Tag Archives: April

Behind the Cover: Marco Grob Photographs Benjamin Netanyahu

In late April, Marco Grob traveled to Jerusalem to photograph Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for this week’s cover story by TIME’s managing editor Rick Stengel.

It was Grob’s first meeting with the Israeli leader, whom he found friendly and charismatic, albeit a little hesitant about the camera lens. “Powerful people normally get shy during sittings because they’re giving control to a photographer,” Grob said. “You could tell that he didn’t love being in front of the camera, which is not unusual for Netanyahu because he’s in a position of such power.”

The photo shoot lasted about 20 minutes and took place at Netanyahu’s residence. And though he has photographed countless celebrities and politicians throughout his career, Grob was taken aback by the number of security guards present at the shoot. “It was very intense,” Grob says. “But he’s one of the most protected men in the world—and there’s a good reason for that.”

Read more: Bibi’s Choice

Child’s Play at the Panopticon Gallery

I am thrilled to be part of a new exhibition, Child’s Play, starting April 12th (with the opening on APril 19th) at the Panopticon Gallery in Boston. This exhibition will feature photographs by Jane Tuckerman, Aline Smithson, Grace Weston, Lisette de Boisblanc and David Levinthal and examines how toys are portrayed through contemporary photography. The exhibition will run through May 28th, 2012.

“When you were a child, I suppose many of you had a favorite toy. Depending on what generation you grew up in, it could have been a number of things, from a Barbie doll to a Star Wars figure, a toy truck or a dinosaur, a Matchbox car, or even a Beanie Baby. But what happened to all of those toys? Do you still have them, were they passed down to another generation, or did they get discarded or sadly lost?

Images by Lisette de Boisblanc

Images by Grace Weston

Images by David Levinthal

Images by Jane Tuckerman

Images by Aline Smithson

Carrie Levy at Daniel Cooney in NYC. Closing April 9

Carrie Levy

You Before All

Through April 9
Daniel Cooney Fine Art
511 W. 25th St., New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212-255-8158
www.danielcooneyfineart.com

Jess. 2010. Carrie Levy

From The New Yorker:

Levy’s photographs of men have always been oddly fraught. In a new series of mostly small black-and-white images, her naked subjects twist, strain, and collapse in front of the camera in attitudes that suggest both agony and ecstasy, torture and sex. Inspired in part by vintage medical and forensic photographs, the pictures also zero in on details familiar from exposés on mental hospitals: contorted limbs, silent screams, drool. Levy is exploring female power and male vulnerability here, but her work doesn’t feel cruel or sensational. Instead, it’s tender and genuinely moving.

Ethan. 2010. Carrie Levy

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Carrie Levy at Daniel Cooney in NYC. Closing April 9

Carrie Levy

You Before All

Through April 9
Daniel Cooney Fine Art
511 W. 25th St., New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212-255-8158
www.danielcooneyfineart.com

Jess. 2010. Carrie Levy

From The New Yorker:

Levy’s photographs of men have always been oddly fraught. In a new series of mostly small black-and-white images, her naked subjects twist, strain, and collapse in front of the camera in attitudes that suggest both agony and ecstasy, torture and sex. Inspired in part by vintage medical and forensic photographs, the pictures also zero in on details familiar from exposés on mental hospitals: contorted limbs, silent screams, drool. Levy is exploring female power and male vulnerability here, but her work doesn’t feel cruel or sensational. Instead, it’s tender and genuinely moving.

Ethan. 2010. Carrie Levy

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July-December 2011 Work Scholar Session: Deadline to apply extended to April 15th

Picture 1 of 3

The deadline for applications to the Fall 2011 Work Scholar program has been extended to Friday, April 15th. The Work Scholar program at Aperture is a unique opportunity to be introduced to the many facets of the photography, non-profit and publishing fields. Following placement in each of Aperture’s departments, Work Scholars are involved in a range of tasks in the areas of design, editing, circulation, development, sales and marketing. The program also includes a number of special events, curator-led tours of exhibits, special studio visits with Aperture artists and a chance to get involved in the arts and photo world in New York. In the 2011 Spring session Work Scholar visited galleries in the art district of Chelsea and will be given a tour of The Museum of the City of New York show Moveable Feast by the exhibition’s curators.

Click here for more information on Aperture’s Work Scholar program including how to apply

Click for more information on our current events

MOPLA + Smashbox Group Show Deadline Today!

With the official launch of Month of Photography LA coming up in a mere week, the Lucie Foundation is thrilled to present an array of programming including our MOPLA + Smashbox group show. new homes for sale . The submission deadline is today so here’s the last chance for photographers to participate in a MOPLA show in April!

For more information and to submit an entry, please visit the MOPLA site here. Please follow file naming and sizing guidelines. Entries need not fit a specific theme– just show us your best work!

Go See – New York: Berlinde De Bruyckere’s ‘Into One-Another To P.P.P.’ at Hauser & Wirth through April 23, 2011


Berlinde De Bruyckere, Into One-Another I To P.P.P. (2010). All images via Hauser & Wirth

Berlinde De Bruyckere does not hold back when it comes to her art. The human form in her exhibition “Into One-Another To P.P.P.” at Hauser & Wirth is exposed in a series of sculptures expertly rendered in wax. Through experimentation with individuality and mortality, De Bruyckere draws the viewer into her sculptures’ struggle. Also on display are a number of recent works on paper done in watercolor and ink. The exhibition is dedicated to Pier Paolo Pasolini, Italian filmmaker, painter, and poet.


Berlinde De Bruyckere, Into One-Another I To P.P.P. (2010)

More text and images after the jump…

De Bruyckere has drawn on Pasolini’s artistic portrayals, which were often graphic and disturbing, much in the way her fragmented sculptures are. Three sculptures, all named as numbered variations to the exhibition’s title, stand as the centerpiece of the show. De Bruyckere’s figures draw from professional dancers she hired to act as models. The partial bodies are eerily realistic, despite the missing heads and limbs, and the blending incompletion of some features. Interspersed with red marks, the pale tone of the wax gives the sculptures a sickly pallor. Combined with ragged openings and surreal folds in the skin, the color calls to mind corpses. This is particularly true in Into One-Another I To P.P.P., where the shape of a woman’s body on its side looks at rest but for the missing head and the gash running down her side for the entire length of her torso. De Bruyckere often leaves out heads or facial features in her pieces, leaving an unsettling feeling of impersonality.


Berlinde De Bruyckere, Into One-Another III To P.P.P. (2010)

Despite the deathly composition and the absence of a face, the sculptures have a fierce liveliness to their poses, and a strong individuality to their bodies. In Into One-Another III To P.P.P., two forms intersect each other, their torsos combining with outward signs of struggle. Whether the frozen moment is of union or separation isn’t clear, but that uncertainty only serves to heighten the tension in the piece’s motion. Though many parts of the sculpture’s bodies are blurred and left off, some sections are vividly human. The feet and toes of the woman in Into One-Another I To P.P.P. are crafted to include the smallest wrinkle in the skin. The shoulders rising up in Into One-Another III To P.P.P. strain with a human vitality underneath the wax.


Berlinde De Bruyckere, Inside me II (2010)

In a step away from the expected human form, Inside Me II splays out across rough fabric slung between sawhorses, a string of wax sculptures rendered to resemble intestines. The display of innards as a sculpture among the other human forms highlights their sense of anonymity, for men are not recognizable only by their guts. Though the other three sculptures give a sense of vulnerability and exposure, none is as opened up as Inside Me II, which serves to highlight the theme of mortality in the exhibition.


Berlinde De Bruyckere, Romeu ‘my deer’ (2010-2011)

De Bruyckere’s paper works give the viewers some insight into how she views the human form before drawing it out of her sculpting materials. These ink and watercolor pieces depict forms with vaguely recognizable human sections, but cast in sections and posed so that enough is left unknown for the images to have an unsettling quality. As in her sculptures, the figures have no face.

-K. Heiney

Related Links:

Exhibition page [Hauser & Wirth]

View full post on AO Art Observed™

Go See – New York: Ivan Navarro at Paul Kasmin through April 2nd, 2011

Ivan Navarro - Twin Towers - Paul Kasmin
Ivan Navarro Twin Towers (2011) and Desert (Columbia Center) (2011). Via Paul Kasmin Gallery

Chilean-born artist Ivan Navarro‘s “Heaven or Las Vegas” will be on view at Paul Kasmin Gallery through April 2nd, 2011. The exhibition directly follows Navarro’s recent Armory showcase, where his aptly titled work, “The Armory Fence,” was shown through Paul Kasmin. Navarro is currently based in Brooklyn, and “Heaven or Las Vegas” is his first solo exhibition at Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Ivan Navarro - Armory Fence - Paul Kasmin
Ivan Navarro, Armory Fence (2011) site specific installation at the 2011 New York Armory Show. Via L. Streeter, Art Observed

more images and story after the jump…

Ivan Navarro - Shelter - Paul Kasmin
Ivan Navarro, Shelter (2011). Via Paul Kasmin Gallery

Navarro selected twelve internationally recognizable skyscrapers to model his florescent light sculptures, thusly alluding to the global manifestation of Western ambition and expansion. Inspirations for the walled light sculptures include the Jumeriah Emirates Towers in Dubai, the Center in Hong Kong, and the Flatiron Building in New York.


Ivan Navarro, Surrender (Flatiron) (2011). Via Paul Kasmin Gallery

Each work additionally incorporates words or phrases to enhance metaphorical and aesthetic dimensions of architectural simulation. In addition to the use of mirroring and lighting techniques, the words substantiate the illusion of an elevation of over 1,000 feet high.

Ivan Navarro - Homeless Lamp, the Juice Sucker - Paul Kasmin
Ivan Navarro, Homeless Lamp, the Juice Sucker (2005). Via The Saatchi Gallery

In this exhibition, Navarro incorporates his repeated platform of political discontent, utilizing the tools of an everyday society to allude to underlying danger and violence. At Paul Kasmin, the macabre merits of previously showcased work have literally taken on a new dimension, with the illusion of three-dimensionality suggesting that even ideological structure is illusory.

Ivan Navarro - Pink Electric Chair - Paul Kasmin
Ivan Navarro, Pink Electric Chair (2006). Via Phillips de Pury

Navarro has used florescent lights in previous works, which arguably “illuminate”  symbolic contradictions. However, his Armory piece prior to the current Kasmin exhibition used structure rather than light to represent entrapment. The fence does not flash or glow, but its confining and linear structure sends a silent message. The work is a chronological precursor to the current exhibition at Paul Kasmin, and also introduces a new element of structural integrity to the traditional themes Ivan Navarro has used in the past.

Related Links
Press Release [Paul Kasmin Gallery]
Artist’s Bio [The Saatchi Gallery]
AO On Site photoset/news summary – New York: Armory Show – The Day One Preview, March 2nd, 2011 [Art Observed]

A. Bregman

View full post on AO Art Observed™