Tag Archives: Bowling Green State University

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber

Record Player,
Boston, 2003
From the Countrypolitan series
Website – MatthewGamber.com

Matthew Gamber (b. 1977) holds a BFA from Bowling Green State University, and an MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts / Tufts University. Recent exhibitions include: Second Nature: Abstract Photography Then and Now, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012 The 2012 deCordova Biennial, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012; Flash Forward 2011 Exhibition, Magenta Foundation, Toronto, CA, 2011; The Sum of All Colors, Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York, 2011. Awards include: Traveling Fellowship, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2011; Humble Art Foundation, New Photography Grant, 2011; Grant Recipient, LEF Foundation, New England (awarded for Big RED & Shiny), 2007 & 2005.

Brandon Juhasz

Ohio photographer, Brandon Juhasz, is a combination of Dr. Frankenstein, Picasso in his cubist period, and photographic outlier. He received his BFA from Bowling
Green State University where he was trained in photography and painting and his work seeks to “dissect and understand the entrenched power of images and photography in our
culture and the changing nature of the photographic image”. I’m showing some selections from his project, American Bigfoot is Monkey Suit.

Brandon’s work has been
included in many juried and curated exhibitions both locally and nationally
including the Hagedorn Gallery in Atlanta for the Atlanta Celebrates Photography
festival and MOCA Cleveland.
My work is an exploration of the power and saturation of our image based culture. I explore the concept of photography in contemporary society and its fluid and ubiquitous nature.  Photography is now an integral part of living. No longer a curiosity or hobby, photography is as common as driving a car. How does this affect us? How does it affect our ideals and worldview, our self-awareness or our memory? By using images found on the Internet to make new worlds I employ narrative image making to explore failure, desire and life in a post memory, post private hyper documented world.

Review Santa Fe: David Emitt Adams

Over the next month, I will be sharing the work of photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  I was fortunate enough to be a pre-juror for this event. 
Arizona photographer, David Emitt Adams has a wonderful project that pulls us back and forth through photographic history.  Exquisitely presented, his project, 36 Exposures, shines a light on what we have lost in the digital world–the tactile presence of objects that surround film, and the creation of work that does not require a battery or outlet.  His work focuses on historical media and uses that media to create an informed contemporary dialogue about photography’s past and present.

David received a BFA from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and an MFA from Arizona State University.  His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and
abroad. David was selected for the prestigious Lens Culture
International Exposure Award 2011
and most recently, was awarded the Freestyle
Crystal Apple Award
for Outstanding Achievement in Black and White
Photography.  Within the last year,
David was awarded the Nathan Cummings Foundation $5000 travel grant that funded
a trip to France and England.  This
opportunity enabled him to investigate the resurgence of antiquated processes
at its source and their application in contemporary photography. Currently he is working on two new bodies of work as an
Artist-in-Residence at Art Intersection in Gilbert, Arizona. 

Images from 36 Exposures
As an artist who is enthralled with photography, I gain
pleasure from exploring its past and discovering how that past relates to where
the medium is today.  Photography
is in the era of megapixels and I have made the conscious decision to embrace
the processes and elements of display from
photography’s past.  This is
not to say that I have rejected the digital era. 
I, too, own a digital camera, but have chosen to conduct a
constant search to understand everything photography is, and could be.

In the piece 36
Exposures, I have used 35mm film canisters that were discarded by my
“Introduction to Photography” students as a base to hold their portraits.  I employed a labor-intensive, 19th
century, chemical photographic procedure known as the wet plate collodion
process to make the students’ photographs on the very film canisters that
played a crucial role in their initial understanding of photography.  The canisters and the process I used
speak of the evolving nature of photography, representation, and culture.  By mining the history of photography, I
can find the relevance of my work today. 

Matthew Gamber

One of the best rewards of being in Boston last week was meeting photographers.  I’ve been a fan of Matthew Gamber and his compelling imagery that challenges us to rethink how we see, think about and perceive color, so it was great to finally put a name to a face at the Flash Forward Festival.

Matthew holds a BFA from Bowling Green State University and an MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University.  His star is on the rise as his work seems to be everywhere: included in the 2012 deCordova Biennial, the the Abstract Photography Then and Now exhibition at the deCordova, at the Flash Forward 2011 Exhibition, and last year at the Sasha Wolf Gallery in New York.  He has also been granted numerous awards and fellowships, and just got off the plane from Santa Fe, where he attended Review Santa Fe.

Matthew’s new project, Any Color You Like, is a bit like losing the sense of  taste right as you are about to bite into something you have been looking forward to eating, and the expectation of that enjoyment usually comes from the memory of having eaten it before.  By removing the memory and one of the senses, the experience changes. Matthew’s images look at objects that we have traditionally seen in color and that speak to the idea of color, and force us to see and think about them anew.  It’s a terrific project that challenges our perceptions, pays homage to an era where all objects were captured in black and white, but also creates tension (the bird image particularly) where the mind leads one to wonder about the image in color.  

The photographs in Any Color You Like are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black–and–white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.

Brandon Juhasz, Snowy

Brandon Juhasz, Snowy

Brandon Juhasz

Snowy,
, 2011
Website – BrandonJuhasz.com

Brandon Juhasz is an artist living in Cleveland Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from Bowling Green State University. Trained in photography and painting his work seeks to dissect and understand the entrenched power of images and photography in our culture and the changing nature of the photographic image. His work has been included in many juried and curated exhibitions both locally and nationally including the Hagedorn Gallery in Atlanta and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland. He also was featured on the popular photography blog Lenscratch and as a contender in the 2011 edition of the international photo competition Hey Hot Shot.