Tag Archives: Art Research

Call Out – London-based collective Jur•nl seeks online responses and collaborators for experimental research zine

Wonder Valley, California, April 2012. Photo Miranda Gavin

JUR•NL CALLS FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
It’s a beautiful hot day in the UK so only a short post about a call I received from a collective asking for a contribution. I was more than happy to contribute a photo I took recently in Wonder Valley California as a stimulus. Since I sent it in, I’ve checked the website and some of the responses, both images and text, are intriguing and have got me thinking about the image again. This is the cyclical nature of work, you make it, look at it, re-look at it, have someone else look at it, and perhaps, in some small way, one’s initial response shifts.

I want to suggest to the collective that original contributor also responds to the image again so that this response can feed into the process. When I saw the photo and the images researched and quotes, I thought of a David Lynch quote from Catching the Big Fish that I would like to contribute. First, I need to find the book.

“jur•nl is a collective of five young London-based artists and photographers working together on an experimental collaborative project with professionals, whilst also engaging others in the communication between images themselves as well as creative research.

“The jur•nl concept takes a stimulus from an artist/photographer/professional and during the week, as a collective and network, they gather research in the form of images/text/video etc on their site. At the end of the week they come together as a group and create a single image in response to the stimulus. Now, the collective has widened tthe call and anyone can contribute creative research on the site, in response to the stimuli.

“From the content gathered on the site, jur•nl will create zines which will feature the public contributors work/research alongside professionals.

The creative research jur•nl is looking for can be photographs, drawings, text, video… absolutely anything in a creative or research format which relates to the stimulus of the week. So far established artists and photographers contributing have included Zed Nelson, Elina Brotherus and Emma Critchley with many more to come.

“Get in touch with your submissions and be sure to write your name when submitting so the work can be tagged with your name. Please feel free to ask questions via email, or other social networking sites.” (from the press release)

Twitter @jurnlcollective
Facebook: Jur•nl collective
[email protected]

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: art. research, collaboration, collective, David Lynch, Jur•nl, London College of Communication, Photography, Wonder Valley

Insha’Allah: Morocco’s Changing Culture

We reached a vast field just beyond Casablanca’s limit. Dusty trails wandered toward the center, where they crisscrossed then extended further outward toward mosques, half made tenement blocks and shanty towns. The sun felt metallic hot. Opaque echos of a single prayer call grazed us with the coming breeze. More began to rise, until the many voices braided the air around us. I watched and froze the sprawling urban panorama that vibrated behind heat waves, until the voices faded away.

This past June I spent five weeks in North Africa participating in an art-research project called Beyond Digital: Morocco. As a collaborative, experimental project, each of the seven multi-disciplined participants interpreted a core research theme centered around contemporary Moroccan music and the culture it emerges from. I used this evocative aspect of the culture as a guide to explore the country’s current landscape, both environmental and social.

Morocco is a landscape at the precipice. At the far western edge of the Muslim world, it is both a world unto itself and a historic doorway between Europe, the Middle East and Africa. These varied influences have woven themselves into a unique cultural fabric, marked with sharp contrasts. Today, Western cultural trends, international investment projects and sprawling urban development jostle together with the country’s Muslim and ancient Berber cultures. To this is added the pressing undertone of Morocco’s ambivalent position within the developing Arab Spring.

My goal was to make a series of images which would capture the concurrent dynamics of this contemporary Moroccan landscape. As a foreign artist, I wanted to seek the edges of the landscape that fell away from the ways Morocco is generally represented, allowing the landscape to recount its story through the image-making process. This photographic contribution was one of several media involved in the larger project, from documentary video shorts to software design, each offering its own artistic interpretation, thus creating a multi-faceted experiment in how art and cultural research can work in tandem.

John Francis Peters is a New York based photographer and photo editor.