Tag Archives: Aperture Gallery

The Dutch Photobook with Frits Gierstberg at Aperture

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Good photobooks require having good photographs. But good photobooks need more than that. Photobooks, when done well, are not merely collections of photographs. They are pieces of art in their own right, which means that the contributions of the non-photographers are crucial.

–Joerg Colberg, in his review of The Dutch Photobook (Aperture 2012)

This Wednesday, June 13, 2012, Frits Gierstberg, curator of the Netherlands Photomuseum, comes to Aperture Gallery to speak on the important collaborations between graphic designers, printers, and Dutch photographers that have earned Dutch photobooks so much praise.

Gierstberg, who co-authored Aperture’s latest “book on books,” The Dutch Photobook: A Thematic Selection from 1945 Onwards along with Rik Suermondt, will be explaining some methodology behind his selection in the text, and discussing not only those  books included, but omitted as well.

We’re most excited for the hands-on reception after the presentation during which audience members will be offered a special viewing of a selection of contemporary Dutch photobooks. Joining Gierstberg will be special guest Dutch photographers featured in the book, Jacqueline Hassink, author of the 2009 Aperture monograph Car Girls, and Dana Lixenberg, whose monographs Jeffersonville Indiana and Last Days of Sishmaref won Best Dutch Book Design in 2005 and 2008, respectively.

Attendees will also receive complementary copies of Aperture’s The Photobook Review Issue 002, edited by publisher Markus Schaden, which features extensive coverage of photobook studies and photobook dummy-making.

Read Joerg Colberg’s full review of The Dutch Photobook on Concientious. The work has also been reviewed on Photo-Eye Blog, where you can flip through a few spreads as well.

The Dutch Photobook: Presentation and reception with Frits Gierstberg
Wednesday, June 13, 2012
6:30 p.m.

FREE

Aperture Gallery
547 West 27th Street, 4th floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

Aperture Announces its Fall 2012 Releases

For Fall 2012 Aperture presents a list of new and re-issued publications, from the startling and fresh, to new editions and long-awaited anthologies. Read more about our upcoming releases, and view a slideshow of Fall 2012 cover art below.

Upcoming titles include:

A New American Picture by Doug Rickard
101 Tragedies of Enrique Metinides
Petrochemical America by Richard Misrach and Kate Orff
The Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin
Life’s a Beach by Martin Parr
Labyrinth: Daido Moriyama
Aperture Magazine Anthology: The Minor White Years, 1952–1976
The Garden at Orgeval by Paul Strand
• Unbuilt: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island, Photographs by Barney Kulok, Essay by Steven Holl

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September 2012

A New American Picture by Doug Rickard


Doug Rickard’s A New American Picture offers a startling and fresh perspective on American street photography. While on first glance the work looks reassuringly familiar and well within the traditional bounds of the genre, his methodology is anything but conventional. All of the images are appropriated from Google Street View; over a period of two years, Rickard took advantage of the technology platform’s comprehensive image archive to virtually drive the unseen and overlooked roads of America, bleak places that are forgotten, economically devastated, and abandoned. With an informed and deliberate eye, Rickard finds and decodes these previously photographed scenes of urban and rural decay. He rephotographs the machine-made images as they appear on his computer screen, framing and freeing them from their technological origins.

12 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (31.8 x 24.8 cm); 
144 pages, 90 four-color images; 
Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-219-2
; $60.00; 
September 2012; 
Rights: North America


101 Tragedies of Enrique
 Metinides


101 Tragedies of Enrique Metinides is Enrique Metinides’ choice of the 101 key images from his life photographing crime scenes and accidents in Mexico for local newspapers and the nota roja (or “red pages,” for their bloody content) crime press. Accompanying each image, extended captions give his account of the situation depicted, describing the characters and life of the streets, the sadness of families, the criminals, and the heroism of emergency workers—revealing much about himself in the process. Having received his first camera at the age of ten, Metinides became a capable street photographer by the time he was twelve, already working with police and firefighters to get his best shots. Now also found in museum collections around the world, his images are compelling, immediate, sometimes shocking, and always authentic. Selected photographs are also paired with their original newsprint tearsheets, collected by Metinides, the typography of which have inspired the design of this book. The photographs have been compiled by Trisha Ziff, a filmmaker and curator who knows Metinides well, and who also contributes an essay about his life, work, and personality.

8 1/2 x 10 3/8 in. (21.6 x 26.4 cm); 
192 pages, 
150 four-color images; 
Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-211-6
; $50.00/£35.00
; September 2012; 
Rights: World


Petrochemical America
by Richard Misrach and Kate Orff


Petrochemical America features Richard Misrach’s haunting photographic record of Louisiana’s Chemical Corridor, accompanied by landscape architect Kate Orff’s Ecological Atlas—a series of “speculative drawings” developed through research and mapping of data from the region. Their joint effort depicts and unpacks the complex cultural, physical, and economic ecologies along 150 miles of the Mississippi River, from Baton Rouge to New Orleans, an area of intense chemical production that first garnered public attention as “Cancer Alley” when unusual occurrences of cancer were discovered in the region.

This collaboration has resulted in an unprecedented, multilayered document presenting a unique narrative of visual information. Petrochemical America offers in-depth analysis of the causes of decades of environmental abuse along the largest river system in North America. Even more critically, the project offers an extensively researched guidebook to the way in which the petrochemical industry has permeated every facet of contemporary life.

 An exhibition coinciding with the release of the book will take place at Aperture Gallery in fall 2012.

13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (34.3 x 26.7 cm); 216 pages (plus 24-page insert), 
150 four-color images; Hardcover; ISBN 978-1-59711-191-1; $80.00/£50.00; September 2012; 
Rights: World


The Ballad of Sexual 
Dependency
by Nan Goldin


The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a visual diary chronicling the struggle for intimacy and understanding between friends, family, and lovers—collectively described by Nan Goldin as her “tribe.” Her work describes a world that is visceral, charged, and seething with life. First published in 1986, this reissue recognizes the persistent relevance and freshness of Nan Goldin’s cutting-edge photography.

Over the past twenty-five years, the influence of Ballad on photography and other aesthetic realms has continually grown, making the work a contemporary classic. Nan Goldin’s story of urban life on the fringe was the swan song of an era that reached its peak in the early eighties. Yet it has captured an important element of humanity that is transcendent: a need to connect.

This new edition of The Ballad of Sexual Dependency has been printed using new scans and separations created by master-separator Robert Hennessey from Goldin’s original slides and transparencies, rendering them with unparalleled sumptuousness and impact.

10 x 9 in. (25.4 x 22.9 cm); 
148 pages, 
126 four-color images; 
Clothbound with jacket
; ISBN 978-1-59711-208-6; 
$50.00/£35.00; 
September 2012; 
Rights: World (excluding France)


Life’s a Beach
by Martin Parr


In the United Kingdom, one is never more than seventy-five miles away from the coast. With this much shoreline, it’s not surprising that there is a strong British tradition of photography by the seaside. American photographers may have given birth to street photography, but according to photographer Martin Parr, “in the UK, we have the beach!” Here, he asserts, people can relax, be themselves, and show off all those traces of mildly eccentric British behavior.

First released in a signed and numbered limited-edition run, Life’s a Beach shows Parr at its best, startling us with the moments of captured absurdity and immersing us in the rituals and traditions associated with beach life all over the world. A trade edition will follow in spring 2013.

11 x 9 in. (27.9 x 22.9 cm); 
98 four-color images;
 Slipcased hardcover; 
Signed and numbered limited-edition;
 ISBN 978-1-59711-224-6; 
$150.00/£95.00;
 September 2012;
 Rights: World (excluding France)


October 2012

Labyrinth: Daido Moriyama


Throughout Daido Moriyama’s extensive career, he has continually sought new ways of presenting and recontextualizing his work, frequently recasting his images through the use of different printing techniques, installation, or re-editing and re-formatting. In each iteration, images both old and new take on changed and newly charged significance. This volume, created during preparations for several international survey exhibitions, offers both the photographer and the viewer the opportunity to consider the photographer’s life work in a fresh light.

Moriyama has always sought meaning in the raw accumulation and gestalt of sequences of images. Labyrinth makes public an exercise in reconsideration that the photographer has assigned to himself. In opening up this private process of re-examination to a wider public, Moriyama continues to challenge the viewer and his own practice, as well as the larger mechanisms by which photography functions and creates meaning.

11 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (30 x 35 cm); 
304 pages, 
300 duotone images; 
Paperback with flaps; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-217-8
; $80.00/£50.00; 
October 2012
 Rights: World (excluding Japan)


Aperture Magazine
 Anthology: The Minor White Years, 1952–1976


Published on the occasion of Aperture magazine’s sixtieth anniversary, this is the first anthology of Aperture magazine ever published. This long-awaited volume will provide a selection of the best critical writing from the first twenty-five years of the magazine—the period spanning the tenure of cofounder and editor Minor White.

The texts and visuals in this anthology were selected by Peter C. Bunnell, White’s protégé and an early member of the Aperture staff, who went on to become a major force in photography as an influential writer, curator, and professor. Several documents from Aperture’s founders and individual articles are reproduced in facsimile, and the book is enlivened by other distinctive elements, including a portfolio of each cover, and a selection of epigrams and editorials that appeared at the front of each issue. An extensive index of every contributor to the first twenty-five years of the magazine makes this an indispensible resource.

6 1/2 x 9 3/8 in. (16.5 x 23.8 cm); 
448 pages
, 150 four-color images;
 Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-196-6;
$39.95/£25.00;
 October 2012
 Rights: World


The Garden at Orgeval
by Paul Strand


After a lifetime of working on a series of “collective portraits” in far-flung places such as Mexico; Ghana; Italy; Tir a’Mhurain, Scotland; and his adoptive country, France, an aging Paul Strand decided to concentrate on still lifes and the stony beauty of his own garden at Orgeval, France, as a site in which to distill his discoveries as a photographer. The work that constitutes The Garden at Orgeval is marked by close and careful study of the forms and patterns within nature—of tiny button-shaped flowers, cascading winter branches, and fierce snarls of twigs. While the images bear the same directness and precise vision that is quintessentially Strand, the work also reflects a growing metaphorical turn.

Renowned photographer Joel Meyerowitz—whose own affinity toward Strand’s Orgeval series stems from a lifetime of photographing in different genres and ultimately returning to nature as an enduring subject—has selected the photographs in the book, and he responds to them in an accompanying personal essay, reflecting on issues, including the contemplation of one’s garden, and growing old. Beautifully produced in a modest size, in the manner of a volume of poems, this book’s task is to do credit to Strand’s final work, both as an individual and as a key figure in Modernist photography.

8 x 10 3/8 in. (20.3 x 26.4 cm); 
96 pages, 
42 duotone images 
Clothbound; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-124-9; 
$45.00/£30.00; 
October 2012, Rights: World


Unbuilt: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island
(Photographs by Barney Kulok, Essay by Steven Holl)


In October 2012, Four Freedoms Park—the last design Louis I. Kahn completed before his untimely death in 1974—will open on Roosevelt Island in New York City, over forty years after its commission as a memorial to Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Barney Kulok’s black-and-white photographs of the building site function as a meditation on the materiality and formal underpinnings of Kahn’s architectural thinking. Unbuilt is at once a historical record and a multilayered visual investigation of form and the subtleties of texture—elements of fundamental importance to Kahn’s philosophies. As architect Steven Holl writes, “Kulok’s photographs free the subject matter from a literal interpretation of the site. They stand as ‘Equivalents’ to the words about material, light, and shadow that Louis Kahn often spoke.”

11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.5 cm); 80 pages, 40 duotone images; Hardcover with jacket; Signed and numbered limited edition of 1,000 copies; 987-1-59711-TKT-K; $TK.TK/£TK.TK; October 2012, Rights: World

For all press inquiries please contact:

Barbara Escobar
Publicity and Events Manager
212.946.7123
bescobar(at)aperture.org
publicity(at)aperture.org

 

Dawoud Bey: Picturing People and Harlem, USA

Kenneth; from Class Pictures, 2007 (c) Dawoud Bey

Dawoud Bey, the photographer known for his large-scale portraits of adolescents published in the 2007 monograph Class Pictures, has two solo exhibitions currently on view in the Chicago area that span his nearly four-decade-long career.

First, the Art Institute of Chicago presents Harlem, USA (on view May 2 – September 9, 2012), featuring some of Bey’s earliest work candid;y documenting street life with a tremendous sense of empathy for a neighborhood to which he had great familial ties. The work, which the institute recently acquired for their permanent collection, is exhibited here for the first time since Bey’s first solo show at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. Bey, who teaches at Columbia College, explains in an interview with the Chicago Reader how he found inspiration for this series and for becoming an artist at the Metropolitan Museum’s 1969 exhibition Harlem On My Mind.

In addition, the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago presents Picturing People (on view May 13 – June 24, 2012) a career survey of his work “ranging from chance street encounters to studio portraits,” including a few pieces from his latest series Strangers/Community which features photographs of people from Hyde Park, Chicago, where he now calls home. On Saturday, May 26 Darby English, associate professor of Art History at the University of Chicago and author of How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness (MIT Press, 2007)hosts a free walkthrough of the exhibition.

Find a reviews of both of the exhibitions at the Chicago Reader: ”Two Exhibitions Trace the Journey of Dawoud Bey;” or at Chicago magazine: “A Window into Dawoud Bey’s Photography.

And watch a three-part video series on our Vimeo page in which Bey, in conversation with Carrie Mae Weems at Aperture Gallery (February of 2008 during his exhibition of Class Pictures), discusses his approach to portraiture through the Harlem series, how he collaborates with subjects to highlight gestures, and how his subjects end up reacting to the project.

Aperture magazine subscribers can also read philosopher and art critic Arthur C. Danto’s analysis of Harlem, USA in issue 189.

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Harlem, USA
Exhibition on view:
May 2 – September 9, 2012

The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois
(312) 629-6100

—–

Picturing People
Exhibition on view:
May 13 – June 24, 2012

Gallery Walkthrough with Darby English
Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 12:00 pm
FREE

The Renaissance Society
5811 S. Ellis Avenue
Bergman Gallery, Cobb Hall 418
Chicago, Illinois
(773) 702-8670


Eirik Johnson: Camps & Cabins Artist Talk

Elwha River Dam, Washington; from Sawdust Mountain, 2009 © Eirik Johnson

Seattle native and 2012 Neddy Award winner Eirik Johnson presents an artist talk at G. Gibson Gallery this Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 2:00 pm where his third solo exhibition Camps & Cabins, large scale photographs of Pacific Northwest mushroom hunters and their makeshift structures, is currently on view (through May 26, 2012).

Johnson, the photographer behind the 2009 monograph Sawdust Mountain, has had a long history documenting the Pacific Northwest, earning himself a role as forerunner of the second generation of topographic photographers. Sawdust Mountain was a four-year exploration of the “tenuous relationship between industries reliant upon natural resources and the communities they support,” throughout Oregon, Washington, and Northern California, he explains in a video interview conducted at Aperture Gallery.

Work from that series has since been made into a limited-edition print, Freshly Felled Trees, as well as a limited-edition portfolio of three archival pigment prints, Adult Books, Firewood, and Truck for Sale, (Port Angeles, Washington), Weyerhaeuser Sorting Yard Along the Chehalis River, (Cosmopolis, Washington), and The Road to Forks, (Washington), all available at Aperture.

Johnson’s portfolio, West Oakland Walk, exploring the beauty of an urban landscape shaped by poverty, was also featured in Aperture issue 185.

Read a brief review of Camps & Cabins in Seattle Weekly or Visual Art Source, and hear what Johnson has to say about the project himself in a Q&A with CityArts magazine.

Artist Talk:
Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 2:00 pm
FREE

Exhibition on view:
April 19 – May 26, 2012

G. Gibson Gallery
300 South Washington Street
Seattle, Washington 98104
(206) 587-5751

Delpire & Co. Opens @ Aperture, Throughout NYC

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Aperture Gallery was abuzz Wednesday evening, hosting the much-anticipated New York City launch of Delpire & Co., the citywide, multi-venue retrospective of the life and work of legendary editor, curator and publisher, Robert Delpire. Following presentations in Arles and Paris, Delpire & Co. arrives to New York City with representation at six venues throughout Manhattan.

Aperture’s Wednesday opening was the first of the week (followed by Thursday night openings at the French Embassy, and Gallery at Hermes), welcoming a strong roster of photography legends and pillars of the photographic community. Sarah Moon, Mary Ellen Mark, and Josef Koudelka were in attendance, standing alongside their own seminal works on view, as well as celebrated photographers Bruce Davidson and Susan Meiselas. Multiple films by filmmaker/photographer Sarah Moon were on screen, including 1970’s TV spots directed by Moon for Cacharel (7 min), as well as “Le Montreur d’images (The Go-Between)” (2009), her feature length documentary on husband Robert Delpire.



Peter Barberie
, Curator of Photographs for the Philadelphia Art Museum was in attendance Wednesday evening, as well as Jeff Hirsch of FotoCare, and Wendy Byrne, former designer for Aperture Foundation. Special thanks to exhibition producer Mike Derez, and Project Coordinator Agnès Gagnès of Idéodis.

Delpire & Co. runs through June at venues throughout the city. Like us on Facebook to view a full album of photos from the opening.

›› Click here for details on all the exhibitions and events.
›› Join the conversation on Instagram and Twitter using #Delpire
›› The New Yorker presents a stunning and concise slideshow summary of books and photographs from among the displays at Aperture, Hermès, Pace/MacGill, and Howard Greenberg.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

Delpire & Co., Opening Tonight



 

Delpire season is upon us.

Tonight Aperture Gallery launches the New York City run of Delpire & Co., opening their W27th street space to the public, showcasing a rich, multimedia exhibition celebrating the revered curator, editor, publisher, and overall champion of photography, Robert Delpire.
In the next several weeks, a comprehensive retrospective of Delpire’s career will be exhibited across four venues in New York City: Aperture Gallery, The Gallery at Hermès, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, and La Maison Française. Concurrent with Delpire & Co., Pace/MacGill and Howard Greenberg will have exhibitions on view in celebration of Robert Delpire’s life and work.

Here’s what you can expect to see throughout New York City:

 

Aperture Gallery


On view: May 9 through July 19

Highlights: Classical and seminal publications by now-iconic photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, William Klein, Robert Frank (see: “The Americans”), Josef Koudelka, and Sarah Moon. Delpire’s work with magazines will also be featured, including the very first issue of Neuf (founded by Robert Delpire at the ripe age of 23), and Nouvel Observateur Spécial Photo, as well as advertising projects for diverse clients from Cacharel, Citroën, L’Oréal, and the French Ministry of Culture.

 

Cultural Services of the French Embassy


On view: May 11 through June 6

Highlights: The embassy will be exhibiting the original French editions of beloved illustrator Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are and Crocodile Tears.


The Gallery at Hermès/Fondation d’entreprise Hermès


On view: May 11 through July 19

Highlights: Robert Delpire’s famed Photo Poche series is on view, as well as prints from contemporary photographers such as Harry Gruyaert, Jehsong Baak, Michel Vanden Eeckhout, Michael Ackerman, Francesco Zizola, Raymond Depardon, Robert Doisneau, Paolo Pellegrin, Marc Riboud.

 

La Maison Française of New York University


On view: May 18 through July 19

Highlights: This exhibition focuses on the Poche Illustrateur series, celebrating notable illustrators such as Roman Cieślewicz, Honoré Daumier, Etienne Delessert, Guy Peellaert, and Saul Steinberg.

 

› In addition, two supporting exhibitions will be on view; Sarah Moon at Howard Greenberg Gallery, featuring new work, and Pace/MacGill Gallery will exhibit works by prominent photographers such as Robert Frank, Josef Koudelka, Duane Michals, Paolo Roversi, and Alfred Stieglitz.

Visual Supplement: This week in the magazine The New Yorker ran photographs by Sarah Moon and Lee Freidlander, both of which are part of exhibitions celebrating the work of Delpire. Online, The New Yorker presents a stunning and concise slideshow summary of books and photographs from among the displays at Aperture, Hermès, Pace/MacGill, and Howard Greenberg.

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Delpire & Co. is coproduced by Rencontres d’Arles, la Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Delpire Editeur, and Aperture Foundation.Delpire & Co. has been made possible with the support of the National Endowment for the Arts, Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Etant donnés: The French-American Fund for Contemporary Art, the E.T. Harmax Foundation, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Sarah Moon: Film Screenings

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“Moon’s voice, above all, is an intensely personal one, whispering, rather than shouting, about an imagined world where preternaturally lovely, romanesque heroines inhabit isolated and, more often than not, fictional landscapes.” — “Frocks and Fantasy: The Photographs of Sarah Moon

It wasn’t until sometime around 1970 that Sarah Moon, the award-winning artist, photographer and filmmaker, first picked up a camera. Her first photographs were portraits of friends – who also happened to be models. She at the time was working as a model as well, (in London and Paris, 1960-1966) working among some of fashion photography’s most legendary names, Helmut Newton, Irving Penn and Guy Bourdin included. “Somebody lent me a camera,” she says, “and while we waited between shots, I took pictures.”

More than forty years later, her ethereal and enigmatic images are those of a living legend, whose uniquely individual vision informed publications like Nova and the Sunday Times Magazine, later that of the fashion house Maison Cacharel. Her work has appeared everywhere from French Elle to British Vogue, in collaboration with designer names from Chanel to Comme des Garcons. Moon’s body of work, which includes commercial photography, as well as celebrated works in video and film, has exhibited worldwide since 1982. These films—many based upon fairy tales—are a testament to her grande dame status, the years-earned luxury of creative autonomy.

All images © copyright Sara Moon, Little Red Riding Hood

Aperture, in conjunction with Howard Greenberg Gallery, is pleased to present an evening of film and videos by the award-winning artist. Sarah Moon will be present at Aperture Gallery to screen The Red Thread, Black Riding Hood, and Le Montreur D’Images (The Go-Between), a documentary on her husband, the celebrated publisher Robert Delpire, whose own legacy is the subject of the concurrent multi-venue exhibition, Delpire & Co.

———

Sarah Moon: Film Screenings
Friday, May 11, 2012

6:00 pm

FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
New York, New York

6:00The Red Thread and Black Riding Hood
6:30: Intermission
7:00Le Montreur D’Images (The Go-Between)

›› Le Montreur D’Images will also be continuously screened as part of the exhibition Delpire & Co. at Aperture Gallery and Bookstore, on view May 10–July 19, 2012.

›› Sarah Moon: Now and Then will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery,  May 11–June 16, 2012.