Tag Archives: Aleppo

Syria’s Agony: The Photographs That Moved Them Most

Syria has always been a tough place to cover for journalists. Confidently authoritarian with a ruthlessly formidable security and intelligence apparatus, Syria has long been one of the most policed of Arab police states. So when some Syrians defied their government to take to the streets in the southern city of Dara‘a in March 2011, the temptation to cover the story was overwhelming for many, including myself.

The story of the Syrian uprising is ultimately the tale of regular citizens silencing the policeman in their heads, breaking their own personal barriers of fear to speak, to demonstrate, to demand, to reject, to no longer be afraid, to live in dignity. It’s about what these people will do, what they will endure, and what they are prepared to become to achieve their aims.

It is also the story of a significant portion of the population that considers the regime of President Bashar Assad the country’s best option, because they believe in its Baathist secular ideology or directly benefit from its patronage or don’t have confidence in Assad’s opponents and fear what may come next. Understanding what this segment of the population will accept in terms of state violence, the narratives they choose to believe and their concerns is a critical component of the story, though one that is harder to obtain, given the paucity of press visas issued by Damascus.

The only way to tell the Syrian story, really tell it, is to be on the ground with the men, women and children who are central to it, whether in Syria on in the neighboring states that many Syrians have fled to. It isn’t easy to do — the Committee to Protect Journalists, based in New York City, has dubbed Syria the “most dangerous place for journalists in the world” — but it is essential. Nothing beats being there. There is no compensating for seeing, feeling, touching, capturing, living the story.

The images here are a testament to the power of being on the ground, of sharing and capturing a moment for posterity, of translating an element of a person’s life through imagery.

Take a look at the photos. Can you place yourself in these situations? Can you imagine what it must be like? What do you feel when you look at the images? Are you drawn into them, or are you repulsed? Can you relate to them, or are they too alien? This is the power of translating on-the-ground reporting to an audience. This is why we must and will continue to document the Syrian uprising from inside the country when we can, and we — members of the foreign press corps — are not alone. Sadly, as is often the case, local journalists (both professional and citizen) have disproportionately borne the brunt of the casualties in this crisis. Still, this story is not about members of the media and what we go through to tell it; it’s about the Syrians who entrust their testimonies, their experiences, their hopes, their fears, their images to us in the hope that they will help explain what is happening in one of the most pivotal states in the Middle East.

—Rania Abouzeid


This collection of testimonies is the third in a series by TIME documenting iconic images of conflict. See “9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most” and “Afghanistan: The Photographs That Moved Them Most” for more.

Abouzeid is a Middle East correspondent for TIME. Reporting by Vaughn Wallace.



Pictures of the Week: November 23 – 30

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From protests in Egypt and life in the aftermath of the Gaza conflict to Myanmar’s refugee camps and volcanic lava spilling into the ocean in Hawaii, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

Tearsheet of The Day | Narciso Contreras from Aleppo in Time

Most of the world’s media attention has been on Gaza for the week or so, but the fighting in Syria hasn’t been any quieter. Just yesterday we saw news reports of airstrikes by Syrian government damaging a hospital in Aleppo which killed 15 people and left as many as 40 missing.

Time magazine (Int’l ed.) ran an article about the Syria’s largest city in their last weekend’s issue. Opens with a striking photo by Narciso Contreras who has been filing photos from Aleppo for the Associated Press and Polaris.

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Photo Narciso Contreras
Text on the spread: Cat and Mouse. Both regime and rebels have snipers at the ready. Rebel fighters are reflected in a mirror as they watch for enemies

Narciso Contrerasis a photojournalist born in Mexico City, whose work focuses on ‘feature stories, reportage and documentary based on religious communities, human nature and conflicts.’

Pictures of the Week: October 5 —12

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From the Taliban shooting of a 14-year-old activist in Pakistan to the vice-presidential debate in Kentucky to angry protests against the German Chancellor’s visit in Greece and a human tower in Spain, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Pictures of the Week: September 21 – 28

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From the NFL touchdown controversy in the U.S. News submission . and Israelis observing Yom Kippur to China’s first aircraft carrier and surfing with dolphins in Australia, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Features and Essays | September 2012

Middle East.

Great work in Time by Moises Saman from recent clashes at his homebase Cairo… Opening spread featured as a Tearsheet of the Day earlier this week…

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman: Clashes in Cairo (Lightbox) Different edit (Magnum)

Shawn Baldwin and Ayman Oghanna: Syrian Refugees in Turkey (New Yorker)

Bryan Denton: With the Rebels in the Battle for Aleppo (NYT) | Syria (Paris Match)

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman: Battle for Aleppo (Magnum)

Ricardo Garcia Vilanova: Aleppo (CNN Photo blog) Battle in Aleppo (CNN)

Adam Dean: Syria (Newsweek) | Inside the Syrian Conflict (Panos)

Impressive work from Aleppo by AP’s Manu Brabo.

Photo © Manu Brabo / AP

Manu Brabo: Aleppo (National)

Nicole Tung: Suffering and Resilience: The Hospitals of Aleppo (Lightbox)

Giulio Piscitelli: Risking Their Lives to Save Lives : Syria (Private magazine)

Sam Tarling: Syria (Executive Magazine)

Yuri Kozyrev from Yemen in Time….

Photo © Yuri Kozyrev

Yuri Kozyrev: The End of al-Qaeda? On Patrol in Yemen (Lightbox) different edit (NOOR)

Ed Ou recently in Gaza for the New York Times…

Ed Ou: Gaza (NYT)

Ed Ou: Ways that Life Goes On : Iraq (Getty Reportage Tumblr)

Julien Goldstein’s Perpignan exhibited multi-year Kurdistan project on Reportage website.

Photo © Julien Goldstein

Julien Goldstein: Kurdistan: The Anger Of A People Without Rights (Reportage)

Fernando Moleres: Sounds of Light and Hope (Panos) Egypt

Yaakov Israel: Land of Stories and Myths (Lightbox) Israel

Natalie Naccache: No Madam (Reportage Emerging Talent) Lebanon

Indian subcontinent.

Photo © Roberto Schmidt

Roberto Schmidt: Geddani ship-breakers : Pakistan (The National) | Different edit (Paris Match)

Tim Mitchell: Clothing Recycled : India (Foto8)

Justin Mott: Labor Unrest in Bangladesh’s Garment Industry (NYT)

Stuart Freedman: Ageing in India (Panos)

Luigi Baldelli: Prostitution in Bangladesh (Parallelozero)

Europe.

Strong set  by World Press Photo winner Samuel Aranda on the tough economic reality faced by many in Spain…from NYT..

Photo © Samuel Aranda

Samuel Aranda: In Spain, Austerity and Hunger (NYT)

Markel Redondo: The Pain in Spain (Foto8)

Photo © Gianni Cipriano

Gianni Cipriano: In Malta, Immigrants Left in Limbo (NYT)

Stefano De Luigi:  iDyssey (New Yorker)

Platon: Greece (New Yorker)

Walter Astrada: Violence Against Women in Norway (NYT Lens)

Africa.

Brent Stirton in October issue of National Geographic magazine.

Photo © Brent Stirton

Brent Stirton: Blood Ivory (NGM) ‘Thousands of elephants die each year so that their tusks can be carved into religious objects. Can the slaughter be stopped?’

Tyler Hicks on the same topic in NYT.

Tyler Hicks: In Poaching Frenzy, Africa’s Elephants Vanishing (NYT) DRC

Shannon Jensen’s South Sudan series from Newsweek.. Featured in a Tearsheet of they Day last month..

Photographs © Shannon Jensen

Shannon Jensen: A Long Walk (Newsweek) South Sudan | You can also see some of Jensen’s work in this MSF video on Youtube.

John Stanmeyer: Health Crisis in South Sudan, Part I | Health Crisis in South Sudan, Part II (VII) |   Sudanese Refugees in Yida (MSF)

Pete Muller: Humanitarian Crisis in Sudan’s Border  (ushmm.org)

Heartbreaking series of photographs by Nicki Sobecki.

Photo © Nichole Sobecki

Nichole Sobecki: A Tiny Life Ends in South Sudan (NYT Lens)

Mads Nissen: After the War: Libyan Cityscapes (Panos)

Graeme Williams: Painting over the Present : South Africa (Panos)

Dominic Nahr: A Visionary Journey (Lightbox) Kenya

Benedicte Kurzen’s Nigeria project which was exhibited at Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Benedicte Kurzen

Benedicte Kurzen: Tangled Roots of Violence in Northern Nigeria (NYT Lens)

Jerome Delay: Niger’s Nomadic Herdsmen (Guardian) different edit (NBC News)

Jan Grarup: Somalia (Politiken)

Sven Dumelie: Gold Mining in Southern Ethiopia (Guardian)

Latin America.

David Alan Harvey from Rio in October issue of NGM…

Photo © David Alan Harvey

David Alan Harvey: Rio de Janeiro (NGM) ‘Rio is a city of glamour and glitz—but also of poverty and violence in the favelas that climb its hills. With the Olympics coming in 2016, the slums are getting a face-lift.’

Sebastian Liste: The Abandoned Chocolate Factory (Lightbox) Brazil

Pilar Olivares: Ballet Santa Teresa in Rio de Janeiro (Guardian)

New group project by NOOR: Brazil

Photo © Francesco Zizola

Francesco Zizola: Brazil’s Middle Class (NOOR)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Pacifying the Favelas (NOOR)

Andrea Bruce: The Power of Women (NOOR)

Pep Bonet: Brazil’s Transsexuals (NOOR)

Jon Lowenstein: Sao Paolo Rising (NOOR)

Photo © Andrew Moore

Andrew Moore: Reinventing Cuba (NYT Magazine)

Kevin Kunishi: Remembering Nicaragua (New Yorker) | video (Youtube)

Photo © Tomas Munita

Tomas Munita: A Salvadoran Cease-Fire Holds, for Now (NYT)

James Whitlow Delano: A history interwoven with sugar : Suriname (CNN)

Ed Kashi: Making sugar and sweets : Brazil (CNN)

Stephen Ferry: Colombia (New Yorker)

Juan Orrantia: Life After Coca : Colombia (Foto8)

Roberto Guerra: The Curse of Inca Gold (zReportage)

Tarrah Krajnak: Strays (Foto8) Peru

US.

I’m yet to see Lauren Greenfield’s documentary The Queen of Versailles… here is the feature in stills on Institute website….

Photo © Lauren Greenfield

Lauren Greenfield: The Queen of Versailles (Institute)

Lauren Greenfield: The Best Club Ever (Institute) video (GQ)

Vittoria Mentasti: For God and for Gold: Photographs from Atlantic City (New Yorker)

Enjoyed Doug Menuez’s Silicon Valley project exhibition at Visa pour l’image… here are the photos on the Lens blog…

Doug Menuez: Steve Job and The Tech Boom (NYT Lens)

Carolyn Drake: The Lubavitchers (Panos)

Shannon Taggart: Basement Vodou: Haitian Spirituality in Brooklyn (Lightbox)

Richard Misrach: Petrochemical America (New Yorker)

Yunghi Kim’s Occupy photos in Süddeutsche Zeitung in Germany to coincide with the one year anniversary of OWS…

Photo © Yunghi Kim

Yunghi Kim: Occupy Wall Street (Süddeutsche Zeitung)

Robert Nickelsberg: The Army Mountain Warfare School (Reportage)

Gillian Laub: Camp Lee Mar: 60 Years of Summer Fun for Special Needs Children (Lightbox)

Callie Shell photographing Obama again…

Photo © Callie Shell

Callie Shell: Obama on the Campaign Trail (Lightbox)

Jason Andrew: Inside Obama’s HQ (FT Magazine)

Ben Lowy: the RNC and DRC Convention Instagrams (New Yorker)

Charles Ommanney: US Presidential Campaign 2012 (Reportage)

Charles Ommanney: Obama in Iowa Campaign Trail (Newsweek)

Lauren Fleishman: The Convention Draws Near: The Romney-Ryan Road Trip to Tampa (Lightbox)

Grant Cornett: The DRC Delegates (Lightbox)

Grant Cornett: The RNC Delegates (Lightbox)

Grant Cornett: The RNC Protests (Lightbox)

Lauren Lancaster: RNC (New Yorker)

Charles Ommanney: The Family (Reportage)

Melissa Cacciola: The Mohawk Ironworkers (Lightbox)

Camilo José Vergara: MLK Murals (Lightbox)

Melissa Lyttle: Good Sisters (zReportage)

Touching multimedia by Peter van Agtmael (photos) and Gaia Squarci (video) for the New Yorker

Photo © Peter van Agtmael

Peter van Agtmael (photos) Gaia Squarci (video): Treasure, Thrown Away (New Yorker) “one family’s reckoning with the sudden murder of their loved one.’ Multimedia to accompany a New Yorker article on confidential informants.

Joseph Rodriguez: From Behind Bars (Lightbox)

Zed Nelson: Gun Nation Revisited (Lightbox)

Emily Berl: In Coney Island, Grand Dreams on the Far Edges (NYT Lens)

Gaia Light and Alessandro Cosmelli: Beautiful Brooklyn (Newsweek)

Zachary Canepari’s project on Claressa Shields, young American female boxing phenomenon… He is also working on feature doc I heard….

Photo © Zachary Canepari

Zachary Canepari: T-Rex (Panos)

Wayne Lawrence: Small Ball (Institute) different edit (Lightbox)

Mary Kang: Bhutanese refugees rebuild in Texas (CNN)

UK.

Spencer Murphy shot a terrific portrait project for Save the Children…

Photo © Spencer Murphy

Spencer Murphy: Children’s views of poverty (Guardian) backstage video (Youtube)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Tired of London, Tired of Life (VII)

Afghanistan.

John D McHugh: Kabul – A city of hope and fear (Al Jazeera)

Bryan Denton: In Afghanistan, American Trainers Keep Their Armor On (NYT)

Andrew A. Nelles: K9 Soldiers (zReportage)

Japan.

Kosuke Okahara: Fragments of Fukushima (NYT Lens)

North Korea.

David Guttenfelder and Vincent Yu: Revealing more of North Korea (Boston Globe)

Russia.

Photo © Misha Friedman

Misha Friedman: Corruption in Russia (NYT)

Greenland.

Andrew Testa: Greenland’s Changing Face (NYT)

Stefano De Luigi: Northwest Passage (VII)

Azerbaijan.

Rena Effendi: Liquid Land (Institute)

China.

Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer: China’s One Percent (Foreign Policy)

Huang Qingjun: Chinese families’ worldly goods (BBC)

Adam Dean: China rushes to build a new generation of mega-dams (Telegraph)

Australia.

Jackie Dewe Mathews: Tasmania: Beyond Down Under (Newsweek)

Southeast Asia.

Paula Bronstein: Manila’s hidden spaces: Life on the margins in a crowded megacity (NBC News) Philippines

Laura El-Tantawy: Thailand: Smile Me Hello (VII Mentor)

Jaime Cunningham: Burma Foreign Investors Don’t See (Newsweek)

Tomasz Tomaszewski: Sugar Towns of Yesterday (CNN) Indonesia

Carl de Keyzer: Modern world of sugar consumption (CNN) Indonesia

Projects with various different countries.

Slideshow of late Remi Ochlik’s amazing Arab Apring work on the Lightbox…Revolutions book is now out and can be purchased from Emphas.is.

Photo © Remi Ochlik

Remi Ochlik: Revolutions (Lightbox)

Julian Germain: Classrooms around the world (Guardian)

An edit of Kadir van Lohuizen’s Via Panam project on NBC News website…

Photo © Kadir van Lohuizen

Kadir van Lohuizen: Migration in the Americas : Searching for a better life (NBC News)

Steve Winter: Tigers (NYT Lens)

Martin Roemers: Metropolis (New Yorker)

Pictures of the Week: August 24 – August 31

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From Hurricane Isaac in the Caribbean and colorful Holi celebrations in Germany to the Paralympics in London and a tree full of goats in Morocco, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Suffering and Resilience: The Hospitals of Aleppo

It was a typical day at one of the hospitals here in Aleppo, a typical three hours, to be even more specific. Children seemed to be everywhere, on hospital beds, in the hospital lobby and waiting with listless faces outside the clinic. Blood seemed to seep through every piece of clothing they had. Some, as young as three, composed themselves as needles pierced their skin to stitch up deep wounds.

Mohamed, 13, tried hard not to cry as he lay on a hospital bed, wincing in pain from the injury he’d sustained after a shell landed near the breadline where he had waited for hours. No one knew he’d been hurt yet and his cousin arrived only thirty minutes later to transfer him to another hospital.

More civilians flooded in, and those who were conscious had a resigned look of acceptance—this was just what happened now these days.

A teenage son, his face smeared in red, collapsed in tears over his father’s body laying on the gurney. He was hit in the head by a bullet, caught in the crossfire as their car made their way through the confusing myriad of streets, unaware of where the snipers or perhaps even the army was. He didn’t seem to register the reality and stared at his father’s bloodied body in disbelief. The doctors bound his father’s hands together and covered him in a blue sheet. They carried his body into the back seat of the car, his feet sticking oddly out of the right window. The boys in the back couldn’t hold it in any longer—as the car pulled away, they wailed.

A man’s body, uncollected by his relatives, lay on a bed in an alley behind the hospital. Another man came rushing in, his eyes wide with fear. In his arms was a bleeding young girl. The hospital staff were all busy attending other civilians and fighters. “What do I do?” he screamed. He was panting, panicking. Someone told him to go to another field hospital. Back in the surgery room, almost easy enough to miss, was an 8-year-old girl who had apparently died in an airstrike. Her body was being wrapped in a shroud and a doctor picked her up to bring her to a waiting taxi.

And minutes later, 15-year-old Fareed was rushed into the hospital. His eyes were wide open as he took deep, labored breaths—his last few before turning motionless. The doctors rushed him to surgery, attempting to resuscitate him. His mother appeared in the lobby, screaming, hyperventilating, crying and grasping at her face in disbelief.

Fareed couldn’t be saved. The little piece of shrapnel had entered his back and passed through his heart—there was nothing the doctors could do here. The hospital had so many needs—for staff, surgeons in particular, and crucial medical equipment like oxygen tanks. It is simultaneously a little house of horrors, and a little house of miracles, where death hangs heavy in the air but every saved life brings a renewed sense of purpose for the doctors.

“I feel a lot of pain inside. A lot of pain, when I see women and children injured. But I have to control myself because I have to help them,” says 28-year-old Abu Ismail, an anesthetist from Aleppo. Abu Ismail wears a black headband with white writing: There is no God but Allah, and Mohamed is his prophet. “This headband gives me strength. I don’t save the lives—Allah does,” he says calmly as the horns of cars rushing to the hospital echo downstairs. Abu Ismail doesn’t flinch—his eyes remain excited and he is always smiling, even though he slept less than two hours the night before.

These are the everyday scenes in one hospital of one neighborhood in Aleppo. A microcosm of what the war looks like for the civilians of Syria, where every day the horror multiplies for even the youngest sufferers in this war. They are often the ones who cry the least as they are treated by doctors, while just a few beds over, grown men, fighters of the Free Syrian Army, scream out in pain. Daily shelling and attacks by helicopters and fighter jets seem to not break the civilian spirit. They remain resilient—they remain because they have no other place to go. Or simply, because they would rather die at home.

Nicole Tung is a freelance photographer who previously documented the uprisings in Libya and Egypt. Tung has previously filed dispatches from Syria recounting the aftermath of an airstrike in Aleppo and civilian funerals in Idlib