Tag Archives: Audience Members

A Year of Photographers in the Picture

A little shy of a year agowith the world’s attention focused on a change of power in North Koreaa photo of Kim Jung Il’s funeral, released by KCNA (North Korean Central News Agency), sparked controversy. The image had been manipulatedless for overt political ends, more for visual harmony. Blog Submission . The photo’s offending elements, photoshopped from the image, were not political adversaries or top secret information, but a group of photographers who had disturbed the aesthetic order of the highly orchestrated and meticulously planned occasion.

KCNA/Reuters

Dec. 28, 2011. A limousine carrying a portrait of late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il leads his funeral procession in Pyongyang.

In an age where seemingly every occasion is documented through photography from every conceivable anglean estimated 380 billion photographs will be taken this year aloneit’s not only North Korean bureaucrats who are wrestling to keep hoards of other photographers out of their pictures.

Photographers frequently appear in news photographs made by others. Banks of cameras greet celebrities and public figures at every event; cell phones held high by admirers become a tribute in lights, but a distraction to the viewer. Amateurs and professionals, alike, appear in backgrounds and in foregrounds of images made at both orchestrated events and in more candid moments. squido lense . The once-invisible professional photographer’s process has been laid bare.

On occasion, photographers even purposefully make their fellow photographers the subject of their pictures. The most difficult picture to take, it seems, is one without the presence of another photographer either explicitly or implicitly in the frame.

Everyone wants to record their own version of realityironically, it turns out, because by distracting oneself with a camera, it’s easy to miss the true experience of a moment. At a recent Jack White concert, the guitarist requested that audience members stop trying to take their own photos. “The bigger idea,” his label noted in a statement, “is for people to experience the event with their own eyes and not watch an entire show through a tiny screen in their hand. We have every show photographed professionally and the pictures are available from Jack White’s website shortly after to download for free.”

The abundance of camera phones and inexpensive digital cameras has changed the photographic landscape in countless and still-incompletely understood ways, and it’s not just the North Korean government trying to find ways around the hoards of photographers making their way into everyone else’s shots. Here, TIME looks back on the past year to highlight an increasingly common phenomenon: the photographer in the picture.

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Talk American

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Stephanie Barber, Still from Dogs, 2000, Image courtesy of the artist


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | 6:00pm | MoCPVideo Playlist is a recurring series of one-night public video screenings guest curated in response to MoCP exhibitions. squido lense . Fotografia . Jesse Malmed will present a program in conjunction with Peripheral Views that includes a live, participatory performance during the screening.Talk barely, talk breathily, talk American. Fotografia . The works in this screening address the complexity of language and the myriad ways it shapes our experience of reality. Any place as big as America, with as many voices as America, has a multitude of expressions that exist at the periphery. This program brings the following to a center: a Sci-Fi CAPTCHA tale, what Microsoft Word found wrong with the Unabomber, how jargon becomes gibberish, a report from the out-of-bodied, a political speech about political speech, and finally, real talk from a pair of paper-mache dogs. Following the screening, Malmed will present selections from The Body Electronic, an ongoing and evolving series of participatory video-based performances. Malmed offers a visual, polyvocal, and interactive experience that engages audience members in dizzying, surprising, and humorous ways.The screening features the work of Joe Sandler, Peter Rose, Peggy Ahwesh, Doug Hall, Gabrielle De Vietri, Stephanie Barber, and Jesse Malmed.This event is free and open to the public.


Filter%20Banner%20BlogMoCP | 600 S. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Talk American

Video%20Playlist%20image.jpg
Stephanie Barber, Still from Dogs, 2000, Image courtesy of the artist


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | 6:00pm | MoCPVideo Playlist is a recurring series of one-night public video screenings guest curated in response to MoCP exhibitions. Jesse Malmed will present a program in conjunction with Peripheral Views that includes a live, participatory performance during the screening.Talk barely, talk breathily, talk American. The works in this screening address the complexity of language and the myriad ways it shapes our experience of reality. Any place as big as America, with as many voices as America, has a multitude of expressions that exist at the periphery. directory submission . This program brings the following to a center: a Sci-Fi CAPTCHA tale, what Microsoft Word found wrong with the Unabomber, how jargon becomes gibberish, a report from the out-of-bodied, a political speech about political speech, and finally, real talk from a pair of paper-mache dogs. link pyramid . Following the screening, Malmed will present selections from The Body Electronic, an ongoing and evolving series of participatory video-based performances. Malmed offers a visual, polyvocal, and interactive experience that engages audience members in dizzying, surprising, and humorous ways.The screening features the work of Joe Sandler, Peter Rose, Peggy Ahwesh, Doug Hall, Gabrielle De Vietri, Stephanie Barber, and Jesse Malmed.This event is free and open to the public.


Filter%20Banner%20BlogMoCP | 600 S. carrera de fotografia . Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

The Dutch Photobook with Frits Gierstberg at Aperture

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Good photobooks require having good photographs. But good photobooks need more than that. Photobooks, when done well, are not merely collections of photographs. They are pieces of art in their own right, which means that the contributions of the non-photographers are crucial.

–Joerg Colberg, in his review of The Dutch Photobook (Aperture 2012)

This Wednesday, June 13, 2012, Frits Gierstberg, curator of the Netherlands Photomuseum, comes to Aperture Gallery to speak on the important collaborations between graphic designers, printers, and Dutch photographers that have earned Dutch photobooks so much praise.

Gierstberg, who co-authored Aperture’s latest “book on books,” The Dutch Photobook: A Thematic Selection from 1945 Onwards along with Rik Suermondt, will be explaining some methodology behind his selection in the text, and discussing not only those  books included, but omitted as well.

We’re most excited for the hands-on reception after the presentation during which audience members will be offered a special viewing of a selection of contemporary Dutch photobooks. Joining Gierstberg will be special guest Dutch photographers featured in the book, Jacqueline Hassink, author of the 2009 Aperture monograph Car Girls, and Dana Lixenberg, whose monographs Jeffersonville Indiana and Last Days of Sishmaref won Best Dutch Book Design in 2005 and 2008, respectively.

Attendees will also receive complementary copies of Aperture’s The Photobook Review Issue 002, edited by publisher Markus Schaden, which features extensive coverage of photobook studies and photobook dummy-making.

Read Joerg Colberg’s full review of The Dutch Photobook on Concientious. The work has also been reviewed on Photo-Eye Blog, where you can flip through a few spreads as well.

The Dutch Photobook: Presentation and reception with Frits Gierstberg
Wednesday, June 13, 2012
6:30 p.m.

FREE

Aperture Gallery
547 West 27th Street, 4th floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • Find May Day photos from around the world at Boston’s The Big Picture Show, New York TimesLensBlog, and LA TimesFramework. Time‘s LightBox also offers “Resources for Photographers Covering Protests,” a bit of a distillation of what the ACLU has up on their website. In addition this week, the National Press Photographers Association and other press groups “call on Justice Department to protect right to record,” pointing out that more than 70 people have been arrested documenting Occupy protests since last September.
  • The New Yorker‘s PhotoBooth shares brilliant photos from the eight night performance run of electronic music and Krautrock pioneers Kraftwerk at MoMA last week– those shows that sold out in a blink of an eye, crashing ticket servers. The featured photos were taken not by concert photographers, but audience members with their cell phones who shared on Instagram, Facebook and Flickr, including one by their pop music critic Sasha Frere-Jones, who wrote for the magazine this week on the band’s legacy.
  • Daidō Moriyama, who is interviewed by Ivan Vartanian in Aperture issue 203, was awarded the Lifetime Achievement award during ICP’s Infinity Award 2012 ceremony this past Wednesday, La Lettre De La Photographie reports, posting a gallery of his images. Be sure to check out the Daidō Moriyama pop-up library, on display at the ICP Library until May 23, 2012, and watch videos from Moriyama’s 2011 PRINTING SHOW–TKY at Aperture, a recreation of his 1974 ad hoc photobook-making performance of the same title. Moriyama also has his first solo museum exhibition, Fracture: Daido Moriyama, on view at LACMA through July 31, 2012, LA Times‘ Framework reports.
  • Ben Lowy, the “Hipstamatic Journalist,” an ardent defender of cell phone photography according to a New York Times profile and Q&A on LensBlog, also won an Infinity Award this week for his work in photojournalism. Soon, the Times reports, Hipstamatic will release a Ben Lowy Lens filter. This week, software developer jag.gr also released the 645 Pro camera app for the iPhone, Rob Galbraith reports, which appeals to advanced photographers and can capture TIFF images, features real-time shutter speed and aperture readouts, a live histogram, a choice of spot or multi-zone metering, as well as focus, exposure, and white balance lock. PhotoShelter Blog shares a lengthy post on “Why Instagram is Terrible for Photographers, and Why You Should Use It,” while APhotoEditor explores some of the many licensing issues with the social media sites through which these images are shared.
  • Read about the long strange saga of student photojournalist Andy Duann’s ‘bear falling out of a tree‘ photo which was went viral last week according to Poytner, eventually being picked up by the Associated Press (we first noticed it on WSJ‘s Photo Journal).  Duann had been considering legal action against his school, the University of Colorado, for distributing the photo without compensating him, until they acknowledged that he retained the copyright and announced they would no longer demand copyright from their students in the future.
  • MediaStorm share two videos this week that live up to their column titled, “Worth Watching.” First, watch Ian Ruhter’s SILVER & LIGHT clip about his–literally–truck-sized traveling camera. Then watch Jeff Harris’ sometimes-heart-wrenching video on his project collecting 4,748 daily self-portraits–and counting. MediaStorm also draws our attention to Aday, “a unique photographic event,” scheduled for May 15, 2012, in which countless people from all different backgrounds use any camera they can get access to and submit photos to create a massive historical document–”A Day in the World,” which will be published as a book in October 2012. Sign up today.
  • Andy Adam’s Flak Photo is teaming up with Tom Griggs’ fototazo next week to host an online community conversation focused on essays from Gerry Badger’s recently published The Pleasures of Good Photographs (Aperture 2010). We’re looking forward to Monday, May 7, 2012, which is when the discussion kicks off with the essay, “Literate, Authoritative, Transcendent: Walker Evans’s American Photographs.”