Tag Archives: Art Fairs

Andy Freeberg

Andy Freeberg should have been a major league baseball player as his projects hit home run after home run.  His new project, Art Fare, just rounded the corner and crossed home base, again. And he’s just opened an exhibition of Art Fare at the Paul Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles which will run through October 27th.

Born in NYC, Andy was an early observer of a sophisticated city culture and after college in Michigan, began a professional photography career in New York taking portraits for such publications as The Village Voice, Rolling Stone, Time, and Fortune, photographing the likes of Michael Jackson, Bill Gates, and Neil Young. I think being a native New Yorker cultivates a wry and subtlety pointed way of looking at the world, kind of like the cool guy at the party who holds back and observes the drunken dance floor, with a smirk and a knowing.

Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum, from Guardians
Andy has been fascinated with the gallery and museum worlds for a long time and often turns his camera on the dealers, gallery patrons, artists, museum guards, and their interplay with the works of art themselves. His project Guardians, about the women that guard the art in Russian museums, won Photolucida’s Critical Mass book award and was published in 2010. One of my favorite series, Sentry, takes a look at galleristas that stand guard at the reception desks in the world of Chelsea galleries in NYC.

Metro Pictures, from Sentry

Art Fare: Gallery owners and their staff are usually hidden behind large entry desks and closed office doors. But at the major art fairs I’ve visited, like New York’s Armory Show and Art Basel in Miami and Switzerland, they’re in plain view in their booths.
As if on stage, you can see art dealers meeting with collectors, selling and negotiating, talking on cell phones, working on laptops, and manipulating touch screens in 21st century postures newly adapted for the latest electronic devices. I found the lighting, costumes, and set design excellent for photographing these living dioramas, where the art world plays itself.



Nina Menocal
Sean Kelly
 Annie de Villepoix

Skarstedt
Andrea Rosen
Christopher Cutts
Chuck and Andy at Gagosian

Claire Oliver

Gagosian

Hasted Hunt Kraeutler

Ileana Tounta

Leonard Ruethmueller
Marlborough
Rokeby
Gary Snyder
Spinello

Affordable Art Fair, Aperture Booth, & W.M. Hunt

Over the course of twelve years the Affordable Art Fair has transformed the model of the traditional art fair, driving the notion that fine art is within everyone’s reach, showcasing new and emerging artists, galleries, and must-see installations in 11 locations around the world. To date, the roster includes editions in Amsterdam, Bristol, Brussels, London, Los Angeles, Melbourne, Milan, New York, North London, Singapore, and Sydney.

Will Ramsay founded the fair in 1999 as an extension of the ‘accessible’ marketing drive evolved from Will’s Art Warehouse, the UK gallery that he has maintained since 1996, and today specializes in selling a wide range of contemporary art priced between £40 and £4,000. In an interview with Table Talk, Ramsay notes, “My aim, when founding the Affordable Art Fair was to break down the barriers of the sometimes stuffy and intimidating art world — giving ‘the terrified’ the opportunity to enjoy and collect art in a fun and informal atmosphere.” He often relays an experience of entering galleries and being met with “frosty reception”, a fear factor that he sought to eliminate in launching the first Affordable Art Fair in London, 1999. This first fair, an instant hit, attracted 87 galleries, 10,000 visitors, and grossed £1 million in sales. Now, a bit more than a decade since its founding, the Affordable Art Fair is an internationally-recognized and leading showcase for contemporary art, having welcomed more than one million visitors as of 2011, and sold over $270 million worth of art.

NEXT WEEK, the UK-based fair makes a return to the art capital of the US for its third annual spring edition, hosting more than seventy unique exhibitors over five days at 7W in New York City. Browse the full list of exhibitors here.

Wednesday through Sunday, join Aperture at the Affordable Art Fair to browse and buy a selection of just-published books, bestsellers, and new limited-edition prints, plus take advantage of a special offer on Aperture-magazine subscriptions.

Thursday, April 19, Aperture will present a talk and walk-through with W. M. HUNT, curator, collector, consultant, teacher, fundraiser, and author of the new Aperture book The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious ($52.50, available here). Join Bill, who is known for his wit and larger-than-life personality, for an entertaining presentation on the art of collecting.

Aperture Booth and The Insider’s Eye:
A Talk and Walk-through with W. M. Hunt
Wednesday, April 18, 2012–Sunday, April 22, 2012

Admission Required

The Affordable Art Fair
7 West 34th Street
New York, New York
(212) 255-2003

Colombo Art Biennale 2012 audio podcast with festival founder and director Annoushka Hempel

With just 12 days to go till the Colombo Art Biennale (CAB) opens – from 15-19 February – the Roaming Eye (tRE) caught up with CAB  festival founder and director Annoushka Hempel to find out more ahead of the opening.

Annoushka kindly spared 30 mins to talk to Hotshoe Blog about how the festival started in post-conflict Sri Lanka, its aims, the type of works on show, funding, the theme ‘Becoming’, and future developments and hopes. The festival takes place across three sites Park Street Mews, JDA Perera Gallery and the National Art Gallery.

The audio is just under 30 mins long and it’s really worth listening to every second. So, why not tune in while you cook, clean or just sit back and listen.

Click on the link below – it goes lime green – then follow it the podcast named CAB Annoushka Hempel_Audio1 and click again for it to load. Enjoy.

Colombo Art Biennale 2012 interview with Annoushka Hempel

For those who like visuals, watch this video I am  (1m 59s) – a multimedia exploration of identity through the lives of Sri Lankan elders. It reflects on the question: Was there a time when Sri Lankans didn’t describe themselves as Sinhalese, Tamil, Muslim or Burgher? and is a journey seeking a generation who identified themselves based on kith and kin, livelihoods and hometowns as they did in times of lore and in so doing it sheds light on questions about identity and experiences of conflict.

Kannan Arunasalam’s journey took him to Jaffna, Kandy and Galle, where he visited churches, kovils, temples and mosques and was welcomed into people’s homes and workplaces. He met and photographed elders; many wise men and women who trusted him with their life stories.

Also here’s another video snippet (1m 13s) with Nigel Sense (Australia) – one of the featured artists at the Colombo Art Biennale 2012.

Filed under: Art Fairs & Biennales, Podcasts, short films Tagged: Annoushka Hempel, art biennale, Australia, Colombo Art Biennale 2012, Kannan Arunasalam, Miranda Gavin, Nigel Sense, Sri Lanka

VIP Art Fair 2.0 returns for a second year online from 3 to 8 February

Enter the Art World online from tomorrow, preview day today.

VIP Art Fair online discussion with Catherine Opie 3 February 10:00 EST

For the second year, the VIP Art Fair 2.0 (Viewing In Private, not Very Important Person) goes live to the general public from tomorrow 3-8 February and further expands its geographic footprint, with over 115 galleries representing 33 countries. New for the fair is the Editions and Multiples hall, where museums and art institutions will offer multiples and editions for purchase during the fair.

There are a number of online discussions including:

VIP Art Fair online discussion with Ai Weiwei 3 February 10:00 EST.

The Art Market with Michael Plummer today at 10:00 EST as well as Catherine Opie: ‘Girlfriends‘ with Diana Nyad and Ai Weiwei: ‘Surveillance Camera’ tomorrow at 10:00 EST. You need to sign up to take part.

VIP 2.0 is available on all browsers, iPad, and all major mobile devices. See last years’ post about the Gagosian Gallery at the VIP Art Fair.

Filed under: Art Fairs & Biennales, Art Galleries, Artist Talks Tagged: Ai Weiwei, Catherine Opie, Michael Plummer, online art fair, VIP Art Fair, VIP Art Fair 2012, Web 2.0 discussion

Hotshoe Blog supports second Colombo Art Biennale 2012

Just a quick post to point readers, and those who land on the site intentionally or unintentionally, to the Colombo Art Biennale 2012 taking place next month from 15-19 February inclusive. Hotshoe Blog doesn’t carry advertising usually but is happy to support artistic and photographic endeavours worldwide, such as festivals and event, particularly those that are new or have only recently been established.

Plus, The Roaming Eye has fallen in love with Sri Lanka; its people, the diversity of the landscape, the warmth and the organised chaos. And, despite the huge challenges facing many people in aspects of economic, social and political life – people still smile. Smile, because you can and it’s free.

So, do spread the word about the second biennale and set it as a date in your calender. The Roaming Eye will be chatting with one of the directors Annoushka Hempel this week and will be visiting the festival for two days in February. Back to some photo news round ups for the next post.

Filed under: Art Fairs & Biennales, Photographers Tagged: Annoushka Hempel, art festival, Becoming Colombo, Colombo Art Biennial, contemporary photography, Sri Lanka

This is not a review: Paris Photo 2011

Paris is still recovering from the busiest week of the year on the photography calendar with the 2011 edition of Paris Photo which was held at the Grand Palais from 10-13 November and the many other events that pop up around it (Offprint, Nofound, Fotofever). In recent years Paris Photo has established itself as the most important photography art fair in Europe (maybe even in the world?) and this was a turning point for the fair. For it’s 15th birthday, Paris Photo gave itself a pretty big present in the form of a move from the not-exactly-shabby Caroussel du Louvre, which did suffer from a lack of space, air, seating and natural light, to the Grand Palais which has all of those in spades. The relocation was deemed controversial by some, as people were attached to the Caroussel du Louvre which had housed Paris Photo since its inception. There was also some concern that the size of the Grand Palais space would lead to a more impersonal, bloated fair that would lose the strong identity that Paris Photo had created for itself.

Now that the dust has settled, it is difficult to find many dissenters on the big move. The Grand Palais is pretty much unbeatable as a space for housing a fair, particularly given the amount of natural light that pours in through the several-storey-high glass roof (sunny days can be a bit problematic but if they can find a way to guarantee cloud cover, you will not find better light for looking at photographs). The fair has increased in size with 117 galleries, 27 more than in 2010, and 18 publishers, but the airier premises make it feel less crowded and, if you put your mind to it, it is possible to find enough space to spend time looking at photographs without jostling for space with other visitors. The gallery newcomers included Pace/MacGill, Gagosian, Fraenkel and Marian Goodman, which gave a heavyweight feel to proceedings. Gagosian, who apparently doesn’t really do art fairs, had a interesting quirk to his booth: a closet-sized “private viewing room”, presumably so that the unseemly practice of paying for art would not have to take place in public.

Installation of Ed van der Elsken's Love on the Left Bank

One of the biggest improvements of the fair was the space devoted to photo-books, something that had been a point of contention in recent years. Although there was no increase in the number of participating publishers and book dealers, their booths were far bigger (the Steidl booth must have tripled in size) and this seemed to be a particularly busy section of the fair. There was also a great installation by Markus Schaden of Ed Van der Elsken’s wonderful Love on the Left Bank. The installation, a kind of exploded book, gave a great sense of the process of putting a book together. And finally the Paris Photo book prize was launched to reward “a reference photographic book that has marked the past 15 years” (editor’s note: the English translation of the Paris Photo website leaves a lot to be desired). Paul Graham’s A Shimmer of Possibility was the deserved winner.

Andrew Bush wall at M+B gallery

I guess at this point that I should say something about the photography itself. With a fair the size of Paris Photo I’m convinced that every visitor has a different experience and it is impossible not to find things both to love and to hate. My overall impression was of a strong year with a fairly diverse selection of material, whereas sometimes it can feel like the same pictures pop up on every booth. I don’t think Paris Photo is the place to see the cutting edge of contemporary photography, although there is always something hiding around a corner if you look hard enough, but rather a venue for great vintage work and a cross-section of what is ‘hot’ right now.

Sigmar Polke at Springer & Winckler Kunsthandel

Some brief personal highlights from the fair include San Francisco-based Fraenkel‘s booth, which was an achingly (overly?) tasteful mix of Diane Arbus, Lee Friedlander, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Robert Adams, Bernd & Hilla Becher, Richard Misrach, Edward Weston and others; LA gallery M+B‘s wall of Andrew Bush vector portraits of drivers in their cars; an exquisite 3×3 grid of late 1970s miniature Peter Downsbrough cityscapes at the excellent Cologne-based Thomas Zander booth; and Berlin-based Springer & Winckler Kunsthandel‘s booth devoted entirely to photographs by the recently deceased German artist Sigmar Polke. The fair has also maintained the guest country/region format from previous years and this year it was Africa that had the place of honour. This is a hit and miss exercise, but I thought Africa was well represented, and although Malick Sidibe turned up absolutely everywhere, there was a fairly diverse selection of material on show. A few personal favourites were a Michael Subotzky prison yard panorama at the South African Goodman Gallery (not to be confused with Marian), Nigerian artist J.D. Okhai Ojeikere’s typological hairstyle portraits which appeared in several places, and a Michael Wolf Real Fake Art clin d’oeil to Malick Sidibe at 51 Fine Art from Antwerp.

Michael Wolf at 51 Fine Art

Another innovation of the fair was to host exhibitions of both public (ICP, Tate Modern and Musée de l’Elysée) and private (Artur Walther, J.P. Morgan and Giorgio Armani) collections, a pretty simple idea that makes a lot of sense in the context of an art fair. Thankfully the exhibitions went beyond the “here’s some stuff we bought this year” format and were generally well-curated and/or insightful.

J.D. Okhai Ojeikere from the Artur Walther collection

The only big question mark over the success of Paris Photo 2011 has to be a commercial one. These new premises must involve a pretty significant price increase and I wonder whether the less established galleries will have made sufficient sales to compensate for the cost of a Grand Palais booth, particularly in the current turbulent economic context. With FIAC taking place just a handful of days beforehand, and a growing number of contemporary art galleries present at Paris Photo there is also a question of how these two fairs will coexist. I hope the outcome is a positive one because this edition of Paris Photo certainly felt like the best yet.

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Related posts:

  1. Paris November photo madness round-up
  2. November Photo Madness in Paris
  3. Paris Photo: crossing the finish line

Paris Photo 2011 Spotlights Sub-Saharan Africa

With its grand new setting in the Grand Palais, nearly 120 exhibiting galleries, and tens of thousands of expected visitors, Paris Photo has secured its place as the n’est plus ultra of photography fairs.

That hasn’t kept its new director, Julien Frydman, from having even greater ambitions for the 15th anniversary of the annual event, which begins today and runs through Nov. 13. “It’s about getting out of the ghetto,” says Frydman, the former chief of Magnum Photos in the French capital, who notes that until recently, documentary photography has languished as a sideshow in the history of art. “We want to make sure this photo fair is among the best art fairs of the world.”

Paris Photo 2011 certainly has a lot going for it already. This year, the theme of Sub-Saharan Africa will be marked by a display of portraits from the private trove of German collector Artur Walther and a special exhibition of up-and-coming young African talent. Visitors will be treated to a vast array of images from the continent, from Malick Sidebé’s celebration of Malian pop culture in the 1969′s to Richard Mosse’s pink-hued portraits of modern Congo.

In addition to its usual swarm of galleries, this year’s fair will feature a suite of new attractions intended to up its global profile. Frydman hopes the new Paris Photo Platform, a discussion forum, will debunk the notion of documentary photography as an insular art form. Led by art historian Chantal Pontbriant, the Platform will feature “thinkers, artists, art critics—but not the usual suspects,” he promises. To bring alive this dialogue between photography and other genres, storied curator André Magnin will bring together paintings and photographs by artists such as Yinka Shonibare and Seydou Keïta.

Another new feature, “Recent acquisitions,” uncovers how museums collect their artworks, from the Tate Modern’s focus on the oeuvre of Daido Moriyama to the Musée de l’Elysée’s acquisition of the Charlie Chaplin estate.

In time, Frydman hopes that his innovations will “skyrocket the fair into the top 10” art fairs in the world. It’s important to him, however, that it doesn’t lose its heart along the way. “What I wanted to keep is the conviviality,” he says, noting the fair’s ambiance of friendship and shared passion. “That’s something to keep as a treasure.”

Paris Photo runs through Nov. 13 in the French capital. Read more about it here.

Sonia van Gilder Cooke is a reporter in TIME’s London bureau. Follow her on Twitter at @svangildercooke.

Report from Buenos Aires Photo 2011

This weekend is the annual photography fair here, Buenos Aires Photo. I went on Friday and snapped a bunch of pictures of stuff I liked. Here’s a brief report:

The fair takes places at the Palais de Glace, a building in Recoleta from Argentina’s golden era. It originally housed an ice-skating rink [in 1911] and today features a rotating schedule of art fairs and exhibits. The architecture of the building is fascinating.

Buenos Aires Photo at Palais de Glace

Buenos Aires Photo at Palais de Glace

It’s cool to dis art fairs like this because they’re very commercial and filled with mediocre crap. While true, I go anyway because I always discover stuff I like, even stuff that blows me away.

One of the things I like the most about this fair [and other photography fairs I’ve been to] is the amount of vintage black & white prints by long established [or long dead] masters. If you happened to have missed so-and-so’s retrospective in 1987 [or whenever] these fairs are basically your only shot and seeing beautiful, vintage, black & white prints.

Wall featuring vintage prints by Anatole Saderman, Annemarie Heinrich, Alex Klein, Grete Stern, Juan Di Sandro, and Fred Schiffer

Vintage print by Pierre Verger

A while back I wrote a post about Pierre Verger. I love his photos.

Oscar Pintor is a classic of Argentine photography. Active in the 1970s and 1980s mostly, his black & white photos have a balance of dry-ness and romanticism. My friend Emma commented that they seem very contemporary. I think I’ll need to write a post just about his photos. They’re that awesome.

Oscar Pintor prints

Aldo Sessa is equal parts Annie Leibovitz and Ansel Adams. He makes big, technically perfect photographs of obvious subjects, utterly lacking in soul. He produces massive coffee table books featuring tango dancers and gauchos. For most people in Argentina, outside of the photo-ghetto, Sessa IS photography. He has his own vanity-gallery at this year’s fair, and, believe it or not, I was actually taken with a small set of color photographs of the industrial side of Buenos Aires taken in the late 1950s [take that Eggleston!].

Aldo Sessa, early color

Aldo Sessa, early color

There’s a group of photos documenting artistic actions by conceptual artist Luiz Pazos, from 1973. They look like they were a lot of fun to make. 1973 was an interesting year for Argentina. Perón was elected again as president after 18 years of exile. There was a brief flowering of arts and culture that was snuffed out in 1976 following the militar coup.

Luiz Pazos

Perhaps my favorite photo in the entire fair was this one by Roberto Riverti. Taken in 1987 in the rural city of Chascomus, it’s a night photograph of an old cinema showing a double bill of Back to the Future and D.C. Cab [starring Mr. T!!]

Roberto Riverti, movie theatre in Chascomus

Then, of course, there’s a lot of contemporary stuff in color.

Marcos Lopez

I once read a quote by Marcos Lopez stating something to the effect that he can only make images in Latin America. I was interested, then, to see these photos, made this year in Lithuania. The photos are pared down from the high-baroque style of Lopez’s recent photos, but still recognizably Marcos.

res

A very large photo by res of an abstract color pattern painted on the side of a shack in a shantytown.

Santiago Porter

Santiago Porter’s giant photo shows the ever-so-slight inclination in the generally very flat pampas landscape. I’ve been sort of fascinated lately with flatness in landscape photography. I’m reminded of this quote from Charles Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle:

For many leagues north and south…the country is really level. Scarcely anything which travelers have written about its extreme flatness can be considered as exaggeration…. At sea, a person’s eye being six feet above the surface of the water, his horizon is two miles and four-fifths distant. In like manner, the more level the plain, the more nearly does the horizon approach within these narrow limits; and this, in my opinion, entirely destroys that grandeur which one would have imagined that a vast level plain would have possessed.

With Porter’s photograph, we don’t even get that far because it’s shrouded in fog.

Emma Livingston

Emma Livingston’s lovely tree portraits.

Esteban Pastorino

A kite photograph by Esteban Pastorino. He builds his own cameras and has a bunch of cool projects.

Guido Chouela

A nocturnal ochava by Guido Chouela. He’s got an interesting series of factories that I’ve been meaning to blog about for awhile.

Hans Stoll

Peruvian photographer Hans Stoll shares my fascination with Buenos Aires rooftops.

Daniela Trajtenberg

Interesting still lifes by Daniel Trajtenberg.

Sebastian Desbats

Sebastian Desbats does these retrofuturistic photos involving rocks, sea water and objects suggestive of space ships.

Roberto Huarcaya

Roberto Huarcaya, detail

Roberto Huarcaya’s panoramic photo depicts the divide in economic class on Lima’s outskirts between a gated community ringed with barbed wire and the humble houses on the other side. A similar panorama, showing a public and private beach, won last year’s Petrobras prize, which is an important prize given annually as part of the fair.

This year the prize went to Eduardo Gil and Nacho Iasparra who won 1st and 2nd place, respectively. They are the two photographers here in Argentina I’ve been taking workshops with for the last two years, so this was very exciting.

Eduardo Gil

Nacho Iasparra

Here’s a list of 2011 honorable mentions for the Petrobras prize. For me the winner of the nicest prints goes to Martin Weber’s color work.

Martin Weber

Martin Weber

Both of these photos come from Weber’s series Echoes from the Interior. I love the subject matter and the quality of his prints is stunning. Good printing is starting to seem like a lost art.

Finally, one of my favorite things was this small side exhibit by Eduardo Carrera. Called naturaleza it features photos of potted plans, girls and zoo animals. While this sounds random, I found it really worked well together and had this whimsical grace about it. It was a nice relief to the bombast of so much of the large work one sees at fairs like this.

Eduardo Carrera

Eduardo Carrera

I really like Carrera’s work in general, especially his series Verano Porteño, which I’ve blogged about before.

And that’s about it. I went during the afternoon and the place was empty. I felt like I had the whole place to myself and it let me really see all the stands. The low attendance probably had something to do with the glorious spring weather here in Buenos Aires at the moment.

Primavera Porteña

Only a geek like me would choose to spend a sunny afternoon like this in a dark hall looking at photographs. I loved it, though.