Category Archives: Women Photographers

Photo Show – City of Home by Alina Kisina on show at Light House Media Centre in Wolverhampton

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City of Home, © Alina Kisina

Last year I posted on Ukrainian photographer Alina Kisina‘s show City of Home and am delighted to report that her latest work from the series is on show at the Light House Media Centre, Wolverhampton until 25 January 2013.  The exhibition includes new work specially commissioned by Light House.

And if you’re still thinking about Christmas presents, there is a special edition of three of her latest works available, including the two images posted here, for sale during the holiday season. Only 50 of each print will be produced and each will be numbered, signed by the photographer, and have a certificate of authenticity. Each unframed A4 print costs £75 + £7.50 p&p. A set of all three images can be bought for £200 + £12.50 p&p and includes an archival box and a set of gloves.

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City of Home, © Alina Kisina

Professor Raoul Eschelman, author of Performatism, or the End of Postmodernism, writes about the work:
“Alina Kisina’s photographs of urban spaces in her native Kiev are not documentary pictures in the usual sense of the word. Rather, Kisina’s work mixes abstraction and representation to create evocative images that elude easy description or categorization. The most striking aspect of her art is its bold use of reflections. These juxtapose different levels of reality in a way that confounds our notions of up and down, in and out, fore and back. But her aim is not simply to confuse us. Rather, the overlapping planes of reality draw us dynamically into her photos to produce a sensation of depth suggesting another, more profound dimension beyond the mere givens of the picture.
“In many of the photographs in the Light House exhibit, this is done in a way that is best described as dramatic. Powerfully etched lines, curves, and forms draw us into a receding space marked by extreme glare or by patches of bright light that seem to dissolve material reality within them. The photos of this kind take the form of dramatic epiphanies—intuitive, overpowering insights into the nature of reality experienced through commonplace forms and scenes.”

There is also a great interview with Light House about her work. Finally, Coventry-born photographer, teacher and supporter of Kisina’s work, John Blakemore, spoke to her in a filmed interview that will be available shortly.

Filed under: Photo Talks, Podcasts, Women Photographers Tagged: Alina Kisina, City of Home, John Blakemore, Light House Media Centre, photo show, Professor Raoul Eschelman, Wolverhampton

Guest Blogger 3 – Join Hotshoe Blog’s conversation On the Move: Mobile Photography at World Photo Organisation

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The Great Escape © Janine Graf

Ansel Adams said it best: “There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept”. Janine Graf from interview

EXCERPT FROM WPO BLOG:

Welcome back to my fourth post leading up until Christmas. Today I turn to the world of mobile photography with the help of Joanne Carter from The App Whisperer to find out more. What’s clear is that mobile photography is here to stay; it’s fun, there’s a growing community of like-minded people getting involved and it allows people to shoot and edit on the go, giving them greater freedom than using a DSLR.

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(L-R) Joanne Carter and Miranda Gavin Hotshoe Blog at the mObilepixatiOn show. Image by Dilshad Corleone (Columnist for theappwhisperer.com)

Before this, there are two things to mention. The Sony World Photography Awards, which is judged in late January, is viewed on screen and it makes no difference what type of equipment is used to produce submitted photographs. However, the competition asks photographers to note the cameras used in their submissions. One of 2011’s finalists, Balazs Gardi followed Afghani troops and edited his work with hipstamatic. I’m trying to get stats as to how many submissions are produced on mobile devices as I would like to monitor this in relation to international photo competitions. Also, I have a suggestion for the Sony World Photography Awards. What about adding a Mobile Photography category to next year’s awards?

Secondly, as it’s the lead up to Christmas, here at Hotshoe magazine we’re offering one person a year’s subscription to the magazine, plus a free copy of the Oct/Nov 2012 edition of the magazine sent to your home. All you have to do is go to the Hotshoe International Facebook page and LIKE the magazine by the end of the week. That’s it. The team at Hotshoe will select a winner at random from those ‘liking’ the page this week and I will announce the lucky winner next week on this blog. Happy Christmas.

To read interviews with some of the key players in the world pof mobile photography and photo art click on this link On the Move – Mobile Photography, to the rest of the post. You won’t be disappointed, there are some very interesting points made by the interviewees.

Filed under: Mobile Photo Art, Mobile Photography, Photographers, Portraiture, street photography, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Janine Graf, Joanne Carter, Miranda Gavin, Mobile photo art, Mobile Photography, mobilepixation, The App Whisperer

Photo Show – Helen Sears Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments on show at Klompching Gallery New York

© Helen Sear, Sightlines, Untitled 4, 2011. Archival Pigment Print with Acrylic Gesso 7.25” x 7.25”, Edition of 3. From $2,000

© Helen Sear, Pastoral Monument 11, Fumaria Bastardi, 2012, Archival Pigment Print, 27.5” x 27.5”, Edition of 3 + 2 AP’s (AP1 nfs). From $3,000.

 SIGHTLINES AND PASTORAL MOMENTS
The third solo exhibition of new artworks by the British photographer Helen Sear is on until 26 October at the Klompching Gallery in New York. Two new series will be presented as the gallery’s opening exhibition for the 2012–2013 season, accompanied by the US launch of the monograph charting a more than 25-year practice.

“Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments continue Sear’s commitment to conceptual applications, integration of photographic process, historical reference and visual allure. Sightlines is an exquisite set of 21 photographs, partially concerned with ideas about the unique object and the copy. The images themselves depict a portrait of a woman whose face is obscured by a mass-produced, but hand-painted figurine of a bird. Sear alters the final photograph through the application of several layers of white primer—gesso.

“The images, then, are also about photographing paint and painting photographs. This convergence of the unique and/or the copy is further implicated by notions of her concern with identity.obscuring the face of the woman, Sear interrupts the gaze of both sitter and observer. The spectator of the photograph is unable to know the sitter’s identity, in a similar way that she/he can’t know the identity of the person(s) who hand-painted the bird. These small-scale photographs confound our expectations in the most delightful way, and are a testimony to the conceptual and visual strength of Sear’s practice.

“Showing alongside Sightlines, is Pastoral Monuments, which expands an underlying theme of the real and the re-presentation of it. In this case, Sear references the historical photographs of the botanist and photographer, Mary Dillwyn, whose photographs from the early 1850’s depicted wild flowers arranged in domestic crockery. Sear has sourced more than 80 wild flowers from the same Welsh field and photographed them in jugs and vases from around the world.

“Through handling the resulting prints and rephotographing them—evidencing this handling—Sear believes that “the flowers and their containers become connected in a material sense, across the surface of the image.” Further, we see in the photographs familiar ideas associated with flowers—youth, beauty and mortality. In some ways, these photographs become monuments to flowers.” Press release.

Filed under: Art shows, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Helen Sears, New York, Pastoral Monuments, Sightlines

Photo Stroll – The V&A’s permanent Photographs Gallery collection 2011-12

Click to view slideshow.

When I went to the press call at the V&A for the announcement of the up-and-coming show of work from the Middle East, I got shown the exhibition of photographs taken from the V&A’s permanent collection. The collection is of photos from 1839 to the 1960s and changes on a yearly basis. It includes some gems from the photographic archives, one of which, Parliament Street from Trafalgar Square, Attributed to M. de Ste Croix, 1839, can be seen in the slideshow below, is on a 1:10 cycle. That is, it can only be exhibited one in ten years for preservation reasons.

I highly recommend a visit before the autumn when a new set of photographs will be on display. And if that’s not possible, then read more to enjoy a virtual photo stroll and a gallery of thumbnails of all the images.

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Filed under: Documentary photography, Fashion Photography, Photographers, Photography Shows, Portraiture, Women Photographers Tagged: archives, daguerrotype, history of photography, london, M. de Ste Croix, Parliament Street from Trafalgar Square, photo exhibition, V&A Photographs Gallery 2011-12

Photo Shows – Debby Besford’s series The Boudoir of the Burlesque Performer on show at The Queen of Hungary Norwich

There is no particular order to the photographs. It is intended that the viewer spend time looking at the details of each interior, finding clues that only scratch the surface of the performer’s true identity. Debby Besford, The Boudoir of the Burlesque Performer

All photos © Debby Besford

Before I get accused of being London-centric, I’m delighted to let you know that photographer Debby Besford, who I met three years ago in Arles where I first saw this project, is exhibiting work from her series The Boudoir of the Burlesque Performer at theThe Queen of Hungary (what a fitting name) in Norwich. The show is open from 12-5pm and runs until 8 July. The work is also available as a book on Blurb.

In Besford’s artist’s statement she notes that: “These documentary photographs show the private interiors of the performers’ bedrooms. They play on the idea of what is real and what is fictional. The home-based domestic interiors are in themselves a theatre where the lives of the performers take on a different persona.

“Collaboration with these women has been a journey of immense trust and respect. I did not seek to deconstruct the female performer stereotype or their bedrooms but to explore how these women have taken on total responsibility for the acceptance of their image as well as the fantasies linked to public representation of their ‘acted bodies’.

“My work investigates a complexity of issues about the representation of the contemporary female, with emphasis on the Burlesque Stage Performer. This naturally led onto questioning both the idea of play between photographer, private space, intimacy, fantasy and the real, as well as the mystique of the performer.” From Besford’s artist statement

To see and read more…


“This body of work has evolved from a deep-rooted curiosity about female sexuality and how this can be expressed in a positive way. The New Burlesque Revival in the 21st Century could be seen as a reaction to women wanting to have fun with their sexuality and celebrate their femininity through a staged persona.

“The attraction for many of these women is that there is no dominant male structure behind these shows and full social and economic autonomy for these women is completely unlike a striptease artist. Both physical and moral integrity are preserved. Burlesque does not involve total nudity.”


All photos © Debby Besford

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Shows, Women Photographers Tagged: burlesque, Debby Besford, documentary, Norwich, photo show, portraits, The Boudoir of the Burlesque Performer, The Queen of Hungary

Photo News – Art Fund supports a major collection of Middle Eastern photography and show for V&A and British Museum

“In the past few years contemporary photographic practice from and about the Middle East has been some of the most exciting, innovative and varied art anywhere in the world…” Marta Weiss, curator

From the series Upekkha, 2011, Nermine Hammam, 2011. Archival inkjet print, 60 x 90 cm, Copyright V&A. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum, Light from the Middle East: New Photograph

A major collection of contemporary photography, focusing on the Middle East, has been set up for the public by the British Museum and the V&A with funds from the Art Fund. The collection has been in development since 2009 and is funded by over £150,000 of support from the Art Fund.

Most of the collection will be showcased at the V&A (Porter Gallery) in an exhibition Light from the Middle East: New Photography opening on 13 November 2012 and running until 7 April 2013. The show will be the first major museum exhibition of contemporary photography from and about the Middle East and will tour nationally in 2013.

The show is divided into three sections around key themes: Recording, Reframing and Resisting. Expect works that “respond to the social challenges and political upheavals of the Middle East over the last 30 years” or “the last 20 years”, depending on which of the two press releases one reads.

Included are internationally established practitioners such as Abbas (Iran), Youssef Nabil (Egypt) and Walid Raad (Lebanon) as well as emerging photographers including Taysir Batniji (Palestine), Atiq Rahimi (Afghanistan), Shadi Ghadirian (Iran), Mehraneh Atashi (Iran), Nermine Hammam (Egypt), Manal al-Dowayan (Saudi Arabia) and Abdulnasser Gharem (Saudi Arabia), who also happens to be a lieutenant colonel in the Saudi army.

‘Bodiless I’ from the series ‘Zourkhaneh Project (House of Strength)’, Mehraneh Atashi, 2004. Digital c-print, 76.5 x 112.5 cm. Copyright British Museum. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum. Light from the Middle East: New Photography

There are over 80 works (90 in one press release) in the collection produced by 22 (28 in one press release) emerging and established artists “living in the region or in diaspora”. The works are diverse in terms of technique and subject matter and straddle genres including photojournalism, staged and manipulated imagery.

The collection of Middle Eastern photography has been “built in response to a surge of interest in the visual arts in the region, beginning to remedy the under-representation of Middle Eastern photography in the UK”.

From the series ‘Mothers of Martyrs’, Newsha Tavakolian, 2006. Digital c-print, 50 x 76 cm, Copyright V&A. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum

To see the collection go to Art Fund Middle Eastern.

From the series ‘Qajar’, Shadi Ghadirian, 1998. Gelatin silver bromide print, 30 x 24 cm. Copyright V&A. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum. Special terms: Light from the Middle East: New Photography

Filed under: Photographers, Photography News, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Art Fund, Atiq Rahimi, British Museum, contemporary photography, Light from the Middle East: New Photography, Marta Weiss, Mehraneh Atashi, Shadi Ghadirian, V&A

Photo News – Foam for You launches short film featuring Jessica Backhaus and invites amateur photographers to contribute to Wonder Flickr group

Foam For You has launched the second in its series of short films with Jessica Backhaus giving an insight into her working practice as she explores the theme Wonder for Foam magazine. Backhaus featured in Hotshoe magazine way back in April/may 2006 with her series Jesus and the Cherries.

Jesus and the Cherries, © Jessica Backhaus

“Foam For You is an online resource which features professional photographers providing inspiration and advice for amateurs looking to improve their own work. At the core of Foam For You’s content is a series of extended films about the work of three internationally renowned artists: Michael Wolf (USA), Jessica Backhaus (GER) and Melanie Bonajo (NL).

“They have given Foam exclusive access to their working practice in three fifteen minute documentaries. They explain the thinking behind their work and, in particular, how it relates to themes taken from different issues of Foam Magazine, in which their work appeared.”

What’s more, the best ones will appear in a gallery on the Foam website and you could win a year’s subscription to Foam Magazine.

Filed under: short films, Women Photographers Tagged: audience participation, Flickr, Foam for You, Foam magazine, Jessica Backhaus, photography inspiration, short film, Wonder

Photo Shows – Group show I LOVE YOU opens at Tenderpixel London and Mahtab Hussain’s Building Desires on show at mac Birmingham

©EJ Major, Marie Claire RIP (2004-2007). photograph courtesy of the artist.

Today two shows, one opening this week in London and another that has already opened in Birmingham. I LOVE YOU is a group show curated by Richard Ansett at Tenderpixel in London. The show runs from Friday this week until 16 June. One of the series on show is EJ Major‘s Marie Claire RIP (2004-2007), see photo above.

©Mahtab Hussain from Building Desires show. Photo courtesy of the photographer

Already on show and running until 10 June in Birmingham, Mahtab Hussain shows his series of portraits Building Desires at mac Birmingham. Go see, go look, go ponder identity in contemporary British society as explored through the lens of Hussain, who describes himself as a British Pakistani Kashmiri, and asks the question: What does it mean to be a British Pakistani male today?

I LOVE YOU
A photograph is a secret about a secret…the more it tells you the less you know. Diane Arbus
Major says of the series: ”Marie Claire RIP is based on an article published in Marie Claire magazine in 2002 featuring police mug-shots of the same woman taken over a fourteen year period. The article revealed that not long after the last picture was taken the woman was found dead. Marie Claire RIP is a re-staging of these images using the artist as subject.

“This piece was motivated by a desire to memorialise an unnamed person, a woman who had already died and had no control over the use of her image. At the same time the piece is intended to be non-specific in terms of the nature of the character’s demise.. While the piece challenges the veracity of the photographic portrait it also finds an authenticity in a notion of self-portraiture that involves acting. It is me and it isn’t her and yet it is her and it isn’t me at the same time.”

I LOVE YOU also includes work by Grace Brown, Natasha Caruana, Pete McGovern and Andre Penteado. I have to admit though that I am a bit stumped by the accompanying text to the show and how exactly it relates to the title and theme of the show. I leave it with you, dear readers, to follow the link and enlighten me as to how it applies. I get the gist and I can understand some of the references but am not sure how it relates. That said, I will pop along to the opening on Friday briefly as I am back on UK terra firma.

And on the topic of I Love You, here’s a link to the short video mash-up to Lionel Richie’s Hello that I posted in February but feel like linking to again.

BUILDING DESIRES
Hussain’s project – created over the last four years since he was at Goldsmiths studying for a BA in Art History – introduces three key elements of masculinity; the young boy bound by cultural and religious constraints, the teenager who begins to form a new identity on the streets away from the security of family, and the contemporary Pakistani male who has adopted desirable mainstream ideals of what it mean to be man living in the UK.

For Building Desires, Hussain is also engaging with the local community in Birmingham and has created a live working wall where the audience can answer his key question about identity. “I also add an interview (text format) that I have conducted with an individual each week, talking about masculinity and identity and also an image of the week.” I saw some of Hussain’s portraits from the ongoing series quite a while back and was impressed by his gentle approach to both the individual photographic subjects as well as the topic of identity, as a whole. However, I’ve yet to see the recent portraits.

See more from the project…

©Mahtab Hussain from Building Desires show. Photo courtesy of the photographer

©Mahtab Hussain from Building Desires show. Photo courtesy of the photographer

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Building Desires, EJ Major, I LOVE YOU, london, mac Birmigham, Mahtab Hussain, Marie Claire RIP, portraiture, Tenderpixel Gallery