Tag Archives: 1000 Words

London Art Fair 2 for 1 ticket offer

London Art Fair is one of the UK’s premier destinations for modern British and contemporary art, bringing together 129 leading galleries from the UK and overseas.

Alongside the main fair, two curated sections focus on younger galleries, new work and contemporary photography; Art Projects and Photo50. Photo50 is an exhibition of contemporary photography featuring fifty works, curated this year by Nick Hackworth, Director of the excellent Paradise Row gallery. Entitled, A Cyclical Poem, it will bring together the work of a number of British photojournalists and documentary photographers from the 1970s to the present day including Brian Griffin, Paul Hill, Sirrka-Lisa Kontinen, Dorothy Bohm, Marketa Luscakova and Chris Steele-Perkins. The exhibition is an elliptical meditation on the idea of historical change, instances separated by eras, of congruence and difference; it considers what has changed and what has stayed the same.

The fair keeps its doors open late on Thursday 17 January, providing you with the opportunity to look at the work by over 1,000 artists whilst enjoying complimentary drinks, talks and performances.

1000 Words readers can purchase 2 for 1 advanced tickets for this evening; just enter code LAF467 when booking to activate your discount. Offer valid until midnight 31 December 2012. Book here!

MacdonaldStrand

All images © MacdonaldStrand

Brad Feuerhelm considers the participatory aspects and iconic violence in Most Popular of All Time, a new book by MacdonaldStrand.

Having picked up the latest self-published title from husband and wife team MacdonaldStrand (Clare Strand and Gordon Macdonald), I have come away with a greater sense of what photographic practice can bring about when disseminated through the line of the pencil, darkly. As photography becomes more and more synonymous with that of conceptual art practice, the mantra of the iconic within the medium begins to permeate a greater need for understanding for our own associations with images that take on a totemic value. A photograph with ‘iconic status’ is an instantly recognised yet sometimes little understood visual cadence that explodes across the world in daily consummation of news and media alike. How do we recognise, process, receive, and finally retransmit its symbolic value over time? How do we train our minds to adhere to a group formula for understanding these visual markers of progress and detriment? And finally, how to we reinterpret this material and send it back out into the world to promote its niche capacity for several understandings within the visual language of the time – past, present, and future?
The works contained within the superb Most Popular of All Time invoke such questions. The project results from an online survey conducted by the artist/curator duo, whereby users were asked to name their most iconic images. These photographs have become so ubiquitous that it is hard to see their content and they have become detached from their context.From the information gathered, MacdonaldStrand took the resulting images and reduced them to line drawings with ‘connect-the-dot’ numbered points. Left half-finished, the image is then to be completed by the further drawing on the part of the viewer.
All colour is drained, all traces of photographic grey scale removed. It is a simple yet effective conceit to reduce photography to that of line, but also embedded within the work is the ability to promote the ‘punctum’ of its iconic status with a participatory function – it brings the viewer into a complicit rendering of line and photographic management of iconic status.
Within the works selected for re-purposing are Eddie Adams famous ‘execution’ image and Richard Drew’s Falling Man. These pictures in and of themselves capture very difficult conditions of humanity and the role of observer within. The majority of the images displayed are of a horrific base and coalesce our need to exult difficult imagery into that of lore and legend, that of description and representation which is often fraught with a tension not found in other mediums. In short, they are epic tales of pleasure and pain, ecstasy and absence.
Yet representation is not the exclusive aim within the book nor the works themselves, but rather they evoke a need to understand how we as a collective society enable these icons caught on film (or file) and how we redistribute their meaning and function as the photograph itself. The structures of violence, the poignantly horrific, and the sometimes misunderstood signifiers of our collective photographic imagination delineated by the direct act of hand on paper.
The works are also available for an incredibly economic rate, which is also clever given the material. I have purchased all images within the show for less than £100. But in doing so I understand what exactly it is I am enabling. MacdonaldStrand have chosen a crafty and intelligent way to examine and exclude some of the icons of photography through something as commonplace as a pencil. Time and the flow of chaos have been reduced to the materially manageable. 

Brad Feuerhelm

Spencer Murphy


All images © Spencer Murphy

Spencer Murphy’s name should ring a bell thanks to his editorial commissions which has seen his photography published in such places as The Guardian Weekend, Telegraph Magazine, New Statesman, and the FT Weekend. He has also been included in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize no less than five times!

Here though are extracts from a personal project, a delicate and visually understated series entitled The Abyss Gazes Into You. It offers a gentle and thoughtful glimpse of Murphy’s use of the landscape as inspiration and as a means to discover something within him.

“These images are a reflection of something inside myself – a feeling of both being trapped and floating endlessly in time and space, a mixture of hope and despair, desolation and beauty,” says Murphy.

“The sense, perhaps, of what it is to live a finite life in an infinite universe. They are pictures that, to me, hint at the unfathomable scale not only of the universe, but of life itself. They are instances in which, by accident or design, I have found myself staring once more into the abyss, and the abyss has momentarily returned my gaze.”

Lofty themes and grand claims, but does the work bear the weight of these words? Check out more from the series here and decide for yourselves. We are giving him the benefit of the doubt.

Born in 1978, Murphy grew up in the Kentish countryside and studied photography at University College Falmouth, graduating in 2002. Murphy now lives and works in London.

Rafael Arocha

All images © Rafael Arocha

“Photography keeps me alert,” writes Rafael Arocha by way of introduction to his project entitled Midnight. “The photographic process allows me to critically and creatively understand, and get closer to different situations, feelings and people, learning more about my own thoughts and inner emotions. I believe this process allows the photographer to discover and connect with his/her obsessions, doubts, intellect and memory.”
With more than a whiff of Anders Petersen, this imagery plumbs the heart of grimness. Alive to the presence of human flesh, it looks at the relationship between instinct and desire, where night time is the stage set on which courtship becomes ritualistic. Filtered through his uncompromising lens are scenes, incidents and gestures that become transformed into things of profound and often awkward beauty.
“Midnight refers to a fleeting moment,” Arocha goes on to explain, “a line that divides one moment in time from another. It is then that a transformation happens, a metamorphosis, and an instinctive drive, from deep within, offers us the opportunity to show ourselves as less ordinary. Things happen, sometimes unnoticed, which reflect our own obsessions or fantasies. Non-verbal codes are used to communicate, and once interpreted, they become intimate longing and desire.”
Rafael Arocha was born in 1978, in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Click here to view more work from the series. To learn about his practice visit www.rafaelarocha.com

1000 Words Photography Magazine 14

We are delighted to announce that issue 14 of our online magazine is now live. Links backlinks blog comments . To view it, please go to: www.1000wordsmag.com
This issue is dedicated to the memory of Rosina Darch (1924-2012).
For this Autumn edition we have chosen the theme of Murmur. Silent vibrations and fugitive apparitions, the imagery showcased here derives its brilliance in the shape of its understatement, and the art at its core. Artists who translate lived experience into a pattern of photography that preserves its vitality, drawing out psychological complexities and subtleties. They are storytellers, yet their voices are calm, measured and appropriate.
Exploring that which connects and concerns the photography we have brought together, Louise Clements reports back on Eva Stenrams gently feminist exhibition which formed part of The Discovery Award at this years Les Rencontres dArles; also plucked from the French festival is the ethereal and melancholic work of Belarus photographer Alexandra Catiere whose series Here, Beyond The Mists is accompanied by a text from Natasha Christia; Lucy Davies of The Daily Telegraph describes a path through the work of recent RCA graduate Regine Petersen in particular Find a Falling Star, a project about Meteorites and everything; Brad Feuerhelm meets Esther Teichmann and bring us an insightful interview with the German-American artist, looking at the origins of fantasy and desire and how these are bound to experiences of loss and representation.
Elsewhere, Anouk Kruithof serves up a lively (inte)review with the formidable artist duo Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarinon the occasion of their latest photobook, a collection of Polaroids that forms an intimate and imperfect inventory of their fifteen-year collaboration, produced in collaboration with Self Publish Be Happy; and finally, Gerry Badger discusses Paul Grahams The Present, his much anticipated volume which explores both photographys relationship with time, the present, and the nature of photographic narrative, or in this case, with non-narrative.
In our dedicated Books section, David Moore lays bare the facts about Lise Safartis She, Michael Grieve gives his verdict on Soho, the latest in an ongoing series of city studies by Anders Petersen while Brad Feuerhelm ponders the authenticity of Nicholas Comments Mexico City Waltz.

Once again, 1000 thanks to our photographers and writers, editorial and art departments as well as of course our advertisers and funders for making this magazine possible.

Announcing the winners of The 1000 Words Award

1000 Words is proud to announce the results of the inaugural 1000 Words Award for European photographers.

Having attracted considerable interest from a diverse spectrum of committed and passionate photographers, the standard of the open submissions was exceptionally high. And while the deliberations were difficult, the judges selected in their opinion, four photographers who could most benefit from the mentoring and workshop experience and go on to produce interesting and innovative bodies of work from having the time to focus on their practice.

In total, 348 submissions were received from 24 EU member countries.


The winners are: Henrik Malmström (b. 1983, Finland), Lucy Levene (b.1978, United Kingdom), Tereza Zelenkova (b. 1985, Czech Republic) and Virgílio Ferreira (b. 1970, Portugal).


At the core of my practice I seek to destabilise different subjects by reassessing their potential as metaphors for broader questions surrounding photography’s capability for representation and its relationship with the real. My latest work is an installation that comprises of a series of black and white photographs and several objects from my personal collection. This work can be understood as a metaphor for the night as a time associated with both inspiration and imagination, but also melancholia, solitude and isolation. The darkness of the night, like the darkness inside a camera, is a space where images are conjured. Here I am not really interested in the images brought to us by dreams but rather by that point of insomniac vigilance when one can no longer recognise what’s a dream and what’s reality; when familiar objects start to take on shapes of something else, undergoing a sort of metamorphoses. Tereza Zelenkova




A series of un-staged images taken in an Edinburgh nightclub. The title is from the poem by Maya Angelou; Come, And Be My Baby.
Lucy Levene


This series deals with ideas of intangibility related to states of being, by capturing candid moments of anonymous people in the streets of London. In these pictures I attempt to evoke those feelings of vulnerability, bewilderment, impermanence and solitude, which are related to the uncertain times that we live in. They are haunted depictions of our world, and maybe they reflect us.

In these photo-chemical experiments the use of light has a double function: it both records and destroys the information in the picture, denying any secure reality. These manipulations are made on the moment of capture, and all the process of image transformations happens inside the apparatus. Virgílio Ferreira






My work up until now has always been connected to home and identity. I like to challenge myself into finding new perspectives and angles in a search for how things can be represented. Sometimes it can appear as fiction, but still there is always a deeper social aspect to it.
Henrik Malmström  

The 1000 Words Award for European photographers is a major initiative in collaboration with The Other European Travellers, a project co-ordinated by Cobertura Photo and co-organised by Atelier de Visu1000 Words and Festival Voci di Foto in partnership with Magnum Photos. It is part-funded by The Education Audiovisual and Culture Exchange Agency (EACEA) under the auspices of the EU Culture Programme.

Photographers were invited through open submission to apply for an opportunity to realise a new body of work with the supervision of several high-profile photographers and industry experts.
The 1000 Words Award includes:
• £1,000 cash prize
• 18 month mentorship programme
• 3 workshops with Jeffrey Silverthorne, Antoine d’Agata and Patrick Zachmann in London, Marseille and Seville respectively, including financial assistance with accommodation and travel
• Travelling group exhibition through the UK, France, Spain and Italy
• Catalogue and DVD
• Feature in 1000 Words Photography Magazine.
The 1000 Words Award selection panel were:
• Simon Baker, Curator of Photography at Tate
• Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, London
• Dewi Lewis, Director at Dewi Lewis Publishing
• Tim Clark and Michael Grieve, Editors at 1000 Words Photography Magazine.

The 1000 Words Award and The Other European Travellers have been supported, in part, by The Education Audiovisual and Culture Exchange Agency (EACEA).

1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV IN FEZ, MOROCCO, 5-9 NOVEMBER 2012

© Boris Mikhailov

1000 Words is greatly honoured to announce our next workshop with the Ukrainian artist/photographer Boris Mikhailov in Fez, Morocco (5-9 November 2012). This is a very rare occasion to learn from one of the most highly-regarded contemporary photographers from the field of art and documentary.

“As a photographer with unofficial authority I discover, I observe, I clandestinely stalk.” Boris Mikhailov
BORIS MIKHAILOV:
Born in 1938, Boris Mikhailov is one of the most important photographers to have emerged from the former USSR. Starting photography in the 1960’s his work transgressed the moral and political dictates of the Soviet Regime. Although often engaged in the social disintegration affecting his country his work is subjectively rooted, dealing with the profound concerns of vulnerability and mortality. He has exhibited in numerous galleries and museums around the world notably the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, MOMA, and The Photographers’ Gallery, London. His projects Case History, The Wedding, Unfinished Dissertation, Look at Me I Look at Water, have been published as books. Boris Mikhailov was the recipient of the prestigious Hasselblad Award in 2000 and the Citibank Photography Prize in 2001.


ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:
The 1000 Words Workshop takes place in an authentically restored riadsituated in the medieval medina, at the heart of the beautifully evocative city of Fez, Morocco. The workshop will be an intense experience lasting five days between 5-9 May 2012 and will consist of 12 participants. The medina is a vibrant labyrinth that will permeate all the senses. Surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, it offers a visually stunning backdrop for this truly unique workshop.

We are looking for a diverse range of participants who understand the work of Boris Mikhailov and feel that their own art will benefit from his guidance. 

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:
The cost of the workshop will be £1250 for 5 days. Once participants have been selected they will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit of £500 within two weeks. Participants can then pay the rest of the fee according to deadlines (see below). Participants are encouraged to arrive the day before the workshop begins for a welcome dinner. The price includes:

-tuition from Boris Mikhailov (including defining each participants project; shooting; editing sessions; creating a coherent body of work; creation of a slide show; projection of the images of the participants.)
-a welcome and farewell dinner
-lunch everyday and snacks during the afternoon
-24 hour help from the 1000 Words team and an assistant/translator with local knowledge.

Participants will be expected to make their own travel arrangements and find accommodation, which in Fez can range from £150 upwards for the week. We can advise on finding the accommodation that best suits you. Remember that most of your time will be spent either at the riad or shooting. For photographers using colour film we will provide the means for processing and a scanner. Photographers shooting digital will be expected to bring all necessary equipment. Please note that for the purposes and practicalities of a workshop, digital really is advisable. All participants should also bring a laptop if they have one. Every effort will be made to accommodate individual technical needs.

ABOUT US:
The organisations flagship is 1000 Words, an online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography in the UK and beyond. It reviews exhibitions and photobooks and publishes interviews, essays alongside carefully curated imagery, often around a particular theme. We are committed to showing the work of lesser-known but significant photographers alongside that of established practitioners in the aim of bringing their work to a wider audience. Often incredibly diverse in terms of subjects, concepts, styles and techniques, yet whilst always foregrounding the subjectivity of documentary art photography, 1000 Words intends to explore the limits and possibilities of the medium.

Released quarterly, the magazine attracts over 140,000 unique visitors from more than 120 countries every month. In May 2010 the 1000 Words Blog was ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs as part of a survey carried out by Creative Tourist and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts Photography Blog of the Year Award, 2010.

Yet 1000 Words is much more than just an online magazine. 1000 Words also operates a programme of exhibitions and events including workshops, artist talks, portfolio reviews, prizes and awards. 

1000 Words is governed by its board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are: Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark. The 1000 Words Workshops are organised by Tim Clark, founder and editor-in-chief at 1000 Words and Michael Grieve, 1000 Words deputy editor, senior lecturer at Nottingham Trent University and a photographer represented by Agence Vu. 


TESTIMONIALS:
“I have had the most profoundly moving, fascinating, difficult, wonderful week of my life. Thank you 1000 Words. Words can not describe. I have been continuing with my project. It feels different here, of course. And much slower progress. But still shooting with the same or similar mindset. All connected to what I did in Morocco. Really, really missing everyone. I feel privileged, truly, to have been part of it. Have been in the countryside with my parents since getting back and finally showed my mum the slideshow, with music that had been spinning around my head. She cried.” Laura 

“The Erik Kessels workshop in Fez has been a fantastic and motivational experience that I will carry with me my whole life.” Andy

“The choice of city (Fez) to develop such an educational and inspirational workshop is amazing, since the immersion begins as soon as you arrive. You are induced to leave your comfort zone and search for new references and perspectives, and given that the culture and language are so unique they also become great ingredients in this creative quest. The whole infrastructure offered during the workshop and also the specific venue where the meetings and tutorial activities took place were all part of the environment, serving to create a peaceful and harmonic atmosphere that continuously inspired us all during the workshop.” Alan

Antoine DAgata workshop in Fez was a mind shaking experience, and for me that was just what I needed! Antoines repeated question to me was, “but what do you want?” What a simple question it may seem but to truly honestly answer this was one of the hardest things. Antoine struggled with me daily to be truthful to the process of shooting and to my work. Trying to do this as a white woman in a muslim foreign country seemed scary at first. But soon enough this fear pushed me to go farther than I had before. To take more risks and be more bold. In the end, I had allowed myself to befriend men and women who were at first just strangers on the street. My once beautiful but safely intimate portraiture became more real for me, evoking not only the fear of letting myself leap in a strange place but in the process of doing so, being able to see so much more in others.

The workshop venue was such a treat and incredible place to be able to go to every day. A sanctuary to rest and to edit and collect your thoughts. A place to run into your fellow work shoppers and bounce around ideas. The food was more than I had expected and in fact pretty much the best food I ate in Morocco in my three weeks travel. Tim and Michael were so on top of the workshop; they were there managing every detail from accommodations, food, coordinating the class meetings, running film to labs, scanning, and even just being sweet and kind pals to talk with about your day or have a beer with and brainstorm about your project.

All in all, this workshop could not have been better and I feel so lucky to have had such an opportunity. Antoines phenomenal out of the box thinking and honesty is one of a kind. 1000 Words workshops fall into the ‘do not miss this’ category!” Katie

HOW TO SUBMIT:
We require that you send 10 images as low res jpegs and/or a link to your website, as well as a short biography and statement about why you think it will be relevant for you to work with Boris (approx. 200 words total). Submissions are to be sent to [email protected] with the following subject header: SUBMISSION FOR 1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV.

01 October 2012: Deadline for applications
03 October 2012: Successful candidates contacted
12 October 2012: Deposit due (£500)
31 October 2012: Second installment due (£750)
04 November 2012: Arrive in Morocco for welcoming dinner
05 November 2012: Workshop begins
09 November 2012: Workshop ends

Удачи!


1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV IN FEZ, MOROCCO, 5-9 NOVEMBER 2012

© Boris Mikhailov

1000 Words is greatly honoured to announce our next workshop with the Ukrainian artist/photographer Boris Mikhailov in Fez, Morocco (5-9 November 2012). This is a very rare occasion to learn from one of the most highly-regarded contemporary photographers from the field of art and documentary.

“As a photographer with unofficial authority I discover, I observe, I clandestinely stalk.” Boris Mikhailov
BORIS MIKHAILOV:
Born in 1938, Boris Mikhailov is one of the most important photographers to have emerged from the former USSR. Starting photography in the 1960’s his work transgressed the moral and political dictates of the Soviet Regime. Although often engaged in the social disintegration affecting his country his work is subjectively rooted, dealing with the profound concerns of vulnerability and mortality. He has exhibited in numerous galleries and museums around the world notably the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, MOMA, and The Photographers’ Gallery, London. His projects Case History, The Wedding, Unfinished Dissertation, Look at Me I Look at Water, have been published as books. Boris Mikhailov was the recipient of the prestigious Hasselblad Award in 2000 and the Citibank Photography Prize in 2001.


ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:
The 1000 Words Workshop takes place in an authentically restored riadsituated in the medieval medina, at the heart of the beautifully evocative city of Fez, Morocco. The workshop will be an intense experience lasting five days between 5-9 May 2012 and will consist of 12 participants. The medina is a vibrant labyrinth that will permeate all the senses. Surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, it offers a visually stunning backdrop for this truly unique workshop.

We are looking for a diverse range of participants who understand the work of Boris Mikhailov and feel that their own art will benefit from his guidance. 

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:
The cost of the workshop will be £1250 for 5 days. Once participants have been selected they will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit of £500 within two weeks. Participants can then pay the rest of the fee according to deadlines (see below). Participants are encouraged to arrive the day before the workshop begins for a welcome dinner. The price includes:

-tuition from Boris Mikhailov (including defining each participants project; shooting; editing sessions; creating a coherent body of work; creation of a slide show; projection of the images of the participants.)
-a welcome and farewell dinner
-lunch everyday and snacks during the afternoon
-24 hour help from the 1000 Words team and an assistant/translator with local knowledge.

Participants will be expected to make their own travel arrangements and find accommodation, which in Fez can range from £150 upwards for the week. We can advise on finding the accommodation that best suits you. Remember that most of your time will be spent either at the riad or shooting. For photographers using colour film we will provide the means for processing and a scanner. Photographers shooting digital will be expected to bring all necessary equipment. Please note that for the purposes and practicalities of a workshop, digital really is advisable. All participants should also bring a laptop if they have one. Every effort will be made to accommodate individual technical needs.



ABOUT US:
The organisations flagship is 1000 Words, an online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography in the UK and beyond. It reviews exhibitions and photobooks and publishes interviews, essays alongside carefully curated imagery, often around a particular theme. We are committed to showing the work of lesser-known but significant photographers alongside that of established practitioners in the aim of bringing their work to a wider audience. Often incredibly diverse in terms of subjects, concepts, styles and techniques, yet whilst always foregrounding the subjectivity of documentary art photography, 1000 Words intends to explore the limits and possibilities of the medium.

Released quarterly, the magazine attracts over 140,000 unique visitors from more than 120 countries every month. In May 2010 the 1000 Words Blog was ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs as part of a survey carried out by Creative Tourist and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts Photography Blog of the Year Award, 2010.

Yet 1000 Words is much more than just an online magazine. 1000 Words also operates a programme of exhibitions and events including workshops, artist talks, portfolio reviews, prizes and awards. 

1000 Words is governed by its board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are: Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark. The 1000 Words Workshops are organised by Tim Clark, founder and editor-in-chief at 1000 Words and Michael Grieve, 1000 Words deputy editor, senior lecturer at Nottingham Trent University and a photographer represented by Agence Vu. 


TESTIMONIALS:
“I have had the most profoundly moving, fascinating, difficult, wonderful week of my life. Thank you 1000 Words. Words can not describe. I have been continuing with my project. It feels different here, of course. And much slower progress. But still shooting with the same or similar mindset. All connected to what I did in Morocco. Really, really missing everyone. I feel privileged, truly, to have been part of it. Have been in the countryside with my parents since getting back and finally showed my mum the slideshow, with music that had been spinning around my head. She cried.” Laura 

“The Erik Kessels workshop in Fez has been a fantastic and motivational experience that I will carry with me my whole life.” Andy

“The choice of city (Fez) to develop such an educational and inspirational workshop is amazing, since the immersion begins as soon as you arrive. You are induced to leave your comfort zone and search for new references and perspectives, and given that the culture and language are so unique they also become great ingredients in this creative quest. The whole infrastructure offered during the workshop and also the specific venue where the meetings and tutorial activities took place were all part of the environment, serving to create a peaceful and harmonic atmosphere that continuously inspired us all during the workshop.” Alan

Antoine DAgata workshop in Fez was a mind shaking experience, and for me that was just what I needed! Antoines repeated question to me was, “but what do you want?” What a simple question it may seem but to truly honestly answer this was one of the hardest things. Antoine struggled with me daily to be truthful to the process of shooting and to my work. Trying to do this as a white woman in a muslim foreign country seemed scary at first. But soon enough this fear pushed me to go farther than I had before. To take more risks and be more bold. In the end, I had allowed myself to befriend men and women who were at first just strangers on the street. My once beautiful but safely intimate portraiture became more real for me, evoking not only the fear of letting myself leap in a strange place but in the process of doing so, being able to see so much more in others.

The workshop venue was such a treat and incredible place to be able to go to every day. A sanctuary to rest and to edit and collect your thoughts. A place to run into your fellow work shoppers and bounce around ideas. The food was more than I had expected and in fact pretty much the best food I ate in Morocco in my three weeks travel. Tim and Michael were so on top of the workshop; they were there managing every detail from accommodations, food, coordinating the class meetings, running film to labs, scanning, and even just being sweet and kind pals to talk with about your day or have a beer with and brainstorm about your project.

All in all, this workshop could not have been better and I feel so lucky to have had such an opportunity. Antoines phenomenal out of the box thinking and honesty is one of a kind. 1000 Words workshops fall into the ‘do not miss this’ category!” Katie


HOW TO SUBMIT:
We require that you send 10 images as low res jpegs and/or a link to your website, as well as a short biography and statement about why you think it will be relevant for you to work with Boris (approx. 200 words total). Submissions are to be sent to [email protected] with the following subject header: SUBMISSION FOR 1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV.

01 October 2012: Deadline for applications
03 October 2012: Successful candidates contacted
12 October 2012: Deposit due (£500)
31 October 2012: Second installment due (£750)
04 November 2012: Arrive in Morocco for welcoming dinner
05 November 2012: Workshop begins
09 November 2012: Workshop ends

Удачи!