Tag Archives: Argentina

Demolición. Three Argentine Photographers

Marcos López, Tía Delia, Santa Fé, 1992

There is a current show up in Buenos Aires called, Demolición. En pos de una fotografía ¿argentina? It features three Argentine photographers, Alberto Goldenstein, Marcos Lopez, and Ataulfo Perez Aznar and was the brainchild of Guillermo Ueno whose class I took a few years ago at the Centro Cultural Rojas.

I post about this show mostly because I came across a post on the blog, RƎV: Imagenes de Arte Contemporanea en Argentina which shows a very good selection of installation shots of the show. The blog is written by the indomintable Gabriela Schevach, artist, photographer and writer. I will definitely be adding it to my blog reader (does anyone use those anymore?).

Mata Matayoshi & Ofuro

Recently I got an email flyer for a small exhibit in Buenos Aires that advertised photos, music and empanadas. Boy, did I feel nostalgic. The show in question was Te Toca Lavar, by photographers Mata Matayoshi and Victoria Abalde, friends of mine from when I lived in Argentina. Mata runs an excellent film scanning service called Ofuro that I’ve used and will do so again the next time I’m down there. There’s a group on facebook, where Mata uploads scans of his own photos as well as those of his clients:

Mata Matayoshi

 

Mata Matayoshi

Mata Matayoshi

Mata Matayoshi

 

 

Now at ASU

Sorry for the absence of posting. Search Engine Optimization . I’ve been busy with grad school…

My student ID card

In August I started a three year MFA program at Arizona State University. A couple of years ago I started thinking I would like to have a more formal education in photography. Last year I came to the US and I spent a month looking at various schools. Of all the ones I visited, ASU was the program that I liked the best. I applied and, luckily, was accepted. And so, since August, I’ve been in Phoenix (technically Tempe) studying.

I hope to keep blogging about what I’m working on and also goings on in Argentina, although I’ll have to do so from a distance.

Myriam Meloni – Genealogy of a fallen tree

Myriam Meloni is an Italian photojournalist based in Buenos Aires. We took a class together back in 2009 and would laugh at the over-the-top pronouncements of our (nevertheless, very good) professor. Since then I’ve been following her work and enjoying what I see. I recently saw that she updated her website and discovered a series I like a lot; Genealogy of a fallen tree, which looks at the effects of deforestation on the indigenous population in Argentina’s northern Chaco region.

© Myriam Meloni

© Myriam Meloni

© Myriam Meloni

© Myriam Meloni

Mariano Brizzola

Severral of my photo-friends in Buenos Aires good me hooked on this Facebook group called Solo Analogas which is Spanish for “Film Only” (roughly speaking). Through the group, I recently discovered the work of Argentine Mariano Brizzola. Working with a 35mm camera, Brizzola’s pictures have a nostalgic feel. I’m not sure you could get away with this in the US anymore, but Argentina (and even more so, Uruguay) really still looks like this.

© Mariano Brizzola

© Mariano Brizzola

© Mariano Brizzola

© Mariano Brizzola

Brizzola’s website redirects to his flickr page, which somehow seems appropriate. He eschews the modern obsession of organizing his photos into “projects”. Each one is its own, delightful, thing. Also check out this interview (in Spanish) on the Uruguayan website AKA.

Feria de Libros in Lima

The same Feria de Libros that I blogged about last year came to Lima a couple of weeks ago as part of the ongoing Photography Biennial. The feria, which is run by Argentine artist Julieta Escardó, features small, independently published books, mostly from photographers in Argentina, although this edition included several books by Peruvian photographers.

Feria de Libros in Lima

Feria de Libros in Lima

The fair was held at the Centro de la Imagen. Unlike the version in Buenos Aires, here, none of the books were for sale. It was a bit like an Alexandrian library only, instead of copying scrolls of papayrus, I sat there with my digital camera snapping photos of pages from books that I liked.

Here’s a few:

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde was my favorite book. It documents various decaying buildings from the 19th century and before in Lima’s historic core.

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde

Epitafios by Gladys Alavardo Jourde

Something that I find interesting about both Lima and Buenos Aires is that each, with over a third of their respective countrys’ population, dominate all aspects industry, culture, politics and finance. It’s like each city is New York, Detroit, Los Angeles, and Washington all rolled into one. Depending on where you go  you can find elements that resonate with each. In the case of Lima, new development has shunned the historic core and a bounce-back wave of gentrification has yet to occur. In this situation, there’s a huge number of historic buildings which sit in a rather shabby state. Alvarado’s book does an execellent job of documenting both the beauty of these spaces, their inhabitants, and the tragedy of their decay. Also, the book dummy on view was really wonderfully printed. I hope it gets published.

Lucila Heinberg’s (Argentina) book Hacia recounts her journey in through China. Using expired film, the photos show a very personal, intimate view of her experiences in China.

Lucila Heinberg – Hacia

Lucila Heinberg – Hacia

Lucila Heinberg – Hacia

Lucila Heinberg – Hacia

Galeria Centrico has a small online gallery of this work. I also blogged about Heinberg’s series Dormidos last year.

David Mansell-Moullin’s book Lines in the Sand looks at peripheral settlements in Lima and how they sit on the landscape.

David Mansell-Moullin – Lines in the Sand

David Mansell-Moullin – Lines in the Sand

The subject matter is similar to Musuk Note’s Decierto series which I blogged about recently but is less abstract, more into the nuts and bolts of how these plots of land get developed by their inhabitants. Mansell-Moullin’s website has a nice slideshow of the work and he’s also got a blog detailing a lot of his work process.

Futuramic by Aldo Paparella (great name!) features lucious black and white photographs of retro-futuristic automobiles from the 1950s.

Aldo Paparella – Futuramic

Aldo Paparella – Futuramic

I got really excited to see that Martin Weber’s Ecos del Interior has been published by Ediciones Lariviere. I hope this makes it to the US so I can get a copy.

Martin Weber – Ecos del Interior

Italian photojournalist Myriam Meloni has a book, Fragil, documenting the social decay resulting from paco use in Buenos Aires (paco is their version of crack).

Myriam Meloni – Fragil

Myriam Meloni – Fragil

Myriam Meloni – Fragil

There sems to be a whole sub-genre of photographers documenting their grandparent’s homes. I suppose the combination of nostalgia + access is irrisistible. By my count, there were four books dealing with this theme at the book fair, the nicest of which was Bulnes by Luciana Betesh.

Luciana Betesh – Bulnes

Luciana Betesh – Bulnes

Luciana Betesh – Bulnes

There were a ton more books, of course. It’s a great fair and my only complaint is that it isn’t held more often and in more places.

Seven Days of Strange Landscapes

From thousands of spiders in Australia and a massive ruptured ice wall in Argentina to the aftermath of the U.S. tornadoes and the wake of last year’s Japanese tsunami, TIME’s photo department presents a selection of surprising and surreal vistas from the past week.

Photographer #424: RES

Raúl Eduardo Stolkiner, better known as RES, 1957, Argentina, is a conceptual and fine-art photographer based in Buenos Aires. He studied photography at the Spilimbergo Art School and at Casa del Lago, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. His series Conatus was produced in collaboration with Constanza Piaggio. The photographs are recreations of iconic paintings by artists as da Vinci and Picasso. The images are not exact copies, RES made alterations to the original works that reinterpret and recontextualize the subject through contemporary perspectives on philosophy, politics and spirituality. One of his first bodies of work, Donde están e imanes, was the result of his return to Argentina after he had been exiled in 1978 to Mexico. His work has been shown in numerous exhibitions worldwide and has been published in a vast amount of publications. In the past nine years he also released his work in four different monographs. The following images come from the series Conatus, Plantas Vestidas and Donde están e imanes.


Website: www.resh.com.ar