Tag Archives: Art Critics

E. Brady Robinson

There are an infinite amount of approaches to portraiture, and one that is incredibly revealing and insightful is to look at personal spaces.  E. Brady Robinson has explored this approach in her terrific series, Desks as Portraits: An Inside Look at the DC Art World . I first met Brady as a co-exhibitor at the Lishui Photography Fesitval in China this past fall.  Her exhibition was greeted by the Chinese with great success and it garnered her the Grand Prize in the American Life exhibition.

Brady has a long roster of exhibitions, has been featured in a myriad of publications, and her work is held in many significant collections. She received her MFA in Photography from Cranbrook Academy of Art and
BFA in Photography from The Maryland Institute, College of Art in
Baltimore, Maryland . Brady  maintains a studio in Washington,
DC and Orlando, Florida. She is Associate Professor in the School of
Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida. Brady is also working to make Fotoweek D.C., running November 9-18th, a huge success.

Images from Desks as
Portraits: An Inside Look at the DC Art World 

Desks as Portraits: An Inside Look at the DC Art World documents the desks of artists, curators, collectors, art critics, dealers, museum directors and taste makers in the District. This project has become a “six degrees of separation” in the DC Art World. One photo shoot leads to another in which Brady asks for recommendations and names of possible subjects. Further introductions are made and invitations accepted which allows her private access to people who are making significant contributions to contemporary art and photography in DC.

This series explores the concept of desk as portrait combined with the social experiment of navigating the DC art world. Robinson plans to continue this series in new markets at home and abroad. This work has been featured in The Washington Post, Channel One Russia TV and won Grand Prize in the “American Life” exhibition in the 2011 Lishui Photography Festival.

Paris Photo 2011 Spotlights Sub-Saharan Africa

With its grand new setting in the Grand Palais, nearly 120 exhibiting galleries, and tens of thousands of expected visitors, Paris Photo has secured its place as the n’est plus ultra of photography fairs.

That hasn’t kept its new director, Julien Frydman, from having even greater ambitions for the 15th anniversary of the annual event, which begins today and runs through Nov. 13. “It’s about getting out of the ghetto,” says Frydman, the former chief of Magnum Photos in the French capital, who notes that until recently, documentary photography has languished as a sideshow in the history of art. “We want to make sure this photo fair is among the best art fairs of the world.”

Paris Photo 2011 certainly has a lot going for it already. This year, the theme of Sub-Saharan Africa will be marked by a display of portraits from the private trove of German collector Artur Walther and a special exhibition of up-and-coming young African talent. Visitors will be treated to a vast array of images from the continent, from Malick Sidebé’s celebration of Malian pop culture in the 1969′s to Richard Mosse’s pink-hued portraits of modern Congo.

In addition to its usual swarm of galleries, this year’s fair will feature a suite of new attractions intended to up its global profile. Frydman hopes the new Paris Photo Platform, a discussion forum, will debunk the notion of documentary photography as an insular art form. Led by art historian Chantal Pontbriant, the Platform will feature “thinkers, artists, art critics—but not the usual suspects,” he promises. To bring alive this dialogue between photography and other genres, storied curator André Magnin will bring together paintings and photographs by artists such as Yinka Shonibare and Seydou Keïta.

Another new feature, “Recent acquisitions,” uncovers how museums collect their artworks, from the Tate Modern’s focus on the oeuvre of Daido Moriyama to the Musée de l’Elysée’s acquisition of the Charlie Chaplin estate.

In time, Frydman hopes that his innovations will “skyrocket the fair into the top 10” art fairs in the world. It’s important to him, however, that it doesn’t lose its heart along the way. “What I wanted to keep is the conviviality,” he says, noting the fair’s ambiance of friendship and shared passion. “That’s something to keep as a treasure.”

Paris Photo runs through Nov. 13 in the French capital. Read more about it here.

Sonia van Gilder Cooke is a reporter in TIME’s London bureau. Follow her on Twitter at @svangildercooke.

MoCP in the News: Press for Our Origins

“Where do we, as humans, come from?” With such a broad question at the heart of Our Origins, it’s no wonder the exhibition has gotten people talking. From art critics to bloggers, take a look at what people are saying about Our Origins, which is on display at the MoCP through October 16:

Ray_blog_9.28.11.jpg
Jennifer Ray, Strangler Fig Embrace, 2009; Courtesy of the artist

“Inspired by everything from fossils to x-ray diffusion, this ambitious group show considers the unanswerable questions — all from a very self-conscious, often very funny point of view.” – Flavor Pill Chicago

“The chatter about where we come from seems inescapable. Which is what makes the relative silence of Our Origins refreshing.” – Chicago Reader

“Plenty of thought-provoking works on view.” – Time Out Chicago

“[Our Origins] reflects on natural history from a distinctly human point of view.” – The Beacon-News

“For all the wit, wisdom and insight here, Alison Ruttan steals the show… [While she] may not have revealed the mysteries of being; she has effectively portrayed us as too close to other primates for comfort, evoking a mixture of humor, absurdity, depression, truth and self-recognition.” – Newcity Art

In addition to the show, curator Allison Grant also gets a little love:

“It’s refreshing to see a curator take aim at the largest human questions, and it’s good for Grant’s first exhibition ever. I admire that ambition and hope Grant will continue probing those deep questions, since for as many artists as there are investigating consumerism and commodity culture, there are just as many examining the hard philosophical and scientific question” – Art Slant

Ignacio Iasparra Solo Show on View at John Jones

Ignacio Iasparra Solo Show on View at John Jones

Nacho Iasparra

Nacho Iasparra

Presented by Lodeveans Collection and John Jones, Argentine photographer Ignacio Iasparra’s debut show in the UK opened with great success last Friday. This remarkable series of images made between 2003 and 2008 depict what Isparra describes as various ‘moments of light and colour,’ shot in different settings throughout Argentina, including the forests and woodlands of the Tigré and Paraná Deltas.

The series offers the viewer a speculative experience, revealing subtle and endless variations of light, colour and shadow. Each image effectively becomes dislocated from any specific sense of place, as Iasparra‘s photographs present ambiguous and only partially defined environments. A fragmented subjectivity, achieved through the act of framing, creates an impression of disruption and estrangement, as well as a sense of immersion and immediacy.

I realized that on each occasion the place mattered less. I was not looking for images of a certain place, but for sensations. My intention was to confront clear images with vague sensations. I thought it was important that the elements of the image were recognizable, that it didn’t turn into pure abstraction. After all, they are photographs…My search was for an almost abstract estrangement and sense of wonder.
Ignacio Iasparra, 2010.

Born in 1973 in a rural town near Buenos Aires, Iasparra continues to work in Argentina. He graduated from the Escuela Argentina de Fotografia, where he studied under Ricardo Torosian and Fabiana Barreda. moisturiser . He has had a number of solo exhibitions in Buenos Aires, and his work has been part of various seminal group shows.

In 2005, Iasparra was elected Photographer of the Year by the Argentine Association of Art Critics. free guitar lessons . He has works in the Museum of Modern Art in Buenos Aires and MALBA’s Colección Costantini. He continues to explore the array of photographic possibilities of Argentina and beyond, through the ongoing development of his artistic practice.

Special thanks to John Jones, the Lodeveans Collection, the Argentine Embassy in the United Kingdom, Sarah Toplis (Curator) and Yinan Zhang (Exhibition Assistant).

For more information please visit John Jones and Lodeveans Collection.

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