictorial art,” that gets absorbed into the museum and the canon, and that which “comments on the social and economic reality in which we live and thus actively take[s] part in transformative social processes,”–and opens up a conversation on the public funding of institutions.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • The National Press Photographers Association announce “The Best of Photojournalism 2012,” this week. For aspiring hopefuls, the Photo Brigade posts “10 Tips for Photojournalism Students,” and Phototuts+ shares an article on “Building a Narrative Through Photojournalism.” The British Journal of Photography reports that the Carmignac Gestion Foundation is currently calling for entries for its annual Photojournalism Award, which comes with a €50,000 grant.
  • New York Times‘ LENS blog profiles Binh Danh who works with a fascinating chemical-free alternative process known as chlorophyl printing–using sunlight to burn in monochrome images onto leaves, grass and other vegetation. His series “Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War” features a decade of work printing images of “suffering civilians, soldiers on patrol and the dead,” in an attempt to recapture the experience of that war.
  • A wide-ranging conversation about the ethics of conflict photography and how images are sold commercially has sprung up around the use of an image licensed to Lockheed Martin. Read Ron Haviv and VII responses to the initial criticism raised by Benjamin Chesterton of Duckrabbit, who takes issue with the use of a Haviv image commercially licensed by the arms manufacturer. Further commentary and assessment on the thorny issues of how to make, sell, and use — or not — images created during conflict are added by Michael ShawColin Pantall, and Stella Kramer
  • Photo District News posts “Favorite Sources of New Photography” Part 1 and Part 2, a feature in which they ask photo editors from publications like The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, New York, Time, The New Yorker, and many more including our own publisher Lesley A. Martin, where they find inspiration for new work.
  • What effect might increased scrutiny or transparency over digital image manipulation have on our visual culture? Poytner reports that a new software suite is in development by the former Adobe product manager for Photoshop that would detect the alteration of digital images. AdWeek explores what effect these attitudes might have on commercial photography in the wake of the pivotal ruling by the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus that a certain fashion ad was not “truthful and accurate” and thus a “public health hazard.”
  • More on Richard Misrach this week, whose monograph Golden Gate is soon to be reissued by Aperture on the occasion of the anniversary of the bridge, which turned 75 last Sunday. Time’s LightBox profiles “Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley,” on view at the High Museum from June 2, 2012, as does CNN Photos with a slightly different slideshow edit. The series features images from his other upcoming collaborative photobook with Kate Off, Petrochemical America, profiled by the Huffington Post in “Beautiful Ambivalence: The World Through the Lens of Richard Misrach.”
  • In exploring the future of photography, Hilde Van Gelder looks at its past in “What Has Photography Done?” on Fotomuseum Winterthur’s blog Still Searching. She outlines two dominant tracks–the “autonomous pictorial art,” that gets absorbed into the museum and the canon, and that which “comments on the social and economic reality in which we live and thus actively take[s] part in transformative social processes,”–and opens up a conversation on the public funding of institutions.