Tag Archives: Bangladesh

Pictures of the Week: October 26 – November 2

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From the devastation brought by Hurricane Sandy and Eid al-Adha celebrations around the world to the final week of campaigning for the 2012 U.S. presidential election and a suspected smuggler’s jeep perched atop the U.S.-Mexico border fence, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Pictures of the Week: September 28 – October 5

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From the U.S. presidential debate in Denver and a ferry disaster in Hong Kong to Europe’s unbelievable Ryder Cup comeback in Illinois and a tiger cub at theShanghai Zoo, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

Photo News: Diemar/Noble Photography and Rhubarb-Rhubarb host The Gathering event tonight in London with a photo tombola

The Gathering, an event jointly organised by Diemar/Noble Photography and Rhubarb-Rhubarb, takes place tonight from 6-9pm at Diemar/Noble.

For one night only, images donated by participating photographers including Brian Griffin, Martin Parr, Emily-Jane Major, Michael Donald, Laura Pannack and Zed Nelson will be on show at the Diemar/Noble gallery space. Prints have been donated by image makers from the UK, USA, Spain, Italy, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Australia and Bangladesh.

Participants pick a numbered ticket from a tombola and receive the corresponding numbered print as well as a copy of the event catalogue. “This gives you the opportunity to own a print by a world famous or an emerging artist for an investment of just £50″. The event is a fundraiser not a private view.

Money raised from the event is to support the work of Rhubarb-Rhubarb as “it moves into a digital future”. Not exactly sure what this means, in terms of what the money raised is for, specifically – money to make a transition and get things online?

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Filed under: Photographers, Photography Auction Tagged: contemporary photography, Diemar/Noble Photography, london, photo auction, Rhubarb-Rhubarb, The Gathering

Pictures of the Week: March 9 — March 16

From the conflict in Afghanistan and a tragic bus accident in Switzerland to Purim celebrations in Israel and the one-year anniversary of the Japanese tsunami, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Photo Show Naseeb: Trafficked by Sonal Kantaria opens at Next Level Projects London

© Sonal Kantaria, Asha, photo courtesy of the photographer

The Roaming Eye (tRE) has away from internet and wi-fi connections and has instead been experiencing just being, and waiting for serendipity to highlight work. While in Sri Lanka tRE attended a fantastic talk at the Colombo Art Biennale with Bangladeshi photographer, activist and curator Shahidul Alam in conversation with Sanjana Hattotuwa editor of Ground Views – an independent  citizen journalism website based in Sri Lanka. More of the talk in a later post, but tRE urges readers to  expand your horizons globally and take a look at the websites linked to above. Ground Views is a stellar example of citizen journalism at its best.

Back to the photo show. An email arrived from London regarding a photo show Naseeb: Trafficked by Sonal Kantaria about “forced prostitution and the trafficking of girls from India and Bangladesh”. On show are a series of 12 Polaroids, two of which are shown here, documenting “young Indian and Bangladeshi women who have been kidnapped, tricked or sold by their families into forced prostitution, later rescued or escaped and now currently living in protected accommodation in Mumbai.

“Naseeb means ‘fate’ or ‘luck’ in Hindi.

“The protective homes managed by the Rescue Foundation form the backdrop to Sonal Kantaria’s series of portraits, a short video work featuring the perspectives of those trafficked women, and a map piece illustrating some of the now well-known trafficking routes in South Asia. In doing so, the work brings into sharp focus the gender, economic and class disenfranchisement resulting in Indian and Bangladeshi women being forced into the flesh trade.” From the press release.

The show opened to the public yesterday at Next Level Projects in London and runs until 25 March. The Roaming Eye has yet to see the show but will go next week when back on UK soil.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Shows Tagged: Bangladesh, Ground Views, India, Naseeb: Trafficked, Next Level Projects, photo show, Rescue Foundation, Sanjana Hattotuwa, Shahidul Alam, Sonal Kantaria

Colombo Art Biennale 2012 Schedule of Talks and Conversations 15-19 February

Beware of the critic whose reputation depends on the power to impress the public with a semblance of knowledge, and the artist who attempts to do the same with skill and technical swagger. An artists’ perspective, see Gallery Talk 16 February Critique versus Criticism

This looks like a timely talk topic and one that’s sure to get us all thinking about our roles – as both critics/reviewers and art producers. It’s also important to challenge the taste makers and gatekeepers in the arts, especially those who like to dazzle and, sometimes, befuddle with language games and (apparent) knowledge. Also, to the artists who place technical virtuosity above all else.

As part of Hotshoe Blog supporting the Colombo Art Biennalee (CAB) 2012, the Roaming Eye (tRE) – who has been travelling off shore looking at all creatures great and small – is delighted to share the talks and conversations scheduled for the festival. It’s an exciting and interesting line up with international and local artists and curators contributing to a diverse range of topics. The schedule is still evolving, so keep checking in as relevant updates will be posted. However, The Roaming Eye will be at the biennale for the 18 and 19 February and will be reporting from the festival, talking to some of the photographers and visual artists and attending a couple of the talks on those days.

Of particular interest to readers of this blog is photojournalist, activist, writer and curator Dr Shahidul Alam from Bangladesh. The Roaming Eye hopes to do a short interview with him for the blog, so look out for it as a short podcast especially if you’re unfamiliar with his work.

It’s always good to discover new things and search for fresh perspectives – one of the hallmarks of Hotshoe and its tagline. But we’re also aware that it’s easy to say we do it but the proof is in actually getting out there and doing it – not just saying we do. Otherwise, we’re just blowing hot air. Plus, in an increasingly global world, a global approach is needed to stave of Eurocentrism and Northern-America bias in the photography and arts worlds.

See more for details of some of the scheduled talks.

Thursday 16 February 2012
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “Why a Biennale?” A conversation with the BECOMING 2012 organisers.

Presented to the public by Neil Butler, UK Co-Director CAB 2012 (Keynote), Roman Berka, Suresh Jeyaram – Curators, CAB 2012, Annoushka Hempel, Festival Founder & Director, Jagath Weerasinghe, Co-Director

An introductory talk also featuring the Biennale Curators – Roman Berka and Suresh Jeyaram – to set the scope of the range of works being presented and the topics covered in Talks to come. Aimed at participating artists, students and the general public.
Venue: Park Street Hotel, Park Street, Colombo 2 (NOT TICKETED)

Session 2 – 4.00 – 6.00pm – Harry Peris, The ’43 Group and the Sapumal Foundation.

Gallery Talk – 2.00 – 3.00pm – “Critique versus Critcism”
Speaker: Leo Pasqualge, Artist BECOMING 2012.

“Beware of the critic whose reputation depends on the power to impress the public with a semblance of knowledge, and the artist who attempts to do the same with skill and technical swagger” – An artists’ perspective.
Venue: JDA Perera Gallery (NOT TICKETED)

Friday 17 February 2012
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “Building Bridges – The South Asian Context”
Speaker: Suresh Jeyaram, Curator BECOMING 2012

“Sethu Samudram” is a three-year collaborative art project and a dialog-making platform between Theertha International Artists Collective, Colombo, Sri Lanka and 1Shanthi Road in Bangalore, India, bridging art, history and human relations. “Sethu Samudram” is the name of the mythical bridge found in Ramayana, meaning the bridge across the ocean. This bridge connects Sri Lanka and India.
Venue: Nuga Gama, Cinnamon Grand Hotel, Colombo 3

Saturday 18 February 2012
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “The Debate – Does great art require great skill?”

Panel: Cecil Balmond UK/Sri Lanka, Shahidul Alam, Bangladesh and Biennale artists. Dr Shahidul Alam is a world-renowned photojournalist, activist and writer from Bangladesh who will be at the festival. His profile is on the CAB website

Yes or No? an interactive debate on the benchmarks to becoming a great artist. The audience will be invited to vote.
Venue: Barefoot Gallery

Photo of Shahidul Alam

Session 2 – 2.30pm – 4.00pm – “Art as a Witness”
Speaker: Shahidul Alam, Bangladesh

Faced with imposed situations of repression, cultural activists have had to find new ways of resistance. This has required documentation, articulation and tools of creative expression to deal with injustice in many forms. By using both new and traditional media, as well as the networking ability of social media, lean and tenacious campaigns are formed that insisted on being heard and bent on achieving justice.

The presentation attempts to show how, by resisting not only the formal entities that have usurped power, but also the cultural norms that attempt to pigeon-hole cultural practice in terms of ‘fine art’, have tried to ensure that our ‘art’ does not limit itself to admiration in a gallery. It breathes the gunpowder laden air of street battles with police, the dank vapours of the factory floor and pervades the silence of patriarchal inner chamber.
Venue: Barefoot Gallery

Session 3 – 4.30pm – 6.00pm – “Art and Architecture”

Sunday 19 February
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “What now – after the ‘90s Trend?”
Speaker: Jagath Weerasinghe,Sri Lanka

Art of the 1990s marked a turning point in Sri Lankan modernist art. It brought in a narrative turn to the modernist art and pushed it beyond modernist aesthetics. In this presentation Jagath Weerasinghe will talk on this change and attempt at addressing the possibilities and limitations that the 90’s trend brought in.
Venue: CASA Colombo, Galle Road, Colombo 4

Session 2 – 4.00 – 5.30pm – “Art and an expanded Museum Concept”
Speaker: Roman Berka, Museum In Progress, Vienna, Austria

Daily newspapers, magazines, billboards, television, information screens, building façades or the safety curtain in the Vienna State Opera House have been used temporarily for media- and site-specific contemporary art. Outside the walls of the traditional White Cube, Museum in Progress is active in a wide-ranging social environment and is devoted to an avant-garde concept of art that includes other social systems besides the traditional artistic milieu. In this way it elaborates on the artistic concepts of the 1960s and 1970s, creating a virtual “museum of the twenty-first century” that grows in the public sphere like a social sculpture. Philosophy, science, politics and other aspects of social life are reflected in the contributions, which encourage socially relevant discussion on the basis of an expanded conception of art.
Venue: SKKY Bar, 4th Floor, 42 Sir Mohamad Macan Markar Mw., Colombo 3

Session 3 – “Art as a Social Sculpture”

Filed under: Artist Talks, Documentary photography, Photographers, Visual Artists Tagged: artist’s talks, Bangladesh, Colombo Art Biennale 2012, Colombo Art Biennial, Dr Shahidul Alam, photojournalism, Shahidul Alam, Sri Lanka, the Roaming Eye

Pictures of the Week, January 27 – February 3

From deadly clashes in Syria and Egypt, to the first anniversary of the Tahrir square uprising and the walk-up to this year’s Super Bowl, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

The Blood of Bird and Beast: The Persistence of Animal Sacrifice

Animal sacrifice is older than history. Human beings have slaughtered birds and livestock throughout the ages in attempt to propitiate the gods—to alter fate, to enhance fortune, to pay for sins. One of the great hymns of the Rigveda is that of the Horse Sacrifice, which only a king can perform. The rituals continue to this day, as the photographs in this collection show: in the Muslim and Hindu worlds, as well as in Judaism. The first murder related in the bible stems from jealousy over sacrifice. Cain’s sacrifice of vegetables did not please God as much as his brother’s sacrifice of animals—and so Cain slew Abel.

Of the world’s great faiths, only Buddhism and Daoism eschew rituals of animal sacrifice, indeed, the taking of any life. Indeed, according to legend, one of the Buddha’s previous incarnations gave up his life to feed a hungry tiger. The various Christian sects and denominations very rarely perform animal sacrifices. But the very Catholic societies of Spain and Latin America still hold bullfights, which are descended from pagan animal sacrifices. And, of course, at the heart of Christianity is a sacrament that is essentially a human sacrifice.

Checkout LightBox’s Animal Magic: Curious Critters. The fourth installment of recent news images that reveal the endless wonders of the animal kingdom.