Tag Archives: albert hoffman

Philip Heying, 1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley

Philip Heying, 1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley

Philip Heying

1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley,
Lawrence, Kansas, 2012
From the Within a two mile radius for one year series
Website – PhilipHeying.com

Philip Heying is a photographer living in Lawrence, Kansas. In 1980, he met William S. Burroughs and began a friendship that endured until Burroughs’s death in 1997. Burroughs and his circle of friends, from Albert Hoffman and Allen Ginsberg, to Brion Gysin and Timothy Leary provided artistic insight and guidance. Soon after college, curiosity to experience another culture led Heying to France, via coal freighter. Since then his work has been exhibited and published internationally. Heying returned to the U.S. in 1997, settling in Brooklyn, New York, and became an assistant to Irving Penn until the Spring of 2001. In the fall of 2008, he returned from Brooklyn to Kansas to live closer to his family and pursue an idea for a photographic survey that began during a visit in the fall of 2005. He is currently employed as a professor of photography at Johnson County Community College and recently completed a body of photographs of the surprising variety of architecture, cultural and environmental processes to be found within walking distance from his home.
 

Philip Heying, Microburst storm over Burroughs Creek

Philip Heying, Microburst storm over Burroughs Creek

Philip Heying

Microburst storm over Burroughs Creek ,
Lawrence, Kansas, 2009
From the SWEETHEART, IS EVERYTHING O.K.? series
Website – PhilipHeying.com

Philip Heying is a photographer living in Lawrence, Kansas. In 1980, he met William S. Burroughs and began a friendship that endured until Burroughs’s death in 1997. Burroughs and his circle of friends, from Albert Hoffman and Allen Ginsberg, to Brion Gysin and Timothy Leary provided artistic insight and guidance. Soon after college, curiosity to experience another culture led Heying to France, via coal freighter. Since then his work has been exhibited and published internationally. Heying returned to the U.S. in 1997, settling in Brooklyn, New York, and became an assistant to Irving Penn until the Spring of 2001. In the fall of 2008, he returned from Brooklyn to Kansas to live closer to his family and pursue an idea for a photographic survey that began during a visit in the fall of 2005. He is currently employed as a professor of photography at Johnson County Community College and working on a body of photographs of the surprising variety of architecture, cultural and environmental processes to be found within walking distance from his home.
 

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • LightBox presents an essay written by Tim Hetherington, who was featured in Aperture issue 204, from the new book Photographs Not Taken, one year after the photographer’s death in Libya. The collection, compiled by Will Steacy (one of Aperture’s Green Cart Commissioned photographers), also features essays by Roger Ballen, Ed Kashi, Mary Ellen MarkAlec SothPeter van Agtmael and more. Additionally, PDN features an 8 image retrospective by Hetherington, whose work is now on view at Yossi Milo Gallery in New York (through May 12, 2012).
  • This week in commentary: LPV Magazine  digests Instagram articles by Om Malik, the New Yorker’s Ian Crouch and New York Magazine’s Paul Ford, finds out, “Facebook Buys Instagram, Some Photographers Sad.” APhotoEditor reads Paul Melcher‘s poignant article on La Lettre de La Photographie alongside Marc Andreessen‘s WSJ piece “Software Will Eat The World,” and explores “how a company with 13 employees and no profits [Instagram] can replace a now bankrupt company [Kodak] that once employed over 120,000 people with annual sales of $10 billion as the ‘manufacturer’ of a device to bring photography to the masses.” In related news, NPPA opens a mobile phone photo contest, calling for entries through Sunday, April 22, 2012, while Magnum Photos has deployed another team to Rochester to document the once-vibrant home of Kodak as part of their Postcards From America series.
  • Poynter investigates the controversy over the Pentagon delaying the LA Times from publishing photographs of US soldiers posing with the body parts of Afghan corpses, a story which has since elicited over 2000 comments on the Times’ website.
  • Sophie Calle, featured in Aperture issues 191 and 142, talks to the Guardian about her best shot from the series Voir La Mer, in which she “took 15 people of all ages, from kids to one man in his 80s, to see [the sea] for the first time.” She photographed them from behind so as to not obstruct their initial encounter, and she captured the entire process, including their reactions, on video. Her current exhibition, Historias de Pared (at Museo de Arte Moderno Medellín through June 3, 2012) is reviewed on Fototazo.
  • In honor of Albert Hoffman’s infamous Bicycle Day (April 19), LIFE Magazine shares a number of never-before-published dream-like photographs that were to accompany an original 1966 article titled, “New Experience That Bombards the Senses: LSD Art.”
  • American Suburb X shares journal entries from William Gedney on “Kentucky, Sex and Diane Arbus,” alongside scans of the archival material culled from the Duke University Rare Books and Manuscript Library.  Speaking of rare books, ICP Library profiles some of the innovative and experimental photobooks they found and photographed at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair last week.
  • Time Magazine releases their annual list of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World,” alongside a portrait gallery of 24 of the honorees.  Included this year is artist Christian Marclay, of the monumental video installation recently purchased by MoMA, The Clock, and the 2007 Aperture monograph Shuffle, which takes the form of a deck of cards. The Clock will be shown for free this summer from the middle of July to mid-August at Lincoln Center’s David Rubenstein Atrium. Stake out your places now!