Tag Archives: Artist In Residence

Caleb Charland, Vinegar Battery

Caleb Charland, Vinegar Battery

Caleb Charland

Vinegar Battery,
, 2011
Website – CalebCharland.com

Growing up in rural Maine, Caleb Charland spent much of his childhood helping his father remodel their family home. These experiences instilled an awareness of the potential for the creative use of materials, and the ability to fabricate his visions. Charland earned a BFA in photography with departmental honors from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in 2004, an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as a Trustees Fellow in 2010, and was a participant at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2009. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is in the Collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Progressive Collection, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Charland currently lives in Maine and works at the Maine College of Art as an artist in residence.

Kirk Crippens

It is rare to gain access to a world behind bars, but photographer Kirk Crippens achieved that task in 2008, and since then, he has been granted one hour with the prisoners on an annual basis.  That access has resulted in the project, Hidden Population, a series of portraits on San Quentin inmates.
Kirk is one of the most prolific photographers making work today, and one of the most generous.  Much of his work explores The Great Recession, with projects that look at foreclosure, job loss, and the collapse of auto dealerships. Kirk had an early start with photography, inspired by
his grandfather who kept a darkroom in his closet. In college, he
ventured into photojournalism, interning at prestigious newspapers around the
US. Based in San Francisco since 2000 he focused his efforts on personal
projects. He has exhibited widely in solo and group shows,  he was  named Top 50 Photographer in Photolucida’s Critical Mass in 2010 and 2011, nominated for the 2011–2013 Eureka Fellowship Program, nominated for Photolucida’s book prize, and exhibited in the
International Photography Festival in Lishui, China. He is currently the artist
in residence at RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco and 2013 he will be the Artist in Residence at Newspace
Center for Photography in Portland, Oregon.
Images from Hidden Population

I was in the midst of a long process of photographing portraits inside San Quentin in May 2011 when the Supreme Court declared the overcrowding in California’s prison system unconstitutional and ordered the population lowered by 133,000 to achieve 137.5% capacity. My project began in 2008, when I petitioned the prison to allow me inside with my cameras. A year and a half later I was granted limited access and began a series of brief one-hour visits with the men. I was allowed inside once a year between 2009-12.

When I first arrived at San Quentin with my cameras, the prisoners were seated facing one another in a circle of metal chairs arranged for a gardening class. Fluorescent lights reflected off the tile floor onto their faces. The warden was present and guards were scattered throughout the room. I was given 45 minutes. Rushed and constricted, I struggled to find resonance. A man with a hand-sewn cap caught my attention, and I isolated him in my viewfinder. As I took in the scene, it occurred to me that I could capture individual qualities of the men from behind while they were participating in the class. By approaching it this way, I could also reference the hidden aspect of the lives they lead, locked up inside the prison.

When invited back in January 2012, I decided to try a different approach that included bringing a tripod and directly asking the men to pose for me. I set up my tripod in front of a cinder block wall in the San Quentin cafeteria and began asking the men if I could take their portrait. Most seemed honored; a few declined. It wasn’t how the guards or warden expected me to work, and I could feel the tension. The guards whispered and huddled together in the corner. Less than an hour later they asked me to leave and ushered me out. Although the series I’m submitting feels complete, I continue to be interested in prison culture and the political issues affecting it. I hope to visit again.

Nicole Jean Hill, Highway 14

Nicole Jean Hill, Highway 14

Nicole Jean Hill

Highway 14,
Ucross, Wyoming, 2011
From the Artifacts & Incidents series
Website – NicoleJeanHill.com

Nicole Jean Hill was born in Toledo, Ohio. She received her BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her photographs have been exhibited in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Australia, including solo exhibitions at the Blue Sky Gallery (Portland, OR), Gallery 44 (Toronto, ON) and The Front (New Orleans, LA). She has been an artist-in-residence at the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming, The Center for Land Use Interpretation in Wendover, Utah, and the Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, OR. Hill currently resides in Eureka, CA and is an associate professor in the department of art at Humboldt State University.

Review Santa Fe: David Emitt Adams

Over the next month, I will be sharing the work of photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  I was fortunate enough to be a pre-juror for this event. 
Arizona photographer, David Emitt Adams has a wonderful project that pulls us back and forth through photographic history.  Exquisitely presented, his project, 36 Exposures, shines a light on what we have lost in the digital world–the tactile presence of objects that surround film, and the creation of work that does not require a battery or outlet.  His work focuses on historical media and uses that media to create an informed contemporary dialogue about photography’s past and present.

David received a BFA from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and an MFA from Arizona State University.  His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and
abroad. David was selected for the prestigious Lens Culture
International Exposure Award 2011
and most recently, was awarded the Freestyle
Crystal Apple Award
for Outstanding Achievement in Black and White
Photography.  Within the last year,
David was awarded the Nathan Cummings Foundation $5000 travel grant that funded
a trip to France and England.  This
opportunity enabled him to investigate the resurgence of antiquated processes
at its source and their application in contemporary photography. Currently he is working on two new bodies of work as an
Artist-in-Residence at Art Intersection in Gilbert, Arizona. 

Images from 36 Exposures
As an artist who is enthralled with photography, I gain
pleasure from exploring its past and discovering how that past relates to where
the medium is today.  Photography
is in the era of megapixels and I have made the conscious decision to embrace
the processes and elements of display from
photography’s past.  This is
not to say that I have rejected the digital era. 
I, too, own a digital camera, but have chosen to conduct a
constant search to understand everything photography is, and could be.

In the piece 36
Exposures, I have used 35mm film canisters that were discarded by my
“Introduction to Photography” students as a base to hold their portraits.  I employed a labor-intensive, 19th
century, chemical photographic procedure known as the wet plate collodion
process to make the students’ photographs on the very film canisters that
played a crucial role in their initial understanding of photography.  The canisters and the process I used
speak of the evolving nature of photography, representation, and culture.  By mining the history of photography, I
can find the relevance of my work today. 

Scott Conarroe, BMW

Scott Conarroe, BMW

Scott Conarroe

BMW,
Point Bridget, Alaska, 2010
From the By Land, By Sea series
Website – ScottConarroe.com

Scott Conarroe (b. 1974) has a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art and Design and an MFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. He has been artist-in-residence at Light Work (US), FLACC (BE), and Villa Strauli (CH), and a Canadian Armed Forces Civilian Artist in the Arctic. Scott was included among PDN's 30 in 2010 and awarded the 2011 Duke and Duchess of York Prize for Photography. His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Bank of Montreal. Scott is sessional faculty at ECUAD and represented by the Stephen Bulger Gallery. He is based out of Keremeos, British Columbia and Toronto.
 

Jennifer Greenburg, His First Haircut

Jennifer Greenburg, His First Haircut

Jennifer Greenburg

His First Haircut,
, 2011
From the Revising History series
Website – JenniferGreenburg.com

Jennifer Greenburg is an Assistant Professor of Photography at Indiana University Northwest. She holds a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA from The University of Chicago. She was an artist in residence at Light Work, Syracuse, in 2005 and is a recipient of an Illinois Arts Council Grant and two Community Arts Assistance Programs. Her work is part of the permanent collection of The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Light Work, and the National Gallery of Ontario. Recent exhibitions include the 2011 International Lishui China Photography Exhibition of Distinguished Curators and Infinite Mirror, both of which will be traveling until 2016.  A full-length monograph, The Rockabillies, was published by the Center for American Places in 2009. She is represented by Martha Schneider Gallery, Chicago, JDC Gallery, San Diego, and WallSpace Gallery, Santa Barbara.