Tag Archives: Adult Life

George Holroyd, Untitled

George Holroyd, Untitled

George Holroyd

Untitled,
Milan, Italy, 2012
Website – GeorgeHolroyd.com

George Holroyd was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. When he was a child, George's family relocated often, transporting him to a variety of cities and towns throughout the eastern half of the United States. From an early age, he developed a sense of being a visitor to these new places, rather than a resident. That feeling of transience stayed with him and he has traveled extensively throughout his adult life, including to Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. He now lives in Paris with his wife, Sarah. His current project, And I, presents a diaristic set of images, made in collaboration with the artist's most faithful companion, a progressive neurological disorder known as Essential Tremor.

Carl Corey

We are a country of entrepreneurs, self-starters, and determined individuals that make up the core of our American dream.  Long before the Fortune 500’s, there were mom and pop day-to-day desires to carve out a living, and a life on one’s own terms.  Carl Corey takes a look at those self-starters who have created family businesses in Wisconsin and have managed to stay afloat for 50 years or more.

Carl is a photographer’s photographer. From the array and quality of his work (be sure to explore his other projects), to his amazing printing and his insightful workshops, he casts a long shadow of excellence.  In his words:

I’ve been a photographer for all of my adult life. The kind of photography I do is called fine art documentary photography, which means that even though I carefully consider how I make a picture they are accurate depictions of real people and real places. I strive for honesty. This work has led me to be interviewed on numerous radio and television programs, including The National News Hour on PBS, the San Francisco Chronicle and The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.  My pictures are making it into museums and corporate as well as private collections.  I am profoundly grateful for this recognition; it’s really encouraged me to work harder.

For Love and
Money

~ the Established Family Business

Becoming intrigued with the familial
lineage involved in many of the Tavern League
subjects
I decided to start to investigate the well established family
business in Wisconsin. My criteria were simple: The enterprise
must
be located in Wisconsin and currently owned and operated by the
family for a minimum of fifty years. 

There is much that can be said pertaining to the history of such an enterprise. There is also the contemporary entrepreneurial commitment to the continued success of the business, most especially with the current economic climate and ever expanding competitive global marketplace.


Films by Paul Graham



The debate years ago on whether film was “better” than digital ruffled a lot of feathers. The old guard held tight to their precious rolls fearing for their eventual disappearance. The argument was framed in technical details but the simple fact is, it is photography either way and making a lasting image is no easier with digital as it was with film – you just don’t have to get your hands wet. Ironically, the negative health effects of photo chemistry is probably about the same as digital if you edit and process files with your radiating “laptop” laying across your groin.

As a printmaker for most of my adult life, I maintain a love for film and the process of developing and printing. It is not “magical” for me nor has it ever been watching images form in chemistry under amber safelights. I simply love the way light reflects off of the paper and sensing the chaos of grain that has built the image. Paul Graham’s newest book from Mack books Films is an homage to that basic component of grain which is not so easily mimicked by pixels.

Graham has scanned small portions of his negatives and enlarged them to reveal only the grainy color dyes. These large color fields are as minimalist as he could get away from his usual approach to picture making. Some might be confounded by this book after his celebrated A Shimmer of Possibility but for me, this work fits into a continuum as I see most of his books not only exploring the social landscape but the basic make-up of photography. His books A1 and Troubled Land could been seen as examples of the optics, the precision and depth of field we might expect from large format work. His book Beyond Caring is more reliant on the speed of the shutter to still the goings on in DHSS offices. His book End of an Age embraces the variety of color balance from many light sources as he circles his pirouetting figures. His book American Night amplifies the role of the aperture in his description of what we want to see and what we might be willing to overlook. And now Films brings the microcosm of the physical material to light. As Graham has said of this work, it is a “negative retrospective” of his practice.

Films is beautifully printed in a high-gloss paper stock to mimic the sheen of celluloid. In a few plates I sense he is also employing a bit of Gaussian blur to create cloud-like alternates that one might see if they have not critically focused the enlarger – a potential human “mistake” in the process which digital certainly has put to death. Those small flaws for me translate into a feeling of something crafted by hands from an imperfect medium. Dust and scratches, unevenly aligned enlargers, a tong mark at the edge of paper – maybe those will become new photoshop filters that can be applied at the stroke of a keypad.

Films by Paul Graham



The debate years ago on whether film was “better” than digital ruffled a lot of feathers. The old guard held tight to their precious rolls fearing for their eventual disappearance. The argument was framed in technical details but the simple fact is, it is photography either way and making a lasting image is no easier with digital as it was with film – you just don’t have to get your hands wet. Ironically, the negative health effects of photo chemistry is probably about the same as digital if you edit and process files with your radiating “laptop” laying across your groin.

As a printmaker for most of my adult life, I maintain a love for film and the process of developing and printing. It is not “magical” for me nor has it ever been watching images form in chemistry under amber safelights. I simply love the way light reflects off of the paper and sensing the chaos of grain that has built the image. Paul Graham’s newest book from Mack books Films is an homage to that basic component of grain which is not so easily mimicked by pixels.

Graham has scanned small portions of his negatives and enlarged them to reveal only the grainy color dyes. These large color fields are as minimalist as he could get away from his usual approach to picture making. Some might be confounded by this book after his celebrated A Shimmer of Possibility but for me, this work fits into a continuum as I see most of his books not only exploring the social landscape but the basic make-up of photography. His books A1 and Troubled Land could been seen as examples of the optics, the precision and depth of field we might expect from large format work. His book Beyond Caring is more reliant on the speed of the shutter to still the goings on in DHSS offices. His book End of an Age embraces the variety of color balance from many light sources as he circles his pirouetting figures. His book American Night amplifies the role of the aperture in his description of what we want to see and what we might be willing to overlook. And now Films brings the microcosm of the physical material to light. As Graham has said of this work, it is a “negative retrospective” of his practice.

Films is beautifully printed in a high-gloss paper stock to mimic the sheen of celluloid. In a few plates I sense he is also employing a bit of Gaussian blur to create cloud-like alternates that one might see if they have not critically focused the enlarger – a potential human “mistake” in the process which digital certainly has put to death. Those small flaws for me translate into a feeling of something crafted by hands from an imperfect medium. Dust and scratches, unevenly aligned enlargers, a tong mark at the edge of paper – maybe those will become new photoshop filters that can be applied at the stroke of a keypad.