Tag Archives: Affection

Things to Submit to!

The next LENSCRATCH exhibition is on your HOME TOWN.  Please send one image of your home town (72dpi, 1000px on the long side, in jpg format) and include:


Name, title, location, link  (Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA, http://www.alinesmithson.com)


Send to: [email protected]

Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA
I have the great pleasure of juroring two upcoming calls…

Announcing Love + Lust

Lust is an intense appetite, craving, or untamed desire. We lust for an array of things—money, power, objects, sex, or just living life. Love is a powerful
affection or personal attachment and comes in a variety of forms, which
can encompass romantic, sexual, platonic, narcissistic, or 
even religious feelings or attitudes. And sometimes love and lust overlap. Show us your interpretations. Who or what do you love or lust for? 
What images capture these emotions for you?


Portraits,
fashion, editorial, landscape, documentary, conceptual, or any other
genre is open for consideration. Color, b&w, iPhone, or 
alternative processes are all eligible.




Book Title: Open to interpretation

Theme: Love + Lust
Judge: Aline Smithson, LENSCRATCH
Submission Fee: $40 for 5 images, $10 additional

Deadline for submission: January 10, 2013
Results Announced: January 23, 2013
Results Posted Online: February 6, 2013
Awards: $1,000 Cover Image + $500 Judge’s Selection Award

2012 FotoWeek DC International Awards Competition

Challenge the Way We Look at the World
FotoWeekDC’s 5th Annual International Awards Competition is looking for extraordinary images – we’re looking for yours! The 2012 competition will honor professional and emerging photographers from our region and from around the world.

  • Cash prizes totaling $20,000
  • Winning images will be exhibited and/or projected during FotoWeekDC, November 9-18 as well as online.
  • Winners will be selected by a distinguished panel of world-renowned judges
  • Winners will be notified on or about October 5, 2012.

Back by popular demand—People’s Choice Award! 
Your entries will be judged by a distinguished panel of industry experts, who will select the top 3 winners in each category. Now, by voting in the People’s Choice category, your friends and fans will have a say too. The top 20 images with the most number of votes across all of the categories will win extra recognition, and will be seen by an even broader audience.
The People’s Choice Award Prizes:
One free FotoPage Annual Subscription for each winning photographer and online exposure through a top 20 feature on FotoDC.org’s People’s Choice Gallery.

Escape from Syria: Photographs by William Daniels

When we arrived in Bab Amr, we began to send e-mails to editors saying we were there. We were excited, happy. Of course, we were scared of the situation, but we were happy.

On the first morning, shelling began very close to us. One boom, then a second. After the third, the Syrians with us shouted, “You have to get out!” Then a fourth rocket hit. We lost Marie Colvin, the American reporter, and my friend Rémi Ochlik, a photographer. The correspondent for Le Figaro, Edith Bouvier, was badly injured, as was Paul Conroy, a British photojournalist.

William Daniels—Panos for TIME

This week’s cover of TIME.

The Syrian army targeted Bab Amr everywhere, anywhere. There was no way to get out. One night we visited families staying underground. There were 150 people in a basement with only small lights. They had some rice and a bit of water. Everyone had a family member who had been killed. We felt very bad, thinking, Please help us get out of here; we have lost our friends. But we couldn’t say that, because they had lost everything.

The Syrians who were looking after us were never outwardly scared. They were totally confident. They would prepare medicine in the middle of the room, while we were cowering behind a wall. They were not scared of anything.

Rémi’s death affected me a lot. And perhaps it will affect me even more later. His career was taking off. He had just won the World Press Photo award. He was becoming famous. I was sure he was about to work with magazines he’d dreamed of working for, like TIME. We were excited about getting to Syria. We thought we had a lot of work. I thought, O.K., we’re here, we’ve come for this, to be inside Bab Amr. There was no time to think that maybe we’d made a mistake in going there.

I really liked Rémi. I had a lot of affection for him. Perhaps because I’m older, I felt a bit like an older brother. But sometimes he was the one advising me, especially when we were in dangerous situations. And he just disappeared, so quickly.

Rémi was cremated in Paris on March 6, the first anniversary of the Syrian revolution.

MORE: A Reporter’s Escape from Syria

French photographer William Daniels was on assignment for TIME in the besieged district of Bab Amr. On March 1, after nine days there, he and Edith Bouvier managed to safely cross the border into Lebanon.

Found: Katherine Wolkoff

American Kestral, 2011, Katherine Wolkoff

Exhibition on view:
March 8April 28, 2012

Sasha Wolf Gallery
548 West 28 St
New York, NY
(212) 925-0025

Cause of death: flew into a lighthouse, death by cat, death by telephone wire. The origin of death to the birds of Block Island is recorded by infatuated gatherer Elizabeth Dickens. She finds, stuffs, and lives with these perished animals. article writing submission . Photographer Katherine Wolkoff befriended Dickens and began photographing her taxidermies. The images are inherently proper and documentary though they reveal a particular affection for the subject matter. The proposed silhouette displays how a birdwatcher identifies the species in the wild. Stark white backgrounds, jet black surfaces, and a hint of back-lighting suggest an intimate relationship between the viewer and the bird offering another existence underneath the lifeless figure.

The exhibition titled, Found will be presented by the Sasha Wolf Gallery.

Wolkoffs series After the Storm, documenting the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, was featured in Aperture issue 184.

Photographer #365: Ana Casas Broda

Ana Casas Broda, 1965, Spain, has been living in Mexico since she was eight years old. Her long-term projects are intense and personal. Her latest body of work is Kinderwunsch, a complex and personal set of images dealing with maternity. She spent five years submitting herself to fertility treatments before she got her first son. When she entered the same process a second time she decided to capture the entire process, the treatments, the pregnancy, birth, bodily contact, affection, feeding and other aspects of the experience. As the project progressed, it has become more complex. With her sons she carries out actions that derive from the childrens minds or from her fantasies. In 2000 she released the book Album, a photographic project that is built on the relationship between her grandmother and herself. It includes images from her childhood to photographs of the last years of her grandmother. The book deals with themes as memory, cultural and personal inheritance as a way to explore identity. The following images come from the series Kinderwunsch, Diet Journals and Album.

Website: www.anacasasbroda.com

Photographer #365: Ana Casas Broda

Ana Casas Broda, 1965, Spain, has been living in Mexico since she was eight years old. Her long-term projects are intense and personal. Her latest body of work is Kinderwunsch, a complex and personal set of images dealing with maternity. She spent five years submitting herself to fertility treatments before she got her first son. When she entered the same process a second time she decided to capture the entire process, the treatments, the pregnancy, birth, bodily contact, affection, feeding and other aspects of the experience. As the project progressed, it has become more complex. With her sons she carries out actions that derive from the childrens minds or from her fantasies. In 2000 she released the book Album, a photographic project that is built on the relationship between her grandmother and herself. It includes images from her childhood to photographs of the last years of her grandmother. The book deals with themes as memory, cultural and personal inheritance as a way to explore identity. The following images come from the series Kinderwunsch, Diet Journals and Album.

Website: www.anacasasbroda.com