Tag Archives: Alex Webb

Features and Essays | August 2012

Incredible work by Aaron Huey in National Geographic magazine’s August issue…

Photo © Aaron Huey

Aaron Huey: In The Shadow of the Wounded Knee (NGM) ‘ After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship’ | Huey on ‘Photographing, and Listening to, the Lakota’ on the Lens blog with some frames not on the NGM edit, here.

Stephanie Sinclair from Yemen in NGM September…

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair: Yemen: Days of Reckoning (NGM) ‘The ancients praised Yemen for its beauty and stability. Today the nation is close to becoming a failed state.’

Magnum’s Alex Webb shot East London for NatGeo’s August issue to coincide with the London 2012 Olympics…

Photo © Alex Webb

Alex Webb: East London (NGM) ‘The “other London”—gritty, gratified, but with a rising cool index—gets ready for its close-up as the venue of the Summer Olympics’

Syria.

Reuters’ Goran Tomasevic has been doing strong work in Syria during the last two weeks. One of his photos from Monday reminded me an old Nachtwey frame… You can see the Side by Side here.. The below one is from last Sunday and ran on the cover of the NYT and IHT…

Photo © Goran Tomasevic / Reuters

Goran Tomasevic: The Battle for Aleppo (Reuters)

Two, slightly more viewer friendly, galleries of Tomasevic’s Syria work on the Guardian and Telegraph websites…

Goran Tomasevic: Syria’s Civil War (Guardian)

Goran Tomasevic: Aleppo (Telegraph)

Nicole Tung’s Aleppo series on Lightbox beginning of last week….I and Olivier Laurent interviewed Tung yesterday about working in Syria and Aleppo specifically. You can read the interview here.

Photo © Nicole Tung

Nicole Tung: A Syrian Tragedy: One Family’s Horror (Lightbox)

Nicole Tung: The Battle for Aleppo (Global Post)

Laurent van der Stockt: The Battle for Aleppo (Reportage)

Ayman Oghanna: Aleppo (Telegraph)

Kate Brooks: The Other Side of Syria’s Civil War (Foreign Policy)

Espen Rasmussen: Syria’s Suffering (Panos)

Giulio Piscitelli: Heavy Fighting Near Homs, Syria (NYT)

Ricardo Garcia Vilanova: In a Rebellious Part of Syria, a Makeshift Hospital (NYT)

Yuri Kozyrev: The Syrian Arms Race (Lightbox)

Elsewhere in the Middle East.

Oded Balilty: The Ultra-Holy City: Photographs by Oded Balilty (Lightbox)

Olivia Arthur: The Secret World of Saudi Women (Newsweek)

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (VII Mentor)

Adam Ferguson: Egypt’s Runoff Election (VII)

 Donald Weber: War is Good* (Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund)

Brigitte Lacombe: Hey’Ya (Nowness)

Afghanistan.

Photo © Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Lucas Jackson: Afghanistan (Reuters)

Andrea Bruce: For a Female Boxer from Afghanistan, An Olympic Journey Ends (Lightbox)

Gloriann Liu: Victims of War in Afghanistan (NYT Lens)

Sean Power: 40 Commando (Auto de Fe)

South Sudan.

Photo © Cedric Gerbehaye

New Yorker (photos by Cedric Gerbehaye and Dominic Nahr): South Sudan (New Yorker) audio slideshow

Fabio Bucciarelli: South Sudan One Year On (Guardian)

Shannon Jensen: South Sudan Refugees (Guardian)

Christian Als: South Sudan’s Birth Pains (Panos)

Somalia.

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Dominic Nahr: Somalia in Transition (Lightbox)

Dominic Nahr: Mothers risk lives during childbirth in Somalia (CNN)

Goran Tomasevic: Life in Mogadishu as Somalia’s capital slowly recovers from war (Guardian)

Susan Schulman: Mogadishu’s Transition to Peace (Reportage)

Phil Moore: Fragile peace bolsters Somali Olympic hopes (Al Jazeera)

Elsewhere in the continent of Africa.

Photo © Yann Gross

Yann Gross: Uganda’s Skateboarding Scene (NYT Magazine)

Benjamin Lowy: Scenes from the Libyan Election (Slate)

Ivor Prickett: Deadly Motherhood (Panos) Sierra Leone

Marco Gualazzini: Militias Zealous to Oust Islamists in Mali (NYT)

Lynsey Addario: Malians Flee as Extremists Tighten Their Grip (NYT)

Lynsey Addario: Zimbabwe’s Black Farmers Faring Better After Land Upheavals (NYT)

Lynsey Addario: In Zimbabwe’s Bounty, a Political Chip (NYT)

Phil Moore: Kenya’s Maasai Women (Al Jazeera)

Photo © Phil Moore

Phil Moore: Congo (Denver Post)

Phil Moore: Goma (NCB News) Defending Goma (Al Jazeera)

Michael Christopher Brown: DRC with iPhone (Lightbox)

Nicki Sobecki: Using Small Loans to Generate Big Profits (WSJ)

North America.

Photo © Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario: Hope in the Wreckage (NYT Magazine) Mississippi health care

Photo © Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks: Civil Rights Images (NYT Lens)

Walker Evans: American Photographs (Lightbox)

John Moore: Healing wounded warriors at Brooke Army Medical Center (NBC News)

Todd Heisler: Brooklyn Basketball (NYT)

Don Usner: Chimayo, New Mexico (New Yorker)

Lucy Nicholson: Inside San Quentin Prison (Reuters)

Photo © Martin Schoeller

Martin Schoeller: Portraits of the 2012 U.S. Olympians (Lightbox)

Jim Naughten: The Way We Were: 1948 London Olympians Look Back (Lightbox)

Damon Winter: Their Golden Years (NYT) Some of the athletes who represented the United States at the 1948 London Games.

Carolyn Drake: Camp Karolyi: An Enduring Legacy for U.S. Olympic Gymnasts (Lightbox)

Photo © Erin Trieb

Erin Trieb: The Homecoming Project (Lightbox)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: The Boy From Troy (Lightbox)

Zoe Strauss: Postville, Iowa (NYT Magazine)

Carsten Peter: Chasing Lightning (NGM)

Bieke Depoorter: I Am About to Call It a Day (burn)

Lucas Oleniuk: Detroit Is On Fire (zReportage)

Photo © Antonio Bolfo

Antonio Bolfo: The Birthplace of Obama the Politician (NYT Magazine)

Zachary Canepari: T-Rex: The youngest female Olympic boxer (CNN)

Pete Muller: Machine Gun Americana (Photographer’s website)

Wayne Lawrence: Orchard Beach, Bronx (NYT)

Edward Keating: To Have and to Hold: Gay Marriages in New York City Begin (Lightbox)

Ben Lowy: Meet the Tweeters (Fast Company)

Dan Winters: Last Launch (Lightbox) U.S. Space Program

Katie Orlinsky: The Last-Minute Photographer by City Hall (NYT)

Dona Schwarz: Pre- and Post-Child Parents (NYT Lens)

Aaron Vincent Elkaim: Fort McKay (NYT Lens)

Ben Stechschulte: Dude, Where’s My Windshield? (NYT Magazine)

Gail Albert Halaban: Many Windows on Private Lives (NYT Lens)

Europe.

Photo © Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky

Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky: Home of the Roma Kings (NGM) In a Romanian farm town, once itinerant traders have struck it rich, replacing caravans with mansions.

Stephanie Sinclair: Roma – Failing Another Generation (VII)

Zalmai: Walking in Quicksand (Magnum Foundation) Afghans in Greece

Daniel Etter: Greece’s Porous Border, a Back Door to Europe (NYT)

Maciek Nabrdalik: Slavutich (VII)

Amanda Rivkin: Prague Stag Nights (VII Mentor)

Jost Franko: Shepherds (VII Mentor)

Maja Daniels: Into Oblivion (Lightbox)

Chiara Tocci: Life after Zog and Other Stories (Firecracker)

Marcus Bleasdale: The Survivors of Utøya (Photographer’s Vimeo)

Eivind H Natvig: You Are Here (Foto8)

Titus Simoens: Blue, See (Foto8)

Scott Mitchell: Bradley Wiggins: the Sky’s the limit (Guardian)

Camille Seaman: The Last Iceberg (NYT Lens)

Caucasus.

Photo © Petrut Calinescu

Petrut Calinescu: Black Sea Region (NYT Lens)

Yuri Kozyrev: The Wrestlers of Chechnya (Lightbox)

Yuri Kozyrev: Paradise Lost: 20 Years of Independence in Abkhazia (Lightbox)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: The National Womb: Baby Boom in Nagorno Karabakh (burn)

Central, East, and Southeast Asia.

Photo © Michael Yamashita

Michael Yamashita: Tibet’s Golden “Worm” (NGM) ‘A medicinal fungus highly prized in China is fueling a boom on the Tibetan Plateau.’

James Nachtwey: The Gold Standard:  China’s Female Weight Lifters (Lightbox)

Davide Monteleone: Change in the Gobi: Mongolia’s Economic Boom (Lightbox)

Gilles Sabrie:  Boom Times in Mongolia (NYT)

Lisa Wiltse: Charcoal Kids (Auto De Fe)

Bjorn Bergman: Welcome to North Korea! (zReportage)

Brian Cassey: Life in a Coffin : Hong Kong (Fotostrada)

Photo © Ian Teh

Ian Teh: The Burmese Spring (New Yorker)

Thierry Falise: Burma (Le Monde)

Damir Sagolj: Images of hope in Myanmar (Reuters)

Indian Subcontinent.

Stanley Greene: The Maoist Rebel Insurrection in India (Noor)

Laura El-Tantawy: I’ll Die for You: Suicide in Rural India (VII Mentor)

Yannik Willing: Before Tomorrow: Tourism in Post-War Sri Lanka (New Yorker)

Gazi Nafis Ahmed: Inner Face (VII Mentor)

Central and Latin America.

Photo © Mads Nissen

Mads Nissen: At the Mercy of the Militias (Panos) Colombia

Photo © Tomas Munita

Tomas Munita: A Young Olympian: Diver Carolina Mendoza’s Path to London (Lightbox)

Alejandro Chaskielberg: Remnants of Dutch sugar factories (CNN)

Theo Stroomer: The Resource Curse of Mining in Bolivia (CNN)

Alexandre Meneghini: Lucha Libre (Guardian)

Brigitte Grigner: Ayste, Patagonia (New Yorker)

U.K.

Catherine Teya, originally from Central African Republic.
Photo © Anastasia Taylor-Lind

The Photographers’ Gallery: The World in London | “The World in London presents portraits of Londoners by British and international photographers taken from 2009 – 2012. Each portrait shows a person or people from one of the 204 nations taking part in the London 2012 Games, accompanied by individual stories.” | on Guardian website.

Simon Roberts was documenting the London 2012 Olympics for the Financial Times Magazine…

Photo © Simon Roberts

Simon Roberts: Olympics part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 (FT Magazine)

Zed Nelson Hackney project on the Lens blog… Worth another look as includes larger edit with photos I for one hadn’t seen elsewhere.

Zed Nelson: In the Olympics’ Shadow, a Tale of Two Cities (NYT Lens)

George Georgiou: The Big Smoke by Bus (Lightbox) George Georgiou photographs London

Dan Chung: London 2012 with a smartphone (Guardian)

Tom Jenkins: London 2012: Olympic Highlights (Guardian)

Mark Makela: London Calling (zReportage)

Seamus Murphy: “Went the Games Well?” (New Yorker) Olympics

Photo © Sophie Gerrard

Sophie Gerrard: The Dunes (Independent)

Gareth Phillips: Cross Channel Swimmers (Reportage)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Olympic London: Follow the Crowd (New Yorker)

Manuel Vazquez: BBC’s Bush House (BBC)

Adam Patterson: Twisted Nostalgia: Life After The Troubles (Lightbox)

Keith Wilson: Highs and lows: Behind the scenes with the Red Arrows (BBC)

Kieran Dodds: The Clan (Panos)

Photo © Chris Hoare

Chris Hoare: Dreamers (Issuu)  Bristol’s hip-hop scene

Gesche Würfel: Go For Gold! (Foto8) The transformation of London’s landscape in preparation for the London 2012 Olympic Games.

To finish off… Olympic photographer vs. lens cap

Interviews and Talks | 3 July 2012

This is really fascinating… David Burnett writing about the moment he missed taking a picture of the ‘napalm girl’ due to having to change film….

Photo © David Burnett

David Burnett : ‘Forty years after ‘napalm girl’ picture, a photographer reflects on the moment that might have been his’ (Washington Post)

Photo © Alex Webb

Alex Webb (NYT Magazine 6th floor blog)

Bruce Davidson (TateShots on YouTube)

Steve McCurry (Al Jazeera interview video posted on Phaidon)

Steve McCurry  (Phaidon)

Ed Kashi (Vimeo)

Paid my first visit to the recently re-opened Photographers’ Gallery in London’s Soho on Saturday to see the Burtynsky exhibition. Amazing to see those 8×10 large format photos printed big….

Photo © Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky (The Atlantic)

Ron Haviv : The Complete Travel Took Kit (VII Magazine)

Inside Media: Photographers of the Year with Damon Winter, Adrees Latif, and Barbara Davidson (2011) (Newseum’s YouTube) 40 mins.

Randy Olson : Easter Island Kite Camera (photothisandthat.co.uk) 5 mins

Elizabeth Krist : National Geographic’s Senior Photo Editor  : ‘What Photo Buyers Want’ (Photoshelter Vimeo) 65 mins

Alexandra Avakian (NGM)

Paula James : Panos Pictures (IdeasTap)

Magnum photographers on their craft  (IdeasTap)

Tomas van Houtryve : 2012 Oslo Freedom Forum (YouTube) 10 mins

Brigitte Lacombe (Charlie Rose)

Afghan photographers shoot to glory (Al Jazeera)

For a person who often says ‘I don’t care about the equipment’, I sure am eager to read about others’ gear…

Marcus Yam : In My Bag (Photo Brigade)

Luke Sharrett : In My Bag (Photo Brigade)

Nadav Kander (YouTube)

Nadav Kander : How to Create an Unforgettable Portrait (Fastcocreate.com)

Matt Lutton (Wired Raw File blog)

Abbey Trayler-Smith (WalesOnline)

Kira Pollack (Vimeo)

Chris Buck (A Photo Editor)

Photo © John Vink

John Vink (Verve Photo)

Lynsey Stone : Birth Photographer (NYT)

Daniel Reimold: 10 Tips for Photojournalism Students: How to Succeed Visually and Financially (Photo Brigade)

“She looks like a person who will die one day.”

– Thomas Struth on his commission to photograph The Queen.

Photo © Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth : Queen’s Diamond Jubilee: interview with a royal portrait artist (Telegraph)

Annie Leibovitz : The Monarchy (YouTube) Edited version from the BBC Documentary on the Queen, Leibovitz’s struggle to capture the Monarchy.

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via Panam Part 9 (Nikon blog)

Photo © Adam Pretty

Adam Pretty (Time Out Australia)

David Stuart : Still Images In Great Advertising (A Photo Editor)

Kurt Markus : The Portrait : Find Your Voice (A Photo Editor)

Not a photographer interview but interesting…

Michael Ware (Newsweek)

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • “MediaStorm broke new ground in digital publishing on Tuesday,” writes Jonathan D. Woods for Time‘s Lightbox, “with the launch of a pay-per-story video player, one of the industry’s most exciting attempts to capitalize on the strength of multimedia productions.” The company’s founder Brian Storm explains the decision to start charging viewers $1.99 for their latest premium multimedia content.  Maggie Steber, whose piece “Rite of Passage,” is one of the first offered under this arrangement, responds to early critics of the new publishing model.
  • Kathy Ryan, for The New York Times‘ 6th Floor blog, covers the Alex Webb interview with Geoff Dyer at last weekend’s Look3 Festival, offers some choice quotes and a selection of images that appeared in the photographer’s retrospective monograph The Suffering of Light (Aperture 2011). PhotoShelter Blog offers a more extensive “Look3 Festival Round-Up,” in journal format with images of some of the exhibition spaces.
  • Joerg Colberg publishes a piece on Conscientious called “Photography After Photography (A Provocation)” which addresses the question, “Now that we’ve done all that stuff that you can see in history-of-photography books, now that we’ve become obsessed with re-creating that past over and over again – how can we turn around, to look at and move into the future?” It garnered a bit of attention and a response from Fototazo titled “What Is Progress in Photography Today?
  • PetaPixel posts this video of a talk that Lytro founder Ren Ng gave at TEDxSanJoseCA last month on the future of photography, exploring how his company’s revolutionary camera which allows users to “shoot now, focus later,” will change the art form.  They also shared a nice info-graphic this week, “A Shapshot of the Photography Industry” which illustrates just how rapidly technology has revolutionized the field. In 2000, 99% of photography was analog. Today, that number is more like 1%.
  • LIFE publishes “Father’s Day Special: Life with Famous Dads,” featuring a slideshow of images from their archive, NYTimes’ LENS Blog takes a look at work by Zun Lee, “Exploring African American Fatherhood,” and NPR’s The Picture Show profiles the highly compelling photographs by Timothy Archibald–”Frustrated By Autism, A Father Turns To Photos“–which explore not his son’s diagnosis, but their ensuing relationship.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • “Imagine a place where a thousand of your best photo friends and heroes have taken over an artsy southern town,” says Andrew Owen, managing director of this weekend’s Look3 Festival in Charlottesville, VA, “and over three days you take in a dozen gallery exhibits, eat at outdoor cafes between talks by legendary photographers, see new work from photographers working all over the world, and return home exhausted and inspired.” That’s where we’ll be for the next few days, in part presenting a special exhibition, the Aperture at Sixty Library, which will showcase highlights from Aperture’s many years of publishing. La Lettre de La Photographie profiles exhibitions at the festival by Hank Willis Thomas, Alex Webb, Bruce Gilden, Stanley Greene, and many more. NYTimes‘ LENS blog takes a closer look at Thomas’ work, LA Times‘ Framework interviews Mitch Dobrowner, whose work is also featured at Look3, and Time‘s LightBox speaks with guest curators Vincent Musi and David Griffin.
  • More in festival coverage, Flak Photo offers four free days of live streaming lectures and panel discussions from the Flash Forward Festival, emerging photographers from Canada, the US and the UK, in Boston, MA at Fairmont Battery Wharf, June 7 – 10, 2012, presented in part by the Magenta Foundation. Download the festival catalogue here, and check out the full calendar of events.
  • Meanwhile in Europe, PhotoEspana has gotten underway. Of particular interest: Image Anxiety, curated by Chinese independent curator Huang Du, and of course, the annual Photobooks of the Year exhibition. In other international festival and fair news, the word is out that Paris Photo will launch a Los Angeles edition in April, 2013 at the Paramount Studios, as reported by the LA Times and the British Journal of Photography.
  • NPR’s Claire O’Neill heads on a trip to the New York Times’ “Lively Morgue,” their basement newspaper archive which contains five-to-six million photographic prints and contact sheets, overseen by Jeff Roth, mined and disseminated on the Times’ brilliant Tumblr site by photo editor Darcy Eveleigh and others.
  • “Sometimes it takes me two hours to get down a street, because there are so many things to photograph and people to meet,” writes Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol in his latest entry from Beijing for Leica Camera Blog’s fascinating Arrivals and Departures series, unfolding live. Follow Sobol’s journey along the Trans Siberian Railway, “from the Russian forests to the Mongolian desert and finally through the mountains to Beijing,” shooting black-and-white every step–quite literally–along the way with the Leica’s new digital monochrome-only camera. Episode five, offers up a stunning gallery of images–dynamic, saturated street photos that remind us of work by Eikoh Hosoe from Barakei.
  • Another historical archive of photographs has emerged in New York at the New York Public Library. A “visual encyclopedia” of 41,000 prints by Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange and others have recently been found, many digitized and now made available to the public on a special NYPL site. Originally compiled and organized  in the 30s and 40s by Roy Stryker, founder of the Farm Securities Administration’s photography project, many of the prints were in a public lending library until the 50s. ”Incredibly,” writes James Estrin for NY Times’ LENS blog, “anyone with a library card could check out an original print of a Dorothea Lange image and put it on their wall for a while. It’s easy to imagine that some were never returned.”
  • Find images of the once-in-a-lifetime Venus in Transit event which happens every 105 years or so, from LA TimesFramework, Boston‘s Big Picture, WSJ‘s Photo Journal, Conscientious, and The Atlantic‘s In Focus. Marvin Heiferman, author of the new book Photography Changes Everything (Aperture 2012), shared this great link on his twitter feed, “a history of photographers who’ve already tracked the Transit of Venus.”

Aperture, Chris Boot @ LOOK3 Festival

According to Time Magazine’s LightBox, “The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear [for the 2012 iteration.]” This weekend, the visions of Musi and Griffin come to fruition as Charlottesville, Virginia plays host to LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph 2012.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph returns June 7 through 9. Pinned as a “celebration of photography, created by photographers, for those who share a passion for the still image,” LOOK3 is sponsored by BD, National Geographic magazine, and Canon USA, and hosted this year along Charlottesville, VA’s Downtown Mall. The Festival features exhibits and on-stage appearances of three “INsight” photographers, as well as exhibitions, outdoor projections, workshops and interviews over three days and nights.

INsight artists Alex Webb, Donna Ferrato, and Stanley Greene will be featured in 2012, three artists who have met the standards of having produced a significant body of work, and who are understood to possess the capacity to inspire others in the field. The weekend’s masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman, as well as Aperture Foundation’s Executive Director Chris Boot, whose more than 25 years in photography has yielded countless books commissioned, edited or published since 1984.

Aperture will be further present, assembling a special exhibition, Aperture at Sixty Library, which will showcase highlights from Aperture’s many years of publishing—first through the eponymous magazine then, starting in the 1960s, through books—that will reflect on one of the most comprehensive and influential libraries in the history of photography.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph
June 7 through 9, 2012
Downtown mall and other venues
Charlottesville, Virginia

Chris Boot MASTERS TALK
June 8, 2012, 11am
The Paramount Theater

Aperture at Sixty Library
June 7 through 17, 2012
200 Water St

———

›› La Lettre de La Photographie profiles exhibitions at the festival by Hank Willis Thomas, Alex WebbBruce GildenStanley Greene, and many more. NYTimes‘ LENS blog takes a closer look at Thomas’ workLA Times‘ Framework interviews Mitch Dobrowner, whose work is also featured at Look3, and Time‘s LightBox speaks with guest curators Vincent Musi and David Griffin.

Curators Look Ahead to LOOK3

The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear this coming weekend. The annual for-photographers-by-photographers event in Charlottesville, Va. runs June 7-9. But, says Musi, the weekend will include the work of more than one year: professional relationships and the curators’ senses of balance, both developed over many years, were key in the decision process.

The three artists chosen by Musi and Griffin to be this year’s INSight Artists—the featured photographers who, Griffin says, must be people who have made a significant body of work and can inspire other photographers—are Stanley Greene, Donna Ferrato and Alex Webb. Masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman; David Doubilet is this year’s TREES Artist, whose work will be hung in trees along Charlottesville’s downtown pedestrian mall.

Although the festival does not have an explicit theme, Musi says that a documentary slant is strong in all of the featured work. “We also have this crossover because advertising and the fine-art world are really stepping up and doing a lot of what journalism used to do,” he says. And it goes both ways: he cites Hank Willis Thomas as someone who is using journalistic forms outside of the world of journalism. “The common thread,” Musi says. “is that everyone is very excited to have a foot in each world, but the work is very documentary in nature.”

Griffin echoes that sentiment, citing the aesthetic vision evident in Alex Webb’s work as an example of great journalism that “hits that beautiful spot” that touches the art world. He says that this year’s LOOK3 will place a heavier emphasis on individual shows for the speakers’ work, so that guests who attend the talks will be able to see the pictures discussed. There will be more than a dozen hours of onstage programming and a dozen print shows hung, which is more than in previous years.

Both curators agree, though, that the artists who present are not necessarily the highlights of the festival. “This is building a community and sustaining it, so that people go from one side of the stage to the other and back again,” says Musi. That community is made up of artists who attend as viewers, give talks a later year and then maybe teach a workshop some other time.

And artists who just hang out: “There’s a coffee house and it’s right outside of one of the hotels, and I just remember walking out each morning and David Alan Harvey would always be sitting out there having a cup of coffee,” Griffin says of past festivals, “and there’d be Martin Parr sitting with him or Jim Nachtwey, and you’d just walk up and sit down and start talking with a person. That’s one of the really cool things about the festival.”

More information about this year’s LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph, which will take place in Charlottesville, Va., from June 7-9, is available here.

Shane Lavalette

The name Shane Lavalette first entered my consciousness when he created the innovative and stellar magazine, Lay Flat.  While still a student, Shane excited the photo world with his new approach to publishing. His mastery of all things visual continues to be evident with his new body of work, Picturing the South.  Born in Vermont, Shane received his BFA from Tufts University in partnership with the School of the Museum of Art, Boston. He has exhibited and published widely, and is the Associate Director of Light Work.

Shane was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta to create new photographs about the South, along with Martin Parr and Kael Alford, for an exhibition that opens at the museum on June 9th and runs through September 2, 2012. The exhibition features a companion exhibition, Picturing New York, with 150 historical works by Lewis Hine, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, Harry Callahan, and Diane Arbus.
In order to generate funds to publish a book of this work, Shane has created a Kickstarter campaign with some wonderful bonus items including prints, books, and music.


In 2010 I was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta to create a new body of photographs for their “Picturing the South” series, which includes past artists Sally Mann, Emmet Gowin, Richard Misrach, Dawoud Bey, Alex Webb and Alec Soth. I’m honored to be amongst these artists, and look forward to exhibiting new work with photographers Martin Parr and Kael Alford in June of 2012.
Images from Picturing the South
Having grown up in the Northeast, it was primarily through traditional music—old time, blues, gospel, etc.—that I had formed a relationship with the South. With that in mind, the region’s rich musical history became the natural entry point for my work. I was not interested in making a documentary about Southern music today, but desired to explore the relationship between traditional music and the contemporary landscape through a more poetic lens. Moved by the themes and stories past down in songs, I let the music itself carry the pictures. 
Two years later, with the project now complete, I have begun working on a mock-up of a book which I believe is the ideal venue for this body of work. From the beginning I imagined this project in book form. With your help, I hope to make this book physical in the coming months.

If you are interested in helping bring Shane’s book to fruition, check out his Kickstarter campaign!