Tag Archives: Addario

Almost Dawn in Libya: Exclusive Interactive Panorama

Almost Dawn in Libya, a collaborative project for which eight photographers raised money for four simultaneous Libyan exhibitions of photographs from the country’s conflict—as described here on LightBox—reached its fundraising goal of $40,000 and will be completed in the next few weeks. Photographer André Liohn, one of the guiding forces behind the initiative, spoke to LightBox from Misrata, Libya, where he was preparing for the installation in that city.

“That we finally have the pictures in our hands,” says Liohn, “is very exciting.”

Liohn estimates that they are about 80 percent done with printing the photographs for the shows, but the progress is dodged by remnants of the conflict that the exhibitions are intended to address. On the day before Liohn spoke to LightBox, militiamen seized control of the Tripoli airport. Elections are also on the horizon. It’s still unclear whether the other photographers who are part of the Almost Dawn project—Lynsey Addario, Eric Bouvet, Bryan Denton, Christopher Morris, Jehad Nga, Finbarr O’Reilly and Paolo Pellegrin—will have difficulty getting to Libya for the openings.

But, after everything endured by the photojournalists who captured the Libyan conflict on film, these obstacles are not overly daunting. Liohn says he’s ready to get the shows up and running, particularly because the people he meets in Libya are ready too. Despite—or perhaps because of—the trauma of war, they seem, to him, eager to help with the vision of healing through photography.

“We feel that the project is pretty much as much theirs as it’s ours,” says Liohn, citing the people who have donated both living space and expensive printing services. “To me, it’s very courageous that they are taking so much responsibility for making this happen.”

The Almost Dawn in Libya team has also provided LightBox with the panoramic view shown here, as designed by Paolo Pellegrin and curator Annalisa d’Angelo, which replicates the gallery set-up that will be seen in Libya. The lack of captions was part of the original vision for the project, meant to allow viewers to see past any divisions between Libyan regions and peoples. Although work remains to be done—unsurprisingly, considering the task of mounting four identical exhibitions across a still-scarred nation—the shows are expected to open in early July in four Libyan cities, Tripoli, Misurata, Benghazi and Zintan, with the goal of providing fodder for debate and discussion about the country’s future among those who come to see the photographs.

“They fear that Libya will not become a good country,” says Liohn. “Still they are not letting the fear keep them from making Libya into what they want.”

Learn more about Almost Dawn in Libya—and the photographers involved at their emphas.is fundraising page here.

Almost Dawn in Libya will be shown on the following schedule:

July 1 – Misurata – Goz-elteek-Hotel
July 4 – Benghazi – Benghazi Museum
July 10 – Tripoli – Dar Al Funnun  – Tripoli Art House
July 12 – Zintan – Zintan Media Center

You can also follow the exhibition’s progress at ADIL‘s Facebook page, here.

Curators Look Ahead to LOOK3

The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear this coming weekend. The annual for-photographers-by-photographers event in Charlottesville, Va. runs June 7-9. But, says Musi, the weekend will include the work of more than one year: professional relationships and the curators’ senses of balance, both developed over many years, were key in the decision process.

The three artists chosen by Musi and Griffin to be this year’s INSight Artists—the featured photographers who, Griffin says, must be people who have made a significant body of work and can inspire other photographers—are Stanley Greene, Donna Ferrato and Alex Webb. Masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman; David Doubilet is this year’s TREES Artist, whose work will be hung in trees along Charlottesville’s downtown pedestrian mall.

Although the festival does not have an explicit theme, Musi says that a documentary slant is strong in all of the featured work. “We also have this crossover because advertising and the fine-art world are really stepping up and doing a lot of what journalism used to do,” he says. And it goes both ways: he cites Hank Willis Thomas as someone who is using journalistic forms outside of the world of journalism. “The common thread,” Musi says. “is that everyone is very excited to have a foot in each world, but the work is very documentary in nature.”

Griffin echoes that sentiment, citing the aesthetic vision evident in Alex Webb’s work as an example of great journalism that “hits that beautiful spot” that touches the art world. He says that this year’s LOOK3 will place a heavier emphasis on individual shows for the speakers’ work, so that guests who attend the talks will be able to see the pictures discussed. There will be more than a dozen hours of onstage programming and a dozen print shows hung, which is more than in previous years.

Both curators agree, though, that the artists who present are not necessarily the highlights of the festival. “This is building a community and sustaining it, so that people go from one side of the stage to the other and back again,” says Musi. That community is made up of artists who attend as viewers, give talks a later year and then maybe teach a workshop some other time.

And artists who just hang out: “There’s a coffee house and it’s right outside of one of the hotels, and I just remember walking out each morning and David Alan Harvey would always be sitting out there having a cup of coffee,” Griffin says of past festivals, “and there’d be Martin Parr sitting with him or Jim Nachtwey, and you’d just walk up and sit down and start talking with a person. That’s one of the really cool things about the festival.”

More information about this year’s LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph, which will take place in Charlottesville, Va., from June 7-9, is available here.

Questions Without Answers Launch @ VII Gallery

Image courtesy of VII

Join Phaidon at VII Gallery on Thursday, May 3rd during the exhibition of Questions Without Answers to celebrate the launch of the long-awaited book of the same name, published in conjunction with the 10th Anniversary of the founding of VII agency.

This major work presents a remarkable sequence of photo-stories from pioneering photo agency VII, documenting world history as we have experienced it since the end of the Cold War. The 11 extraordinarily talented photographers who are part of this agency work at the cutting edge of digital photojournalism, committed to recording social and cultural change as it happens around the world. Each brings an individual vision to the agency – some choosing to tackle dramatic events head-on, others pursuing more idiosyncratic, personal projects – but all share a commitment to their individual subjects and to their belief that the act of communication provides hope even in the most extreme situations.

Questions Without Answers is an ambitious book featuring a strikingly broad selection of photo stories. Photos documenting Barack Obama giving a speech on Afghanistan to American troops sit alongside a collection of portraits featuring famous cultural figures such as David Bowie and Bernardo Bertolucci. We move from an exploration of the spread and impact of AIDS in Asia to dispatches from the current economic crisis and its effect on those working in finance. The crucial work done by VII in documenting conflict – environmental, social and political, both violent and non-violent – is also represented, including stories from the war in Iraq, the crisis in Darfur and the terrible events of 9/11.

With an introduction by the eminent David Friend, the former director of photography at Life magazine, this book is an important, moving and compelling record of the world we live in.

The book includes work by Stephanie Sinclair, and Lynsey Addario, both of whom have been featured in Aperture Magazine and The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture 2011).

Questions Without Answers
Book Launch and Reception

Thursday, May 3, 2012, 7-9pm

VII Gallery
Brooklyn, New York

›› Buy The New York Times Magazine Photographs for 30% off.

Lynsey Addario’s Return to the American Road

The night before the tenth anniversary of September 11, I flew out to San Antonio to begin a three-week road trip across America with TIME columnist Joe Klein, from Laredo, Texas up to Des Moines, Iowa.

In the seat next to me, a beautiful woman sat caring for her quadriplegic son, who was sitting in the adjacent row with her daughter. Susan Bradley and her daughter were tender and attentive with Matt in a way that made me think his injuries were new. I, shooting my first assignment in the U.S. after 11 years of covering conflict in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Congo, Darfur, Lebanon, Somalia and Libya, assumed he was injured at war. Matt was 24, the age of so many young, American men I have spent years with on military embeds in Afghanistan, documenting the war unfolding over the years and witnessing heavy combat and brutal injuries.

As it turns out, Matt had nothing to do with Afghanistan. Like almost everyone Joe and I would meet on the road trip, the war rested on the periphery of their lives, and their primary concerns were here at home. Matt, a football player in college, and the son of a professional football player, had been rafting in Sacramento, California, when he stepped in to rescue a woman being abused by her boyfriend. As Matt walked away, the man allegedly followed him with a mag-light, and beat him on the back of the neck with the heavy flashlight, causing spinal cord injuries that left him paralyzed.

I don’t know why that moment stuck with me. I just immediately connect everything to the wars I have been covering overseas, and that’s not the case back home. I wrongly assumed all Americans at home were as consumed with our troops in Afghanistan as I was abroad.

Over the last decade, I have come to know details about most Afghan warlords, the infinite humanitarian crises across Africa, statistics of maternal mortality rates of women around the world, but I’ve become a stranger in my own country, unfamiliar with the pertinent issues at home and with what Americans are thinking the year before another presidential election. I generally don’t follow domestic news that much aside from how it relates to the stories I’m covering abroad, like what Americans think of the War in Afghanistan.

In three weeks of extensive interviews and casual conversations, I don’t remember a single person, except for veteran Anthony Smith, who was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq, bringing up the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, without being prompted by a pointed question. Almost everyone spoke about the economy, healthcare and unemployment. People are polarized. Some are angry, and many say they are disillusioned with President Obama.

Working with Joe was quite an honor—for me, it was like a free education of politics in America. I sat in a lot of his interviews and asked him a lot of questions. Of course, I felt incredibly ignorant, because so often they were questions I should known the answers to—about politics in the States, who was running, what their platforms were. But I honestly hadn’t been following them that closely because I’ve been gone.

In fact, I’ve been gone so long that it took a while to familiarize myself with what the scenes were of the story in each city, and what the reoccurring topics of discussion were. Once I did that, I felt like I needed more time to go back and actually shoot because we moved so quickly. The pace of traveling to one city a day made it difficult for me to figure out what there was to shoot. It’s not like there was a specific protest or news event going on. It was just the city, or a gas station, or a diner, so I had to really talk to people and find out where I need to be as a photographer.

Overall though, it was really nice to be home. It was nice to be in my own country, where I didn’t need a translator or a driver. Where I didn’t need to figure out cultural references or what hijab I needed to wear to cover my hair. Americans are really lovely people—friendly, kind and willing to help you out. For me, it was incredibly humbling to come back and spend three weeks just talking to Americans all across the country and listening to what they had to stay.

Lynsey Addario is a regular contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

Read Joe Klein’s cover story from the Oct. 24, 2011 issue of TIME [available to subscribers] here.

Tuesday 27 September 2011

Feature and Essays 

First to Middle East…again….

Great series from Gaza by Andrew McConnell on Panos website…

Andrew McConnell: Leaving Gaza (Panos: September 2011)

Rena Effendi: Women of the Egyptian Revolution (Newsweek: September 2011)

David Levene: The Lives of Palestinians (Guardian: September 2011)

Moises Saman: Post-Gaddafi Tripoli (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Natan Dvir: Eighteen (TIME LB: September 2011) Arab Teens in Israel

Olga Kravets: The Shelter (Salt Images: September 2011)

Adam Ferguson: Afghanistan Soldiers Skyping (TIME LB: September 2011)

Graham Crouch: Red Cross Kabul (FotoStrada: 2011)

To other features…

Joseph Rodriguez: Welcome to Newburgh, Murder Capital of New York (New York Magazine: September 2011) article

Todd Heisler: Sound Stages in New York (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Sven Torfinn: In Uganda, Losing Land to Planted Trees (NYT: September 2011)

Thilde Jensen: Canaries (NYT: September 2011)

Gesche Würfel: Basement Sancturies (Foto8: September 2011) Würfel’s website

Lucy Nicholson: A Gay Military Family (Reuters: September 2011)

Tom Hyde: After the Fall (burn: September 2011)

From VII…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind in VII magazine…see later in this blog post for some VII transition related news…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind:  Resurgence of the Cossacks (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Ron Haviv: Glimpses of the Fall of Tripoli (VII: September 2011)

Mikolaj Nowacki: The River Odra (VII Mentor: September 2011) Nowacki’s website

I don’t remember if I posted this already earlier… quite possibly…Lynsey Addario’s NGM series on Baghdad on VII website…

Lynsey Addario: Baghdad (VII Network: September 2011)

Mads Nissen: Bessarabian Blues (Panos: September 2011)

Long 40 photo edit of Andrea Star-Reese’s Urban Cave…

Andrea Star-Reese: Urban Cave (Visionproject.org: 2011)

Maciej Dakowicz Cardiff nightlife photos were heavily discussed last week after being published in Daily Mail…Here the photos in NYT Lens…Comments in the Guardian and BBC

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff After Dark (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Myrto Papadopoulos: In the Grecian Caves Where Time Slows  Down (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Kosuke Okahara: Transnistria: An Unrecognized State Caught Between Past and Present (TIME LB: September 2011)

Max Whittaker: 80 on 80 (Prime Collective: September 2011)

David Walter Banks: Craziest Vacation Spots (Newsweek: September 2011)

Washington Post: Reframing Mexico (WP: September 2011) Reframing Mexico project website

John Vink: Cambodia Land Issues (Magnum: September 2011)

Finlay Mackay: London 2012 (TIME LB: September 2011)

Dan Giannopoulos: The Orphaned Elderly of Kathmandu (TIME LB: September 2011)

Peter Funch: Composite Characters (TIME LB: September 2011)

Brian Cassey: Soulless in Seoul (Fotostrada: 2011)

Paul Russell: Country Shows (BBC: September 2011)

“Your friend doesn’t have a fucking pool!” Alec Baldwin and other portraits by Jake Chessum…

Jake Chessum: Celebrity Portraits (Life.com: September 2011)

Agencies

VII Photo is going through some changes… British Journal of Photography’s news editor Olivier Laurent is keeping us up-to-date with news as they come in…So far, BJP has confirmed Stefano de Luigi will be full member, whereas VII Mentor Agnes Dherbeys has left VII to be an independent photographer. At the moment, Olivier has unconfirmed  list of photographers who have been offered  full membership with the agency and I’d imagine we’ll get the confirmations very soon…

BJP: VII Photo in transition (BJP: September 2011)

Stephen Mayes did imply in his comments that not everyone has been accepted, but it it would seen most of the Network photographers, such as Lynsey Addario, Ashley Gilbertson and Tomas van Houtryve,  have been made full members…No word on the future status of previous Network photographers Gafic, Kurzen, Domaniczky, Bouvet, or Bruce at the moment, or any of the VII Mentor photographers apart from Dherbeys…I’d imagine a lot of the Mentor photographers staying in that category, as it was only Network that’s gets disbanded…I have word that no new Mentor photographers were taken in at this time.

I can confirm that Anastasia Taylor-Lind, despite not being included in the BJP’s ‘unconfirmed list’ at time of writing this, has been offered full membership. Until now she was part of VII Mentor.

I was skyping with Anastasia earlier today, and asked about her initial reaction:

After 2 years on the VII mentor program under the guidance of Ron Haviv, I am utterly delighted and honored to become part of VII Photo. The mentor program is a wonderful and successful idea, and something I am really proud to have been part of. I’m excited about my future at VII and being part of an exceptional group of photographers, who are in turn supported by wonderful agency staff.”

Congratulations! Well deserved.  You can find Anastasia’s website here and blog with recent tear sheets here.

Speaking of VII…

Books

Fancy a look inside VII’s upcoming Questions Without Answers book? Yeah? Well, see here for sample pdf.

photo: Joachim Ladefoged from series, A Vanishing Way of Life, 2003

Slideshow in their archive

Should be a great book…. Would also love this…

The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture 2011)

Afterwards: Contemporary Photography Confronting the Past (Thames&Hudson: 2011)

Communities

Emphas.is September 2011 newsletter

Videos

National Geographic: Search for the Afghan Girl Pt 1 |Pt 2 | Pt 3 | Pt 4

Interviews

Kathy Ryan on The New York Times Magazine Photographs book (spd.org: 2011)

Danfung Dennis : Hell and Back Again (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Alec Soth (The New York Times Magazine’s 6th Floor blog: September 2011)

Victoria Will trying to convince 35mm photographers to try out Hasselblad…tasteful advertising….(unlike)

Victoria Will (Hasselblad US: 2011)

Fred Ritchin : What Matters Now (La Lettre: September 2011)

Steve McCurry (Oprah)

Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols : National Geographic photographer ditches website, turns to the iPad (BJP: September 2011)

Olivia Arthur (IdeasTap)

Farzana Wahidy (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Elizabeth Hingley (e-photoreview: September 2011)

Erik De Castro : Back in Afghanistan, ten years later (Reuters photo blog: September 2011)

Nick Oza (Image Deconstructed: September 2011)

Articles

“Hard times have spawned great art — but not these hard times, it seems.”

LA Times: Where’s today’s Dorothea Lange? (LA Times: September 2011)

Guardian: The excess is not in alcohol but in Britain’s self-loathing  (Guardian: September 2011) Maciej Dakowicz’s pictures of Cardiff revellers are lapped up by a country that pictures itself as broken, boozing, morally sick

PhotoShelter blog has a piece about the most dangerous places to work as a photographer…

photo: Sebastian Meyer

PhotoShelter: The 14 Most Dangerous Locations For Photojournalists (PhotoShelter: September 2011)

NYT piece on AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus’ At War exhibition in Berlin…

NYT: At Berlin Show, One Photographer’s View of the Post-Sept. 11 World (NYT: September 2011)

Reportage by Getty Images:  “Hi, my name is Spain, and this is my story.”(Reportage: September 2011)

From Telegraph's Telephoto...

Telegraph: Afghanistan? There’s an app for that (Telegraph: September 2011) The humble iPhone is changing photography on the frontline

Telegraph: Revealing landscapes: the photography of Joel Sternfeld (Telegraph: September 2011)

BJP: Could Once Magazine, an iPad-only photography magazine, represent a new revenue stream for photojournalists? (BJP: September 2011)

BJP: Harry Ransom Center acquires Elliott Erwitt’s archives (BJP: September 2011)

BJP: Ways of Looking Bradford photography festival (BJP: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist, Mark Blinch (Guardian: September 2011)

Verve: Chelsea MacLachlan (Verve: September 2011)

PDN: Beatles Photographer Robert Whitaker Dies

PDN: Top 10 iPad photo portfolio Apps for the iPad

Bill Gates v. Photojournalists (Concertiumnews.com: 2011)

Seven by Five: Who is using your photos without permission?

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Application open for the inaugural Tim Hetherington grant

News and Documentary Emmys : Tim Hetherington’s and Sebastian Junger’s Restrepo won two Emmys (Outstanding Continuing Coverage of a News Story, Long Form, and an editing award for Outstanding Individual Achievement In A Craft)

Luis Valtuena International Humanitarian Photography award

New Scholarships Available For Photojournalists Returning To School : NPPA

Lucas Dolega Award

TIME is looking for the best young photographers of 2011…NB. Only US students need apply it seems

TIME : Next Generation : Submissions will be accepted beginning October 3, 2011, at 12 a.m. EST, until midnight on October 17, 2011. Winners will be announced on LightBox on October 26, 2011.

Jobs

Ben Curtis, Middle East photo editor for AP, named chief photographer for East Africa

Part time multimedia coordinator :  ActionAid : London

Fundraising

Human Right Watch: Facing Power: A Print Sale to Benefit Human Rights (HRW)

Events

Festival of Photography : Wild Day : Sunday 2 October 2011 : Royal Geographical Society : London | full program PDF

Services

Luxlab

To finish off…

Rude hand gestures of the world

If you are like me and not really into computer games, perhaps this ‘war journalism game’ Warco will get even us excited…or not…

Warco

and…

10 photo compliments

Photographer #326: Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario, 1973, USA, is a photojournalist who has traveled to many conflict zones. She has been to numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. She often focuses on the situations of women in these places, where violence or poverty are part of daily life. Since 2000, while still under the Taliban rule, she has been to Afghanistan on many occasions. A recent body of work is Veiled Rebellion, a photo essay exploring the lives of women in Afghanistan. The series was featured in the December issue of the National Geographic. She has received numerous awards. Lynsey is a self-taught photographer. While covering the unrest in Lybia she was captured by the troops of Ghaddafi for six days. The following images come from the series Veiled Rebellion, Women at War and Darfur.


Website: www.lynseyaddario.com

Lynsey Addario on NPR

201mag01_fets004r1_96a_lr

Photograph courtesy Lynsey Addario/VII network. Featured in Aperture issue 201.

Click here to hear photojournalist Lynsey Addario’s account of being captured, along with three others, by Libyan rebels in March. Addario was interviewed by Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne, and she relates how they were taken by Moammar Gadhafi’s soldiers after retreating from rebel fire at a checkpoint near Benghazi. They were released on March 21 after several days of abuse and threats to their lives. Lynsey Addario: At War, a selection of images focused on women soldiers in Afghanistan, was featured in Aperture magazine issue 201.

Wednesday 23 March 2011

So we finally got the good news on Monday that Addario, Hicks, Farrell, and Shadid had been released. You can read the account of their detention on the New York Times website…

Articles – NYT: 4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality (NYT: March 2011) an earlier article Freed Times Journalists Give Account of Captivity

Articles – CPJ: Times reporters freed in Libya; 13 still missing, detained (CPJ: March 2011)

NB. Joe Raedle of Getty and David Clark and Roberto Schmidt of AFP, mentioned in the CPJ article above have been reported free this morning and leaving Libya.

Articles – BJP: Reuters’ photographer Goran Tomasevic scores front page success (BJP: March 2011)

Alex Majoli’s Libya work in black and white now on Magnum site… There are several photos in there that were previously shown in colour on Newsweek’s site..I think I prefer the black and white ones….

Features and Essays – Alex Majoli: Libya Uprising (Magnum: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Franco Pagetti: Libya, Dreaming of a Revolution (VII: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Luis Sinco: Libya (LA Times: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Andy Rocchelli, Gabriele Micalizzi: Libya Civil War (Cesuralab: March 2011)

Ben Lowy has been posting some  iPhone Hipstas from Libya on his Tumblr…

Tumblr Ben Lowy

Christopher Morris’ updated Libya gallery on Lightbox here.

Features and Essays – Marco Salustro: Volunteer Human Shields in Tripoli (Corbis: March 2011)

Interviews – Patrick Baz Is in His Element in Libya (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Backstory on the release of the Guardian’s Ghaith Abdul Ahad from Libya last week (via @foodforyoureyes)…

Articles – Press Gazzette: Guardian editor gives credit to Turkey and Libya as he reveals inside story of Ghaith Abdul-Ahad’s release (Press Gazzette: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Baptiste Giroudon: Egypt:Life after the Revolution (Photographer’s website: March 2011)

Articles – BagNewsNotes: Alan Chin on the Middle East: Ghosts of Suez and Srebrenica (BNN: March 2011)

Articles – BagNewsNotes: Nicole Tung in Eastern Libya: Fresh To My Virgin Eyes (BNN: March 2011) (NB: post includes one extremely graphic image)

Articles – Jorg Colberg: A War of Images (Conscientious: March 2011)

Over 1,600 clicks on the ‘photo within a photo’ from Libya seen below, that I put on Twitpic the other day… So here it is again.. On the left you can see Paul Conroy’s photo, and if you look closely, you can see a pair of legs behind Tyler Hicks (first photographer from the right). I’m fairly certain, those legs belong to Yuri Kozyrev, who is taking the photo on the right pretty much at the same exact moment… Fairly random observation, I know, but still kinda interesting I thought…

To Japan..

From Newsweek…

Features and Essays – Q. Sakamaki: Aftermath (Newsweek: March 2011) Japan

Features and Essays – Peter Blakely: Japan: Relief Efforts Amid the Devastation (Newsweek: March 2011) Blakely’s website

MSNBC has a section titled Outside The Frame on their Photoblog, where AP photojournalist David Guttenfelder shares his experience covering the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan…A bit like the Backstory in Lightbox

Features and Essays – MSNBC: Outside the Frame (MSNBC: March 2011)

They also have panoramics from Japan on the Photoblog here, as well as some  ‘Japan before and after the earthquake, tsunami’ sliders

Some panoramic composites also on Lightbox, slightly differently executed though, and surprisingly by nobody other than James Nachtwey… 

Dispatch from Japan: James Nachtwey’s Impressions in Words and Pictures

Domic Nahr’s updated Japan gallery on Lightbox here.

Great BJP article on photographers working in Japan at the moment…

Articles – BJP: Japan Earthquake: Photographing the aftermath (BJP: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Donald Weber: Capital of the Third Millennium (VII Network: March 2011) Brasilia, Brazil

Looking forward to seeing this movie, although I am a bit sceptical as to whether it’ll be any good…

MoviesBang Bang Club trailer (Apple)

Articles – BJP: Movie to recount Bang Bang Club’s story (BJP: March 2011)

2011 FotoEvidence Book Award Winner…

Interviews Paula Bronstein (Fotoevidence: March 2011)

Interviews – Terry O’Neill (Telegraph: March 2011)

Awards The shortlist for the first World Press Photo multimedia contest has been announced (WPP: March 2011) From BJP

Articles / Tutorials and Tips – Mike Davis: Some Things To Consider When Entering Contests (Mike Davis blog: March 2011)

Videos – Joel Meyerowitz 1981 Film

Articles -PDN: Appropriation Artist Richard Prince Liable for Infringement, Court Rules (PDN: March 2011) Also:  A Photo Editor: Richard Prince Loses Fair Use Argument (APE: March 2011)

Articles – Phaidon: Martin Parr takes cover for Esquire’s 20th anniversary (Phaidon: March 2011)

Agencies David Chancellor joins Institute

Exhibitions – Tate Modern: Burke + Norfolk: Photographs From The War In Afghanistan : 6 May  –  10 July 2011 : Free entry!

Events – Contact VS ASA Collective Slideshow evening (NB: Facebook link), 1st April : London

Exhibitions – Laura Hynd, Michael Grieve, JH Engstrom and Tereza Zelenkova are on show at the Oblong Gallery until 23 March (BJP: March 2011)

I went to University College of Falmouth second year BA Press and Editorial Photography students’ exhibition, Progression, at Calument London…It’s a show of 34 photographs, one by each of the students on the course.

The exhibition is up for a month. Go and have a look if you happen to wonder around the Euston area in London, or have business in the aforementioned establishment. Big thanks to Dan Cainey for having invited me to the opening. Several promising works on display, so it was a pleasure.

BlogsHere by Harry Hardie

PhotographersYunghi Kim

Photographers Shamil Tanna

PhotographersTal Cohen