Tag Archives: Art And Photography

Michael Mergen

Now that we know who will be living at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue for the next four years, we might want to consider who else lives at that very famous address.  As a bookend to his series, VOTE, that ran on Lenscratch yesterday, Michael Mergen has created a terrific series about a very famous address.

Michael earned a BFA in photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology and an MFA in photography at the Rhode Island School of Design. He began his career as a photojournalist, working for national newspapers and newswire services in Boston and then his hometown of Philadelphia. His current work focuses on ideas and notions of America and its institutions.  He has exhibited nationally and internationally and his work is held in several public and private collections. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Art and Photography at Longwood University in Farmville, VA.

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue 

With 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, I sough to explore and document the American landscape using the constant of the country’s most famous address – the White House. Using this address as a constant, I made straightforward images of everyday America. What followed is a vernacular, kaleidoscopic view of this country: lower and middle class homes of all sorts, mundane structures of a waste water treatment plant, and bland, nameless brick and cinderblock buildings. And it is this contrast to the regal white columns of the White House, its manicured lawn and historical context that makes these buildings so interesting, the familiar humdrum of the American landscape, that simple happenstance of sharing an address with the most significant of all.

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Pine Bluff, AK
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania
Street, Gary, IN
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Irwin, PA
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Lorain, OH
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
McDonough, GA
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Miami Beach, FL
, 2008

 1600 S Pennsylvania Avenue,
Morrisville, PA
, 2008

 

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Newton Falls, OH
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Whiting, NJ
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Guilderland, NY
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Salem, OH, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Stoughton, MA
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue
NE, St Petersburg, FL
, 2008

 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Tyrone, PA
, 2008

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
West Mifflin, PA
, 2008

Michael Mergen: Vote!

Virginia photographer, Michael Mergen, has one of the best series I’ve seen about where and how we vote.  His project, VOTE, shines a stunning light on how “mom and pop” our voting system is and reflects the head-scratching realization that it is truly a miracle that we get anyone elected.  These images speak to the potential of error, but they also speak to the fact that much of America is built on a mom and pop reality, where the corner store is still the heart of the community.

Michael earned a BFA in photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology and an MFA in photography at the Rhode Island School of Design. He began his career as a photojournalist, working for national newspapers and newswire services in Boston and then his hometown of Philadelphia. His current work focuses on ideas and notions of America and its institutions.  He has exhibited nationally and internationally and his work is held in several public and private collections. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Art and Photography at Longwood University in Farmville, VA.

VOTE
 Photographed on Election Day from 2008-2010, Vote documents the spaces where the ideals of our political system meet the mundane realities of participatory democracy. These polling places in unusual, privately owned locations, pointedly do not live up to the majesty of American democracy, yet still speak to a kind of vernacular Americana. The work suggests a collision of public and private.

When a voter is confronted with the decision to vote or shop, vote or eat, vote or skate, which role is expected of us, the role of citizen, or the role of consumer? What happens when confronted with both simultaneously? What does voting in a private home say about the encroachment of government into private life? Or does locating polling machines in places such as supermarkets and shopping malls make voting more convenient and spur a higher turnout? 

The series also points to the temporal quality of Election Day – the days’ brevity contrasting with the perceived permanence of the space it briefly inhabits. In all works, I emphasize the apparent incongruity between the primary function of the space and the temporal use of the space as a polling place. The voting machines act as stand-ins, set up and waiting for voters to activate them. As if transported from another world, the machines remind us of the often haphazard way in which elections are conducted.

Through extensive research at the state, county, and local level, I indentified the locations I intended to photograph. Using Google maps, I created a map of each state or county to determine an itinerary for the particular Election Day, making edits based on proximity of each location, keeping in mind the relatively short day and sometimes hundreds of miles between polling places.

E. Brady Robinson

There are an infinite amount of approaches to portraiture, and one that is incredibly revealing and insightful is to look at personal spaces.  E. Brady Robinson has explored this approach in her terrific series, Desks as Portraits: An Inside Look at the DC Art World . I first met Brady as a co-exhibitor at the Lishui Photography Fesitval in China this past fall.  Her exhibition was greeted by the Chinese with great success and it garnered her the Grand Prize in the American Life exhibition.

Brady has a long roster of exhibitions, has been featured in a myriad of publications, and her work is held in many significant collections. She received her MFA in Photography from Cranbrook Academy of Art and
BFA in Photography from The Maryland Institute, College of Art in
Baltimore, Maryland . Brady  maintains a studio in Washington,
DC and Orlando, Florida. She is Associate Professor in the School of
Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida. Brady is also working to make Fotoweek D.C., running November 9-18th, a huge success.

Images from Desks as
Portraits: An Inside Look at the DC Art World 

Desks as Portraits: An Inside Look at the DC Art World documents the desks of artists, curators, collectors, art critics, dealers, museum directors and taste makers in the District. This project has become a “six degrees of separation” in the DC Art World. One photo shoot leads to another in which Brady asks for recommendations and names of possible subjects. Further introductions are made and invitations accepted which allows her private access to people who are making significant contributions to contemporary art and photography in DC.

This series explores the concept of desk as portrait combined with the social experiment of navigating the DC art world. Robinson plans to continue this series in new markets at home and abroad. This work has been featured in The Washington Post, Channel One Russia TV and won Grand Prize in the “American Life” exhibition in the 2011 Lishui Photography Festival.

Patricia Piccinini

What is it about Australians that make them a bit….well, different?

Photographer, sculptor, artist and writer, Patricia Piccinini, is part of an exhibition at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville,TN, Fairy Tales, Monsters, and the Genetic Imagination that runs through May 28th. Born in Sierra Leone, Patricia moved to Australia as a girl. She received a Bachelor of Arts (Economic History) from Australian National University and a Bachelor of Arts (Painting) from the Victorian College of the Arts. She exhibits worldwide, and her site reveals the scope of her vision, including essays on art and photography. An exhibition of her sculptures, There are no Strangers, is currently on display at the Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne through April 21st.

I’m sharing a range of her work, not necessarily included in these exhibitions.


Alley, 11.15am
© All rights reserved Patricia Piccinini 2011 Australia
from The Fitzroy Series


Sitting Room, 2.30pm
© All rights reserved Patricia Piccinini 2011 Australia
from The Fitzroy Series


Library, 8.45pm
© All rights reserved Patricia Piccinini 2011 Australia
from The Fitzroy Series


Street, 3.10am
© All rights reserved Patricia Piccinini 2011 Australia
2011 from The Fitzroy Series


Workshop, 7.00pm
© All rights reserved Patricia Piccinini 2011 Australia
from The Fitzroy Series

Some of Patricia’s sculpture installations:

Huge Art and Photobook Sale in Chelsea, NYC

When: Friday September 30th, Saturday October 1st from 10am to 5pm each day AND Sunday October 2nd from 12 to 5pm.

Where: 526 West 26th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues in Chelsea, Manhattan. napa auto parts . luxury travel agency . Studio/Room 507 on the 5th floor.

5B4 is parting with hundreds of photography and art books that are priced to sell. Many are rare and out of print, some signed or inscribed by the artists. Have been collecting for 25 years and now parting with a selection of my library.

Also, rare art and photography posters, postcards and photo exhibition ephemera.

Also, dozens of books of literature, fiction and non-fiction.

Also, many picture frames in a variety of sizes.


Also, 16×20 and 20×24 darkroom four blade enlarging easels.

Stop by and say hello, buy a book, and be happy.

Baang and Burne Contemporary: 6X6

I am already exhausted just reading through what is about to happen in New York this fall. The tireless and outside-the-box new wave curators/gallerists/artists, Charlie Grosso and Kesha Bruce of Baang + Burne Contemporary have created a non-stop event of six weekly exhibitions, or 6×6 starting tonight, September 8th, and running through October 18th. Their guerilla style exhibition schedule is high-octane fuel for the art lover. In addition to the 6 planned exhibits, they are taping into the cultural veins of New York to mix blood with Interior design, décor, and architecture professionals, chefs, wine aficiandos, and other independent curators. It’s art on a rock concert scale and it’s going to get loud!

Baang and Burne Contemporary was created with one singular purpose in mind–removing the intimidation factor from the art buying experience and replacing it with real excitement. Charlie and Kesha are fearless in their attempts to celebrate art and photography and believe that everyone is a potential collector. They had a successful funding experience through Kickstarter that will push their agenda further and this Fall, present an art festival in the center of the art world, New York City. 6×6 is 6 back-to-back, 1-week-only art exhibits featuring a line-up of 12 international artists. In addition to the exhibits, there is also tons of exciting programming during the 6 weeks, including the brilliant 6×6 summer blog tour to help promote the events.

WEEK #1 September 8-13, 2011

Two Artists Ask the Question: What Makes Us Human?
What does it mean to be made of flesh and bone? What is the true nature of the human animal? In the inaugural exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, appropriately titled 6×6, artists Ed Smith and Charlie Grosso tackle these questions head on, while using radically different mediums and approaches.

Both artists have enjoyed successful careers documenting the visceral and fleshy boundaries of humanity. In their exhibition, Flesh and Bone, Smith’s large-scale bronze sculptures and Grosso’s gorgeously saturated photographs of food markets come together to display both the strength and the fragility that is an essential aspect of the contemporary human experience.

Images by Charlie Grosso

WEEK #2 September 15-21, 2011


Unravelling the Magic of Narrative
Every narrative involves the powerful interplay of memory and introspection that allows us to make sense of the world by defining who we are and how we fit in. In the second exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled “6×6”, artists Kesha Bruce and Jane Zweibel offer viewers a contemporary entryway to the rich tradition of storytelling in art.

The narratives Bruce and Zweibel present in Talking To Myself are composed of a mysterious mix of elements culled from the intimate terrain of memory, personal mythology, and the mundane remnants of everyday life.

From Zweibel’s large format figurative paintings on canvas that pay homage to Caravaggio to Bruce’s small delicate works on paper that render character and place through the use of minimalist text, each work in the exhibition speaks and relates to the next like non-linear chapters of a novel that doesn’t easily settle neatly into a comfortable beginning, middle, and end.

WEEK #3 September 22-28, 2011


Meditations on a Peaceful Apocalypse
Landscape, nature, ecology, and environmental issues have long been a powerful source of inspiration for contemporary artists. In the third exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled 6×6, the artwork manages to address all of these contemporary issues with uncommon beauty and grace.

In Second Nature, artists Kris Graves and Karen Rudd present a vision that is simultaneously apocalyptic and hopeful. Graves presents a series of hauntingly sublime photographs of the Icelandic landscape that enable the viewer to reconsider their relationship to the earth. Likewise, Rudd’s strikingly realistic sculptures of life-size cedar tree stumps, created from reclaimed cardboard and wood glue, express sadness and irony, but also the serene idea that nature is somehow restoring itself.

Images by Kris Graves

WEEK #4 September 29-October 5, 2011

The Art of Participation
From Cubism to Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s soup cans, Pop Art still holds court as one of the most relevant art movements of the twenty-first century due to its on-going dialogue with contemporary popular culture. In their exhibition, Please Stand By, artists Stacia Yeapanis and anonymous internet video artist Readymade 777 take this discussion a step further by using appropriation and transformation to reveal how viewers and users of cultural products like TV shows, movies, and video games, not only make meaning from the images they digest, but often become active participants in cultural production themselves.

Yeapanis’ hand-made cross-stitches are painstaking recreations of a single frame from TV shows such as Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Xena: Warrior Princess, using the decorative handicraft of embroidery as a symbol of how far we have invited and incorporated these fictional TV characters into our personal lives. Similarly, artist Readymade777 cuts together everything from VHS home video footage, film clips, 50’s TV commercial, to pornography turning them into disorienting and often harrowing digital assemblages that jolt the viewer into making visual and psychological connections between images and genres.

WEEK #5 October 6-12, 2011

Fierce Bliss Without Boundaries
Some art exhibitions are shaped around a singular theme or even around a particular medium, but in the fifth exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled “6×6”, the artworks presented are bound by their unflinching sense of immediacy and a vibrant, primal relationship to their subjects.

In Violently Happy artist Jacqueline Norheim’s complex, multi-layered paintings use texture and manipulated imagery, to explore spacial relationships and the mystery created by the use of negative space, bold energetic gesture and varied degrees of opacity. The result is a collection of bold, energetic paintings that straddle the subtle line between order and chaos.

Well known for her highly sought after “10 Minute Portraits”, Cara Lynn Kleid’s work is part portrait session and part performance. Each of her colorful, playful, yet earnest drawings captures the intense vulnerability shared by both the artist and the subject as they sit quietly, face to face, during each drawing session. Likewise, her revealing mixed-media paintings investigate emotion, identity, and the human face as a boundary and portal between our internal and external worlds.

WEEK #6 October 13-18, 2011

Where Nostalgia Meets Suspicion
In Of Faith, Power, and Glory, the sixth and final exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled “6×6”, the gallery juxtaposes photographs of Russia of a by-gone era with
strikingly painted portraits of dictators and tyrants inspired by present day “bad guys” of contemporary society.

Photographed over the course of multiple visits since 2007, Michael Kirchoff’s ongoing body of work “An Enduring Grace” explores the landscape and cultural heritage of Russia. Inspired by a childhood fascination with television broadcasts from the then Soviet Union and images of Moscow’s Red Square, Kirchoff approaches the contemporary Russian landscape with a nostalgia and wonderment that is captured on the transient Polaroid film.

In stark contrast to Kirchoff’s Russia of endless beauty and rich history, Meyer Uranovsky’s portraits of archetypal villains such as army generals, politicians, judges, kings, and dictators flanked by their henchmen, seem eerily to have been extracted from Kirchoff’s brooding Russian landscapes. Uranovsky refuses to name names, but his works, which reference the tradition of state portraiture, bring to mind Stalin, Franco, Mussolini, and Castro. But even as Uranovsky paints these characters with suspicion his role remains more that of a satirist than judge.

Images by Michael Kirchoff

Baang and Burne Contemporary: 6X6

I am already exhausted just reading through what is about to happen in New York this fall. The tireless and outside-the-box new wave curators/gallerists/artists, Charlie Grosso and Kesha Bruce of Baang + Burne Contemporary have created a non-stop event of six weekly exhibitions, or 6×6 starting tonight, September 8th, and running through October 18th. Their guerilla style exhibition schedule is high-octane fuel for the art lover. In addition to the 6 planned exhibits, they are taping into the cultural veins of New York to mix blood with Interior design, décor, and architecture professionals, chefs, wine aficiandos, and other independent curators. It’s art on a rock concert scale and it’s going to get loud!

Baang and Burne Contemporary was created with one singular purpose in mind–removing the intimidation factor from the art buying experience and replacing it with real excitement. Charlie and Kesha are fearless in their attempts to celebrate art and photography and believe that everyone is a potential collector. They had a successful funding experience through Kickstarter that will push their agenda further and this Fall, present an art festival in the center of the art world, New York City. 6×6 is 6 back-to-back, 1-week-only art exhibits featuring a line-up of 12 international artists. In addition to the exhibits, there is also tons of exciting programming during the 6 weeks, including the brilliant 6×6 summer blog tour to help promote the events.

WEEK #1 September 8-13, 2011

Two Artists Ask the Question: What Makes Us Human?
What does it mean to be made of flesh and bone? What is the true nature of the human animal? In the inaugural exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, appropriately titled 6×6, artists Ed Smith and Charlie Grosso tackle these questions head on, while using radically different mediums and approaches.

Both artists have enjoyed successful careers documenting the visceral and fleshy boundaries of humanity. In their exhibition, Flesh and Bone, Smith’s large-scale bronze sculptures and Grosso’s gorgeously saturated photographs of food markets come together to display both the strength and the fragility that is an essential aspect of the contemporary human experience.

Images by Charlie Grosso

WEEK #2 September 15-21, 2011


Unravelling the Magic of Narrative
Every narrative involves the powerful interplay of memory and introspection that allows us to make sense of the world by defining who we are and how we fit in. In the second exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled “6×6”, artists Kesha Bruce and Jane Zweibel offer viewers a contemporary entryway to the rich tradition of storytelling in art.

The narratives Bruce and Zweibel present in Talking To Myself are composed of a mysterious mix of elements culled from the intimate terrain of memory, personal mythology, and the mundane remnants of everyday life.

From Zweibel’s large format figurative paintings on canvas that pay homage to Caravaggio to Bruce’s small delicate works on paper that render character and place through the use of minimalist text, each work in the exhibition speaks and relates to the next like non-linear chapters of a novel that doesn’t easily settle neatly into a comfortable beginning, middle, and end.

WEEK #3 September 22-28, 2011


Meditations on a Peaceful Apocalypse
Landscape, nature, ecology, and environmental issues have long been a powerful source of inspiration for contemporary artists. In the third exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled 6×6, the artwork manages to address all of these contemporary issues with uncommon beauty and grace.

In Second Nature, artists Kris Graves and Karen Rudd present a vision that is simultaneously apocalyptic and hopeful. Graves presents a series of hauntingly sublime photographs of the Icelandic landscape that enable the viewer to reconsider their relationship to the earth. Likewise, Rudd’s strikingly realistic sculptures of life-size cedar tree stumps, created from reclaimed cardboard and wood glue, express sadness and irony, but also the serene idea that nature is somehow restoring itself.

Images by Kris Graves

WEEK #4 September 29-October 5, 2011

The Art of Participation
From Cubism to Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s soup cans, Pop Art still holds court as one of the most relevant art movements of the twenty-first century due to its on-going dialogue with contemporary popular culture. In their exhibition, Please Stand By, artists Stacia Yeapanis and anonymous internet video artist Readymade 777 take this discussion a step further by using appropriation and transformation to reveal how viewers and users of cultural products like TV shows, movies, and video games, not only make meaning from the images they digest, but often become active participants in cultural production themselves.

Yeapanis’ hand-made cross-stitches are painstaking recreations of a single frame from TV shows such as Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Xena: Warrior Princess, using the decorative handicraft of embroidery as a symbol of how far we have invited and incorporated these fictional TV characters into our personal lives. Similarly, artist Readymade777 cuts together everything from VHS home video footage, film clips, 50’s TV commercial, to pornography turning them into disorienting and often harrowing digital assemblages that jolt the viewer into making visual and psychological connections between images and genres.

WEEK #5 October 6-12, 2011

Fierce Bliss Without Boundaries
Some art exhibitions are shaped around a singular theme or even around a particular medium, but in the fifth exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled “6×6”, the artworks presented are bound by their unflinching sense of immediacy and a vibrant, primal relationship to their subjects.

In Violently Happy artist Jacqueline Norheim’s complex, multi-layered paintings use texture and manipulated imagery, to explore spacial relationships and the mystery created by the use of negative space, bold energetic gesture and varied degrees of opacity. The result is a collection of bold, energetic paintings that straddle the subtle line between order and chaos.

Well known for her highly sought after “10 Minute Portraits”, Cara Lynn Kleid’s work is part portrait session and part performance. Each of her colorful, playful, yet earnest drawings captures the intense vulnerability shared by both the artist and the subject as they sit quietly, face to face, during each drawing session. Likewise, her revealing mixed-media paintings investigate emotion, identity, and the human face as a boundary and portal between our internal and external worlds.

WEEK #6 October 13-18, 2011

Where Nostalgia Meets Suspicion
In Of Faith, Power, and Glory, the sixth and final exhibition of Baang and Burne Contemporary’s six-week art event, titled “6×6”, the gallery juxtaposes photographs of Russia of a by-gone era with
strikingly painted portraits of dictators and tyrants inspired by present day “bad guys” of contemporary society.

Photographed over the course of multiple visits since 2007, Michael Kirchoff’s ongoing body of work “An Enduring Grace” explores the landscape and cultural heritage of Russia. Inspired by a childhood fascination with television broadcasts from the then Soviet Union and images of Moscow’s Red Square, Kirchoff approaches the contemporary Russian landscape with a nostalgia and wonderment that is captured on the transient Polaroid film.

In stark contrast to Kirchoff’s Russia of endless beauty and rich history, Meyer Uranovsky’s portraits of archetypal villains such as army generals, politicians, judges, kings, and dictators flanked by their henchmen, seem eerily to have been extracted from Kirchoff’s brooding Russian landscapes. Uranovsky refuses to name names, but his works, which reference the tradition of state portraiture, bring to mind Stalin, Franco, Mussolini, and Castro. But even as Uranovsky paints these characters with suspicion his role remains more that of a satirist than judge.

Images by Michael Kirchoff

Erik Boker

I am a big fan of Erik Boker’s work. It’s smart, focused, funny, and spot on. I’ve shown his dissected tooth paste tubes in my classes to much laughter and fascination and I appreciate that Erik is looking at what we consume and reflecting it back to us in a way that makes us see it. I am featuring work from several series to give you a taste of what Mr. Boker is serving up–the first series, Ascencion of the Brand, is featured in Klompching Gallery’s Fresh exhibition in New York.

Erik was born in New York and raised in Alabama. After receiving a degree in anthropology from Vanderbilt University and in between extensive nomadic ramblings he earned his second degree in fine art and photography at the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. And he may be heading off to Holland soon to work on a Masters degree.

Erik’s work has been has been exhibited extensively in New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Santa Fe, Toronto, Montreal, London, Italy, and Taiwan, including the Center for Fine Art Photography, The Griffin Museum of Photography, photo-eye Gallery, The Lennox Contemporary, Galerie Art Mur, the Lodz Art Centre, and the India International Center (New Delhi).

ASCENCION OF THE BRAND: T-shirts collected and preserved between the years 2001-2011 in various regions of America showcase a trend that represents the ultimate deification of either a well-known detergent or coffee company, or else hints at how thin the line has become between commodity and religion.








PRODUCT DISSECTIONS, PART I: This project is an ongoing exploration of the roles of art, science, nature, the consumer, the institution, product, fabrication, reality, taxonomy, and our relationships with seemingly insignificant objects and materials that affect us daily. It approaches issues of anatomy and the figure, psychology, the nature of science, and archaeology, while offering a revealed view within the plastic skins of what we consume, as the delicate tension between death, health, and hygiene collide with the extremities of marketing, with bold, impractical, purposeless colors sometimes reminiscent of expressionist painting. I am interested in the notions of foundation, institution, and the nature of art as commercial product. I am continually inspired by the function and treatment of both nature and the unnatural in our environment, and I continue to explore our understanding of their roles, and the inherent beauty, humor, and horror that lies within them.

© Erik Boker, Colgate Junior, Bubble Fruit, 2008

© Erik Boker, Oral B Stages (For Kids), Bubble Gum Magic, Disney Princesses, 2008

© Erik Boker, Aquafresh, Anti-Cavity, 2008

© Erik Boker, Colgate Max Fresh, Kiss Me Mint, 2008

© Erik Boker, Crest Whitening Expressions, Extreme Herbal Mint, 2008

ANIMAL SNACK KINGDOM: By way of taxonomically surveying the existing variation of phyla and species in the animal snack kingdom, this work takes the role of the museum into the realm of chewy nature and its “natural flavors,” “strong, satisfying sours,” and yellow #5, with the idea of pop culture as a catalyst to an evolution of species. This series continues to explore curiosity and a scientific wonder, though devoid of really any nature or natural substance, and with determination of cataloguing new discovery and nomenclature in this unknown world of glucosic, preserved natural forms that have befuddled scientists for generations.

© Erik Boker, Insectae, 2011

© Erik Boker, Oceanicae, 2011

© Erik Boker, Familia Bears, 2011

© Erik Boker, Reptiliae, 2011

© Erik Boker, Carnivores, 2011