Tag Archives: Bookshops Online

New — Lens Culture Curated Online Photobook Shop

We love photobooks, and whenever we can, we browse and buy at our local bookshops. We also shop online for those titles that are hard to find. Now there is a simple way for you to help support Lens Culture while shopping for those hard-to-find photobooks.

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If you shop on Amazon for photo books, camera equipment, gifts, or anything else at all, please consider using this link to Amazon. Lens Culture will earn a small commission on everything you purchase, and that will help us a lot.

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You can find more than 100 photobook reviews on Lens Culture, and we’ve just created an easy way for you to browse and shop right here for a lot of the books we like. We’ll be adding new reviews and new titles as often as we can. Cheers!

Surface to space. Maths, computers and the internet bring new life to the art of origami

Most of us are familiar with the art of paper folding, perhaps as an amusing pastime with brightly coloured paper, writes Marian Bantjes, a kind of parlour trick or children’s game. To those a bit more aware, origami has intersected with graphic design mostly as a form of three-dimensional illustration – which is one of the ways that paper folders are able to make a living. But a little investigation into the process of construction, and the developments that have occurred over the past quarter-century promise something more intriguing than a delightful puzzle. As with graphic design there is beauty in simplicity, as well as surprising complexity below the surface.

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What most properly defines origami is the linear fold – a complex mental exercise in compaction and extrusion.

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The most whimsical forms reveal gridwork similar to architecture or engineering design, restraints that give origami its allure.

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This is an extract from Marian Bantjes’ ‘Surface to Space’ in Eye 67 (Spring 2008). Read the full text of the article here.

Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It’s available from all good design bookshops and online at the Eye shop, where you can buy subscriptions, back issues and single copies of the latest issue. For a visual sample, see Eye before you buy on Issuu.

Cover story. New trade version of monograph celebrating the inventor of LP design

The first illustrated album cover – for ‘albums’ of 78rpm records – was designed in 1940 by Alex Steinweiss, art director at Columbia Records.

The 94-year-old Steinweiss rarely receives the recognition given to Paul Rand or Lester Beall, widely considered to be among the form-givers of American Modernism, but he was just as much a pioneer of corporate branding insofar as he gave a major recording company a distinctive identity.

You can now read the full text of Steven Heller’s Reputations interview with Steinweiss in Eye 76, the music design special issue.

In 2009, Taschen published the literally massive Alex Steinweiss: The Inventor of the Modern Album Cover (top) an exhaustive survey of his music work and other graphic design. At 422 pages, measuring 34cm by 28.3cm, it is possibly the largest design monograph ever published. Taschen has now made the previously limited-editionbook available in a more affordable trade version.

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It was Steinweiss who, in the early 1950s, after designing hundreds of packages, posters and catalogues for Columbia, created the paperboard LP cover to protect and market the latest revolution in music delivery. In the process, he defined the visual identity of recorded music for decades to come.

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Alex Steinweiss, The Inventor of the Modern Album Cover
Hardcover, 420pp. £44.99 (Taschen).

Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It’s available from all good design bookshops and online at the Eye shop, where you can buy subscriptions, back issues (including Eye 76 and single copies of the latest issue. For a visual sample, see Eye before you buy on Issuu. Eye 79 is out any moment.

Critique: French connections. Back Cover signals an allegiance to graphic design as a serious endeavour

In his latest Web-only Critique, Rick Poynor looks at the French graphic design and typography magazine Back Cover:‘Any graphic design magazine with an international outlook confronts a huge array of possible subjects. In the seven or eight features per issue published so far, Back Cover has signalled a firm allegiance to rigorous European typography and to visual communication as an essentially serious social and cultural endeavour. Its design by the editors’ studio, deValence – modernist with a few whimsical touches – embodies these apparently resurgent values.’

See ‘French connections’ on the Eye website.

Below: back cover of Back Cover no. 4 and spreads.

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For more information see Back Cover’s website, editions-b42.com/back-cover.

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Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It’s available from all good design bookshops and online at the Eye shop. For a taste of no. 78, see Eye before you buy on Issuu.