Tag Archives: Advertising Campaigns

All-new issue of Lens Culture online now — global photography & photobook reviews

As we enter our 9th year of Lens Culture, we’re releasing our largest issue to date. And more will be added in the coming days and weeks.

Discover great photography and new photobooks touching on an incredibly diverse variety of themes, styles and cultures. Included in this issue, so far:

• On the foggy fringes of explosive growth in China
• A photo diary of a manic road trip around Iceland
• Re-enactment of a real serial murder by teenage Americans
• Centuries of imperialism and war in Afghanistan
• Modern day street photography in Paris
• Steaming mountains of garbage recycled in Phnom Penh
• Dying traditions in Transylvania
• Academic research about Francesca Woodman in Rome
• Grappling with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
• Extended family-based organized crime in London
• Overstepping the boundaries of appropriation
• A (photo) graphic novel with no linear narrative
• Celebration of supersaturated color and personal whimsy
• Duane Michals photographs Magritte
• Photographic philosophical musings on personal identity post 9/11
• An overview of contemporary Iranian photography
• A reprint of a classic book about sexual identity in 1950s’ Paris
• History of Kodak Girl advertising campaigns
• Up-close photographs of criminal interrogations in the Ukraine

We hope you enjoy this new issue. Be sure to tell all of your friends, too, okay?

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Photographer #383: Lauren Greenfield

Lauren Greenfield, 1966, USA, is a documentary photographer and film-maker. She is widely known for her work involving youth culture. She released three monographs, all dealing with the subject matter of youth, entitled Fast Forward (1997), Girl Culture (2002) and Thin (2006). Thin is an in-depth documentation about the treatment of eating disorders. She photographed the lives of nineteen patients at the Renfrew Center in Florida. Adjacent to the images she also followed the patients with a film camera. The project shows the complicated and difficult process of treatment, rehabilitation and the experience of struggling with an eating disorder. Girl Culture is about girl’s and their relationship to their bodies, their inner lives, emotional development and the material world with it’s popular culture. Fast Forward shows the ways children in Los Angeles are influenced by the values of Hollywood. It deals with the quest for “fame” and the preoccupation with trends and materialism. Lauren has a vast archive of editorial stories and advertising campaigns, all produced in a recognizable and colorful style that has created her signature in photography. The following images come from the series Thin, Girl Culture and Fast Forward.

Website: www.laurengreenfield.com

Brad Wilson

Brad Wilson knows how to take a portrait. His site is filled with stunning commercial and editorial portraits of a wide array of sitters, each captured with dignity and respect. He brings these same qualities to his fine art work. Brad’s soulful images of animals are quite remarkable and reflect an intimacy rarely seen in animal photographs.

Chimpanzee #4, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Brad began his studies in art at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and continued on to study at various workshops and work with notable photographers until he began his own career in 1996. He now lives in Santa Fe, is published around the world, which includes images on over 400 book covers around the world, and numerous advertising campaigns, annual reports, and music packages. He has numerous European exhibition slated for 2011, in Switzerland, London, and Belgium.

ANIMALS: There is something appealing about a purely instinctual, intuitive existence. Perhaps it is the common human longing for a simpler life, or the desire to be fully present in each moment – largely free of our recent past or imagined future. For me at least, animals embody this special type of immediacy. Not long ago I began to wonder what it would be like to work with them in a studio environment without cages or scenic landscapes or any other distractions. What would they reveal and what could I create? This whole complex project was really born of those few basic curiosities. A few months and many, many phone calls later, I was standing in front of a chimpanzee, then a tiger, and later an elephant. My journey into the unknown had begun.

Chimpanzee #2, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

The first thing I learned was that I was not really in control, nor was I going to be. For the most part, the animals did what they wanted within the confines of the photography set. Waiting and patience quickly became an integral part of the project. So in the middle of what I can only define as a gentle and unpredictable chaos, I tried to find a specific moment – a moment where mood, composition, and stillness combined to create something uncommon, something unexpected. I was looking for a final image that could stand completely on it’s own, regardless of context, and that also transcended the obvious beauty and power of my subjects. This series of photographs is the result of that exploration.

Chimpanzee #1, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Bull #2, Los Angeles, CA, 2011

Cheetah #1, Los Angeles, CA, 2011

Cheetah #3, Los Angeles, CA, 2011

Elephant #1, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Elephant #4, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Giraffe #3, Los Angeles, CA, 2011

Lion #3, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Orangutan #1, Los Angeles, CA, 2011

Orangutan #3, Los Angeles, CA, 2011

Tiger #1, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Zebra #2, Los Angeles, CA, 2010

Zebra #3, Los Angeles, CA, 2010


Photographer #249: Cédric Delsaux

Cédric Delsaux, 1974, France, studied literature and cinema in Paris. He started out as a copywriter in the advertising world before he decided to devote all his time into photography in 2002. He does personal work aswell as advertising campaigns for major brands. His series Here to Stay explores the relationship between humans and nature. The series was published as a monograph in 2008. In his series The Dark Lens he combined two worlds, the world of Star Wars and Earth. The post-apocalyptic scenes blur reality with fiction. 1784 is again a series in which reality and fiction, myths and symbols, the present and the past meet and collide. In 2005 Cédric was awarded the ‘Bourse du Talent’ award in France. The following images come from the series Here to Stay, The Dark Lens (Star Wars) and 1784.


Website: www.cedricdelsaux.com
(Video in French)